Lord Tim Hudson

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Tim Hudson
Born (1940-02-11) 11 February 1940 (age 77)
Prestbury, Cheshire
Occupation DJ

'Lord' Tim Hudson (born February 11, 1940, Prestbury, Cheshire), was an English DJ in Los Angeles for KFWB during the 1960s, and was the manager of The Seeds and The Lollipop Shoppe.[1] He has also been a voice actor, an artist and a sports manager.[2]

When The Beatles embarked on their 1965 North American concert tour, radio station KCBQ employed Hudson, who described himself as a record producer from Liverpool, England, and who claimed to know The Beatles personally, and to have helped discover the Moody Blues, to make broadcasts publicising the 'Fab Four's appearances in the San Diego area.[3] Using his contacts with The Beatles' managers in England, Hudson managed to get permission to travel with the group prior to their concert in San Diego, and to file reports to be aired exclusively on KCBQ.[3]

In March 1966, Hudson presented Nancy Sinatra in Hollywood, California, with a gold disc to mark her million seller, "These Boots Are Made for Walkin'". However, as the actual gold record had failed to arrive in time from New York, Hudson had to present Sinatra with the similarly earned disc of Dean Martin's "Everybody Loves Somebody".[4]

A cricket fan, for a period he managed the professional cricketer, and one-time England captain, Ian Botham.[5][6]

Hudson was also a voice actor during the 1960s and 1970s, and appeared in Disney's The Aristocats (1970) as 'Hip Cat' the English cat, and The Jungle Book (1967) as Dizzy the Vulture.[2]

The latest edition of Hudson's autobiography From the Beatles to Botham was published in 2014.[7]

Partial filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Thomas S. Hischak (2011). Disney Voice Actors: A Biographical Dictionary. McFarland. p. 103. ISBN 0786486945. Retrieved 24 January 2015. 
  2. ^ a b "'Hippie' cricket pitch for sale". BBC. 6 January 2005. Retrieved 24 January 2015. 
  3. ^ a b "The Beatles Live! At Balboa Stadium 1965" (PDF). The Journal of San Diego History. 2008. pp. 21–36. Retrieved 24 January 2015. 
  4. ^ Tobler, John (1992). NME Rock 'N' Roll Years (1st ed.). London: Reed International Books Ltd. p. 156. ISBN 0600576027. 
  5. ^ "Bang goes Beefy". The Guardian. 30 September 2007. Retrieved 24 January 2015. 
  6. ^ "Beefy bites back". The Guardian. 28 October 2007. Retrieved 24 January 2015. 
  7. ^ "Nibbles and Bits". The Los Angeles Times. 4 December 1991. Retrieved 24 January 2015. 

External links[edit]