Lordstown, Ohio

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Lordstown, Ohio
Village of Lordstown
The Almon G. McCorkle House, a historic site in the village
The Almon G. McCorkle House, a historic site in the village
Location of Lordstown, Ohio
Location of Lordstown, Ohio
Location of Lordstown in Trumbull County
Location of Lordstown in Trumbull County
Coordinates: 41°10′18″N 80°52′0″W / 41.17167°N 80.86667°W / 41.17167; -80.86667
CountryUnited States
StateOhio
CountyTrumbull
Government
 • MayorArno Hill
Area
 • Total23.14 sq mi (59.93 km2)
 • Land23.14 sq mi (59.93 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation951 ft (290 m)
Population
 • Total3,417
 • Estimate 
(2018[4])
3,266
 • Density147.7/sq mi (57.0/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
44481
Area code(s)234/330
FIPS code39-44912[5]
GNIS feature ID1061443[2]
Websiteweb.archive.org/web/20090204055519/http://www.lordstown.com/home.asp

Lordstown is a village in Trumbull County, Ohio, United States. It is part of the Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, OH-PA Metropolitan Statistical Area. Lordstown Township, which nearly completely incorporated as the village of Lordstown in 1975 (except for a small section which was then annexed to Warren Township), was one of the original survey townships of the Connecticut Western Reserve as Town 3, Range 4. The township, and subsequently the village, was named for Samuel P. Lord, who laid out the township.[6] The population was 3,417 at the 2010 census.

Lordstown is best known as the home of the Lordstown Assembly, a General Motors automotive plant that produced compact cars from 1966 until 2019.[7] After the closure of Youngstown's steel factories, the Lordstown Assembly became the largest industrial employer of the Youngstown-Warren area.

Geography[edit]

Lordstown is located at 41°10′18″N 80°52′00″W / 41.17167°N 80.86667°W / 41.17167; -80.86667Coordinates: 41°10′18″N 80°52′00″W / 41.17167°N 80.86667°W / 41.17167; -80.86667 (41.171785, -80.866655).[8] It borders or touches the following other townships and municipalities:

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 23.14 square miles (59.93 km2), all land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
19803,280
19903,4043.8%
20003,6336.7%
20103,417−5.9%
Est. 20183,266[4]−4.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 3,417 people, 1,391 households, and 1,025 families living in the village. The population density was 147.7 inhabitants per square mile (57.0/km2). There were 1,496 housing units at an average density of 64.6 per square mile (24.9/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 95.1% White, 3.2% African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 0.1% from other races, and 1.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.9% of the population.

There were 1,391 households of which 29.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.0% were married couples living together, 10.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 26.3% were non-families. 22.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 2.86.

The median age in the village was 45 years. 21.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.3% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.7% were from 25 to 44; 32.7% were from 45 to 64; and 17.2% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 48.6% male and 51.4% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 3,633 people, 1,412 households, and 1,077 families living in the village. The population density was 157.0 people per square mile (60.6/km²). There were 1,483 housing units at an average density of 64.1 per square mile (24.8/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 95.84% White, 2.89% African American, 0.08% Native American, 0.36% Asian, 0.11% from other races, and 0.72% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.44% of the population.

There were 1,412 households out of which 32.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.7% were married couples living together, 9.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.7% were non-families. 21.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 2.97.

In the village, the population was spread out with 24.0% under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 27.9% from 25 to 44, 30.0% from 45 to 64, and 11.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 97.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.8 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $51,144, and the median income for a family was $55,305. Males had a median income of $45,082 versus $28,063 for females. The per capita income for the village was $22,683. About 5.6% of families and 4.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.7% of those under age 18 and 6.4% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Lordstown Local School District operates one elementary school and Lordstown High School.[10]

Lordstown has a public library, a branch of the Warren-Trumbull County Public Library.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-25. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  4. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 30, 2019.
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ Overman, William Daniel (1958). Ohio Town Names. Akron, OH: Atlantic Press. p. 78.
  7. ^ Sess, Dave (2018-11-26). "General Motors Lordstown will stop production in March". WKBN. Retrieved 2018-11-27.
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  9. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  10. ^ "Lordstown Local School District". GreatSchools. Retrieved 3 March 2018.
  11. ^ "Locations". Warren-Trumbull County Public Library. Retrieved 3 March 2018.

External links[edit]