Louisiana's 1st congressional district

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Louisiana's 1st congressional district
Louisiana US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
Louisiana's 1st congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
U.S. Representative
  Steve Scalise
RJefferson
Distribution
  • 86.02[1]% urban
  • 13.98% rural
Population (2016)803,427[2]
Median income$58,199[3]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+24[4]

Louisiana's 1st congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Louisiana. The district comprises land from the northern shore of Lake Pontchartrain south to the Mississippi River delta.

The district is currently represented by Republican Steve Scalise.

History[edit]

Prior to 1974, the 1st Congressional District was entirely south of Lake Pontchartrain. As a result of population changes reflected in the 1970 U.S. Census and a concern to ensure that the 2nd Congressional District was majority African American, the district was redrawn to include the Northshore.[Source Needed] This was done to comply with the Voting Rights Act,[Source Needed] passed in 1965 to enforce constitutional rights of minorities in voting, including the opportunity to elect a representative of their choosing and to redistrict after censuses.

In 1974, the state legislature redefined the 1st Congressional District, dropping its precincts south of the lake and adding St. Tammany Parish, which borders Lake Pontchartrain on the north, from the 6th Congressional District. Subsequently, the 1st Congressional District acquired Tangipahoa and Washington parishes, both north of the lake, from the 6th Congressional District.

Correspondingly, the 1st Congressional District shed conservative St. Bernard Parish and other areas south of the lake to the 3rd Congressional District from 1984 through 2013. Overall, the 1st Congressional District has become a very safe district for the Republican Party.[5] Before the 1960s, it was controlled by Democrats, but conservative whites realigned with the Republican Party.[Source Needed]

The number of registered voters north of the lake is, as of 2008, slightly higher than south of the lake; however, the 1st Congressional District has yet to be represented by a resident from north of Lake Pontchartrain.[6] The reformulation of the 1st Congressional District so that it virtually surrounds "the nation's second-largest saltwater lake" has generated a local joke that in the 1st Congressional District of Louisiana, the voters are outnumbered by the fish.

The seat was previously held by former Governor Bobby Jindal, who was elected after David Vitter retired to successfully run for the U.S. Senate. Republicans have held the seat since 1977. That year Bob Livingston won a special election after Richard Alvin Tonry, who won the seat in 1976, was forced to resign the seat and lost the Democratic primary in the special election.

From 2003 to 2013, the district comprised mostly land on the North Shore and South Shore of Lake Pontchartrain, although it also contained areas west of Lake Pontchartrain. The district included some or all of the following parishes: Washington, St. Tammany, Tangipahoa, Jefferson, Orleans and St. Charles. It also included the cities of Hammond and Slidell and most of the western suburbs of New Orleans, including Metairie and Kenner, along with a small portion of the city itself. The district had the lowest percentage of African-American residents among the state's six-district Congressional delegation.

In 2013, St. Bernard and neighboring Plaquemines Parishes were returned to the First District after nearly 30 years in the Third. The First also picked up much of Lafourche Parish and the southernmost portion of Terrebonne Parish for the first time.

List of members representing the district[edit]

Member Party Years Electoral history Location
District created March 4, 1823
Edward Livingston of New York.jpg
Edward Livingston
Jackson Democratic-Republican March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
Elected in 1822.
[Data unknown/missing.]
Ascension, Assumption, Saint Charles, Saint John, Lafourche, Orleans, Saint Bernard, Saint James, and Terrebonne parishes
Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1829
EDWhiteSr.jpg
Edward Douglass White Sr.
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1829 –
March 3, 1833
[Data unknown/missing.]
Resigned.
March 4, 1833 –
November 15, 1834
[Data unknown/missing.]
Vacant November 15, 1834 –
December 1, 1834
H.S.Johnson.jpg
Henry Johnson
Anti-Jacksonian December 1, 1834 –
March 3, 1837
[Data unknown/missing.]
Whig March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
EDWhiteSr.jpg
Edward Douglass White Sr.
Whig March 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1843
[Data unknown/missing.]
John Slidell LA 1859.jpg
John Slidell
Democratic March 4, 1843 –
November 10, 1845
[Data unknown/missing.]
Resigned.
[Data unknown/missing.]
Emile La Sére Democratic January 29, 1846 –
March 3, 1851
[Data unknown/missing.]
Louis St. Martin Democratic March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
[Data unknown/missing.]
William Dunbar Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
[Data unknown/missing.] [Data unknown/missing.]
GeorgeEustisJr.jpg
George Eustis Jr.
Know Nothing March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1859
[Data unknown/missing.]
John Edward Bouligny - Brady-Handy.jpg
J. E. Bouligny
Know Nothing March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1861
Bouligny opposed Louisiana's secession and remained in Washington, D.C. during the Civil War. He never retook residency in Louisiana.
Vacant March 4, 1861 –
December 3, 1862
Civil War
Benjamin Franklin Flanders.jpg
Benjamin Flanders
Unionist December 3, 1862 –
March 3, 1863
Remained seated for his term during War.
Vacant March 3, 1863 –
July 18, 1868
Civil War – Louisiana under occupation [Data unknown/missing.]
Jacob Hale Sypher - Brady-Handy.jpg
Jacob Hale Sypher
Republican July 18, 1868 –
March 3, 1869
[Data unknown/missing.]
Vacant March 3, 1869 –
November 7, 1870
Contested election of Louis St. Martin and Jacob Hale Sypher, House decided neither candidate entitled to seat.
Jacob Hale Sypher - Brady-Handy.jpg
J. Hale Sypher
Republican November 7, 1870 –
March 3, 1875
Sypher's 1872 re-election was successfully contested by Effingham Lawrence. Sypher lost, but only after the original returns were certified in his favor. After protracted court intervention, Lawrence was declared elected, but just one day (March 3, 1875) remained in the term, and in the meantime Lawrence had lost the 1874 election to Democrat Randall Lee Gibson.
Effingham Lawrence Democratic March 3, 1875 –
March 3, 1875
Successfully contested Sypher's election, then retired after one day in office—the shortest service ever by a member of the House of Representatives.
Randall L. Gibson - Brady-Handy.jpg
Randall Lee Gibson
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1883
[Data unknown/missing.]
Resigned from House on election to U.S. Senate.
Carleton Hunt Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1885
[Data unknown/missing.]
Louis St. Martin Democratic March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1887
[Data unknown/missing.]
Theodore Stark Wilkinson Democratic March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1891
[Data unknown/missing.]
AdolphMeyerLA.jpg
Adolph Meyer
Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 8, 1908
[Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
Vacant March 8, 1908 –
November 3, 1908
EstopinalOfLouisiana.jpg
Albert Estopinal
Democratic November 3, 1908 –
April 28, 1919
[Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
Vacant April 28, 1919 –
June 5, 1919
James O'Connor Democratic June 5, 1919 –
March 3, 1931
Elected to finish Estopinal's term.
Lost renomination.
Joachim O Fernández .jpg
Joachim O. Fernandez
Democratic March 4, 1931 –
January 3, 1941
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost renomination.
F. Edward Hebert (D–LA).jpg
Felix Edward Hébert
Democratic January 3, 1941 –
January 3, 1977
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
Richard Alvin Tonry.jpg
Richard Alvin Tonry
Democratic January 3, 1977 –
May 4, 1977
[Data unknown/missing.]
Resigned after conviction for vote-buying.
Vacant May 4, 1977 –
August 27, 1977
BobLivingston.jpg
Bob Livingston
Republican August 27, 1977 –
March 1, 1999
Elected to finish Tonry's term.
Resigned.
Vacant March 2, 1999 –
May 29, 1999
Congressman David Vitter.png
David Vitter
Republican May 29, 1999 –
January 3, 2005
Elected to finish Livingston's term.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
January 3, 2003 –
January 3, 2005
2003 – 2013
Bobby Jindal, official 109th Congressional photo.jpg
Bobby Jindal
Republican January 3, 2005 –
January 14, 2008
Elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Resigned to become Governor of Louisiana.
Vacant January 14, 2008 –
May 3, 2008
Steve Scalise official portrait (cropped).jpg
Steve Scalise
Republican May 3, 2008 –
January 3, 2013
Elected to finish Jindal's term.
Re-elected later in 2008.
Re-elected later in 2010.
Re-elected later in 2012.
Re-elected later in 2014.
Re-elected later in 2016.
Re-elected later in 2018.
January 3, 2013 –
Present
2013 – Present

Recent Election Results[edit]

2002[edit]

Louisiana's 1st Congressional District Election (2002)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Vitter* 147,117 81.47
Republican Monica L. Monica 20,268 11.22
Republican Robert Namer 7,229 4.00
Libertarian Ian P. Hawxhurst 5,956 3.30
Total votes 180,570 100.00
Turnout  
Republican hold

2004[edit]

Louisiana's 1st Congressional District Election (2004)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bobby Jindal 225,708 78.40
Democratic Roy Armstrong 19,266 6.69
Democratic Vinny Mendoza 12,779 4.44
Democratic Daniel Zimmerman 12,135 4.22
Democratic Jerry Watts 10,034 3.49
Republican Mike Rogers 7,975 2.77
Total votes 287,897 100.00
Turnout  
Republican hold

2006[edit]

Louisiana's 1st Congressional District Election (2006)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bobby Jindal* 130,508 88.11
Democratic David Gereighty 10,919 7.37
Democratic Stacey Tallitsch 5,025 3.39
Libertarian Peter L. Beary 1,676 1.13
Total votes 148,128 100.00
Turnout  
Republican hold

2008[edit]

Louisiana's 1st Congressional District Special Election (May 3, 2008)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steve Scalise 33,867 75.14
Democratic Gilda Reed 10,142 22.50
Independent R.A. "Skip" Galan 786 1.74
Independent Anthony Gentile 280 0.62
Total votes 45,075 100.00
Turnout  
Republican hold
Louisiana's 1st Congressional District General Election (2008)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steve Scalise* 189,168 65.68
Democratic Jim Harlan 98,839 34.32
Total votes 288,007 100.00
Turnout  
Republican hold

2010[edit]

Louisiana's 1st Congressional District Election (2010)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steve Scalise* 157,182 78.52
Democratic Myron Katz 38,416 19.19
Independent Arden Wells 4,578 2.29
Total votes 200,176 100.00
Turnout  
Republican hold

2012[edit]

Louisiana's 1st Congressional District Election (2012)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steve Scalise* 193,496 66.63
Democratic Vinny Mendoza 61,703 21.25
Republican Gary King 24,844 8.55
Independent David Turknett 6,079 2.09
Independent Arden Wells 4,578 1.48
Total votes 290,410 100.00
Turnout  
Republican hold

2014[edit]

Louisiana's 1st Congressional District Election (2014)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steve Scalise* 189,250 77.56
Democratic Vinny Mendoza 24,761 10.15
Democratic Lee Dugas 21,286 8.72
Libertarian Jeff Sanford 8,707 3.57
Total votes 244,004 100.00
Turnout  
Republican hold

2016[edit]

Louisiana's 1st Congressional District Election (2016)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steve Scalise* 243,645 74.56
Democratic Lee Ann Dugas 41,840 12.80
Democratic Danil Faust 12,708 3.89
Libertarian Howard Kearney 9,405 2.88
Democratic Joe Swider 9,237 2.83
Green Eliot Barron 6,717 2.06
Independent Chuemal Yang 3,236 0.99
Total votes 326,788 100.00
Turnout  
Republican hold

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/cd_state.html
  2. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=22&cd=01
  3. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=22&cd=01
  4. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  5. ^ Cook Partisan Voting Index
  6. ^ Several residents of the northlake area (eastern Florida Parishes) served in Congress to represent the 6th Congressional District before it ceded territory to the 1st Congressional District.

Coordinates: 29°39′59″N 89°53′34″W / 29.66639°N 89.89278°W / 29.66639; -89.89278