Lost Girls (film)

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Lost Girls
Lost Girls poster.jpeg
Official poster
Directed byLiz Garbus
Produced by
Written byMichael Werwie
Based onLost Girls: An Unsolved American Mystery
by Robert Kolker
Starring
CinematographyIgor Martinovic
Edited byCamilla Toniolo
Production
companies
  • Archer Gray
  • Langley Park Productions
Distributed byNetflix
Release date
  • January 28, 2020 (2020-01-28) (Sundance)
  • March 13, 2020 (2020-03-13) (United States)
Running time
95 minutes[1]
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Lost Girls is a 2020 American mystery drama film, directed by Liz Garbus, from a screenplay by Michael Werwie, and based on the book Lost Girls: An Unsolved American Mystery by Robert Kolker. The film revolves around the murders of young female sex workers on the South Shore barrier islands of Long Island, committed by the Long Island serial killer, who remains unidentified.

Lost Girls stars Amy Ryan as real life activist Mari Gilbert, along with Thomasin McKenzie, Lola Kirke, Oona Laurence, Dean Winters, Miriam Shor, Reed Birney, Kevin Corrigan and Gabriel Byrne. It had its world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival on January 28, 2020, and was released on March 13, 2020, by Netflix.

Premise[edit]

Mari Gilbert relentlessly drives law enforcement agents to search for her missing daughter and, in the process, sheds light on a wave of unsolved murders of young female sex workers on the South Shore barrier islands of Long Island, committed by the Long Island serial killer.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

In March 2016, it was announced Liz Garbus would direct the film, from a screenplay by Michael Werwie, based on the novel of the same name by Robert Kolker. Kevin McCormack, David Kennedy, Rory Koslow, Amy Nauiokas, and Anne Carey served as producers on the film, while Pamela Hirsch executive produced. Amazon Studios was initially set to distribute.[3] In February 2017, Sarah Paulson was set to star in the film as real life activist Mari Gilbert.[4] In May 2018, Amy Ryan replaced Paulson, and Netflix was set as distributor.[5] In October 2018, Thomasin McKenzie (who dropped out of Top Gun: Maverick to work on the film), Gabriel Byrne, Oona Laurence, Lola Kirke, Miriam Shor, Reed Birney, Kevin Corrigan and Rosal Colon joined the cast.[6][7]

Filming[edit]

Principal photography began on October 15, 2018, in New York City.[8]

Release[edit]

The film had its world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival on January 28, 2020,[9] and was released on March 13, 2020, by Netflix.[10]

Critical reception[edit]

Lost Girls holds a 73% approval rating on review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes, based on 48 reviews, with a weighted average of 6.19/10. The website's critical consensus reads, "Raw yet rewarding, Lost Girls overcomes uneven storytelling with powerful performances and a willingness to resist easy catharsis."[11] On Metacritic, the film holds a rating of 69 out of 100, based on 13 critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews."[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Lost Girls". Sundance Film Festival. Retrieved December 14, 2019.
  2. ^ https://www.imdb.com/title/tt3111426/
  3. ^ Siegel, Tatiana (March 9, 2016). "Liz Garbus in Talks to Direct Serial Killer Film 'Lost Girls' for Amazon (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved October 16, 2018.
  4. ^ Ford, Rebecca; Kit, Borys (February 3, 2017). "Sarah Paulson to Star in Serial-Killer Film 'Lost Girls' (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved October 16, 2018.
  5. ^ Kit, Borys (May 16, 2018). "Amy Ryan Replaces Sarah Paulson as 'Lost Girls' Moves From Amazon to Netflix (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved October 16, 2018.
  6. ^ N’Duka, Amanda (October 26, 2018). "Lost Girls': Gabriel Byrne, Lola Kirke, Miriam Shor & More Round Out Cast Of Netflix Crime Feature". Deadline Hollywood.
  7. ^ Netflix's 'Lost Girls' Adds Thomasin McKenzie, Lola Kirke and Dean Winters
  8. ^ "Lost Girls". Production List. Retrieved October 16, 2018.
  9. ^ Siegel, Tatiana (December 4, 2019). "Sundance Unveils Female-Powered Lineup Featuring Taylor Swift, Gloria Steinem, Abortion Road Trip Drama". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved December 4, 2019.
  10. ^ Russian, Ale (January 16, 2020). "Amy Ryan Plays a Mother Fighting for Answers in Gripping Trailer for Netflix's Lost Girls". People. Retrieved January 16, 2020.
  11. ^ "Lost Girls". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved March 21, 2020.
  12. ^ "Lost Girls Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved March 14, 2020.

External links[edit]