Los Pasteles Verdes

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Los Pasteles Verdes
Origin Chimbote, Peru
Genres Bolero, psychedelic pop
Years active 1973–present
Members
  • Hugo Acuña
  • Dubbie Acuña
  • Richie Acuña
  • Kike Gamez
  • Victor Hugo Acuña Jr.
Past members
  • German Laos
  • César Acuña
  • Tommy Lamas
  • Tito Cerna
  • Jorge Luis Príncipe
  • Miguel Moreno
  • Juan Vasquez
  • Adan Zavaleta
  • Guillermo Araujo
  • Raul Padilla
  • Aldo Guibovich
  • Fernando Arias

Los Pasteles Verdes was a Latin pop group most popular in the 1970s. They originated in Chimbote, Peru, but performed for many years in Mexico.[1]

History[edit]

Los Pasteles Verdes was founded by guitarist Víctor Hugo Acuña and keyboardist Cesar Acuña, who are brothers; they had previously played together in The Jeekstones and Los Benkers.[1] In 1973 they formed Los Pasteles Verdes with Singers: Aldo Guibovich, German Laos, drummer Jorge Luis Principe, bassist Miguel Moreno, and percussionist Juan Vásquez. Their first hit, a success across Latin America, was "Angelitos Negros", which preceded the release of their debut Recuerdos de Una Noche.[1] Among their later hits were "Hipocresia" and "Esclavo y Amo".[citation needed]

The group made a significant impact on the Mexican and Mexican-American musical markets in the late 1970s.[2] For part of the 1970s and 1980s they were based out of Mexico. They toured Japan in 2007.[3]

Members[edit]

Current
  • Hugo Acuña
  • Dubbie Acuña
  • Richie Acuña
  • Kike Gamez
  • Victor Hugo Acuña Jr.
Former
  • German Laos
  • César Acuña
  • Tommy Lamas
  • Tito Cerna
  • Jorge Luis Príncipe
  • Miguel Moreno
  • Juan Vasquez
  • Adan Zavaleta
  • Guillermo Araujo
  • Raul Padilla
  • Aldo Guibovich
  • Fernando Arias

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Drago Bonacich, Los Pasteles Verdes at Allmusic
  2. ^ p. 60. Alejandro Luis Madrid-González, Nor-Tec-Rifa: Electronic Dance Music from Tijuana to the World. Oxford University Press, 2008.
  3. ^ Los Pasteles Verdes visitaron Japón. IPC Digital, February 8, 2007.

External links[edit]