Lori Gottlieb

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Lori Gottlieb is an American writer[1] and psychotherapist.[2] She is the author of the New York Times bestseller, Maybe You Should Talk to Someone,[3] which is being adapted as a TV series.[4] She also writes the weekly “Dear Therapist” advice column[5] for The Atlantic and is the co-host of the iHeart Radio podcast "Dear Therapists."[6] Her TED Talk was one of the top most-watched talks of 2019.[7]

Life and career[edit]

Gottlieb was born in Los Angeles in 1966. She obtained her undergraduate degree from Stanford University in 1989, where she was a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma.[8] She obtained a Masters of Clinical Psychology at Pepperdine University in 2010.[9] She is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist.[10] Gottlieb went on to become a commentator for National Public Radio[11] and a contributing editor for The Atlantic.[12] She has written for many publications, including The New York Times, Time, Slate, People, Elle, Glamour, Cosmopolitan, and O, The Oprah Magazine.[13] She frequently appears as an expert on mental health topics on television and radio such as The Today Show, Good Morning America, The CBS Early Show, CNN, the BBC, and NPR.[14]

She told the story of how she had her son at The Moth mainstage show in Aspen.[15]

Her bestselling memoir/self-help book Maybe You Should Talk to Someone is being developed and adapted for television by Eva Longoria for ABC Network. [16]

Works[edit]

  • Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, Her Therapist, and Our Lives Revealed, Houghton Mifflin, 2019 ISBN 9781328662057
  • Marry Him: The Case for Settling for Mr Good Enough[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The New York Times - Search". www.nytimes.com. Archived from the original on December 24, 2019. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  2. ^ "Lori Gottieb - Therapy, Reproductive Counseling and Coaching Services". Lori Gottlieb. Archived from the original on March 27, 2019. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  3. ^ "Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, HER Therapist, and Our Lives Revealed". www.amazon.com. April 2, 2019. Retrieved November 26, 2020.
  4. ^ VanDenburgh, Barbara. "Even therapists need therapists: Lori Gottlieb on being 'less afraid to go and talk to somebody'". USA TODAY. Archived from the original on August 12, 2020. Retrieved November 26, 2020.
  5. ^ "Dear Therapist". The Atlantic. Archived from the original on March 30, 2019. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  6. ^ "Dear Therapists on Apple Podcasts". Apple Podcasts. Archived from the original on November 25, 2020. Retrieved November 26, 2020.
  7. ^ TED, The most popular talks of 2019 | TED Talks, archived from the original on October 25, 2020, retrieved November 26, 2020
  8. ^ magazine, STANFORD. "A Blonde's Bombshell". stanfordmag.org. Retrieved September 30, 2021.
  9. ^ "Triple Booked | Pepperdine University". www.pepperdine.edu. Retrieved September 30, 2021.
  10. ^ "CALIFORNIA BOARD OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES".{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  11. ^ "NPR Search : NPR". www.npr.org. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  12. ^ "Masthead - The Atlantic". www.theatlantic.com. Archived from the original on December 13, 2020. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  13. ^ "Articles". Lori Gottlieb. Archived from the original on December 10, 2019. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  14. ^ "Press". Lori Gottlieb. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  15. ^ "The Moth | Podcast | Diavian Walters and Lori Gottlieb". The Moth. Archived from the original on October 8, 2018. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  16. ^ VanDenburgh, Barbara. "Even therapists need therapists: Lori Gottlieb on being 'less afraid to go and talk to somebody'". USA Today. Archived from the original on August 12, 2020. Retrieved March 29, 2021.
  17. ^ "Marry Him". www.goodreads.com. Archived from the original on March 29, 2021. Retrieved August 29, 2019.