Louisiana Highway 14

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Louisiana Highway 14 marker

Louisiana Highway 14
Route of LA 14 highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by Louisiana DOTD
Length: 100.096 mi[1] (161.089 km)
Existed: 1955 renumbering – present
Tourist
routes:
Major junctions
West end: US 90 / US 171 in Lake Charles
 

I-210 in Lake Charles
LA 27 at Holmwood
LA 26 in Lake Arthur
LA 13 west of Kaplan
LA 35 in Kaplan
US 167 in Abbeville

US 90 in New Iberia
East end: LA 182 in New Iberia
Location
Parishes: Calcasieu, Jefferson Davis, Vermilion, Cameron, Iberia
Highway system
  • Louisiana Highway System
LA 13 LA 15
SR 97 98 SR 99

Louisiana Highway 14 (LA 14) is a state highway located in southern Louisiana. It runs 100.10 miles (161.10 km) in an east–west direction from the junction of U.S. Highways 90 and 171 in Lake Charles to LA 182 in New Iberia.

The highway connects a string of small communities and cities in the Acadiana region of the state at a distance of roughly 20 to 25 miles (32 to 40 km) from the Gulf of Mexico. It connects three parish seats and traverses four parishes, briefly passing through the corner of a fifth. The majority of the route runs parallel and to the south of the busier Interstate 10 (I-10) and US 90 corridor. The biggest population centers are located on either end of the route with the intervening territory being largely rural. Apart from Lake Charles and New Iberia, LA 14 passes through the cities of Abbeville and Kaplan, as well as the towns of Lake Arthur, Gueydan, and Delcambre.

LA 14 marks the southern terminus of two U.S. Highways, US 167 in Abbeville and US 171 in Lake Charles. The highway also has interchanges with I-210 and US 90 in Lake Charles and New Iberia, respectively.

Route description[edit]

Lake Charles to Abbeville[edit]

From the west, LA 14 begins at an intersection with US 90 (Fruge Street) and US 171 (Martin Luther King Highway) in Lake Charles. This intersection, located directly east of the downtown area, also marks the southern terminus of US 171, which heads north toward DeRidder. Signs direct motorists to two nearby interchanges with I-10: north on US 171 for eastbound I-10 to Lafayette and west on US 90 for westbound I-10 to Beaumont, Texas. LA 14 travels south on Martin Luther King Highway, an undivided four-lane commercial thoroughfare with a center turning lane. After several blocks, it intersects US 90 Bus. at Broad Street, and the local name changes to Gerstner Memorial Drive. 2 miles (3.2 km) later, LA 14 passes through a diamond interchange with I-210 (Exit 8), a southern bypass of Lake Charles. South of the interstate, the surroundings begin to take on a more rural character. An intersection with LA 3186 (East McNeese Street) provides a connection to nearby McNeese State University. Shortly after crossing the city limits, LA 14 intersects LA 3092 and turns east, becoming an undivided two-lane highway. Here, the directional banners for LA 14 change from north–south to east–west for the remainder of its journey. Over the next 21 miles (34 km), LA 14 zigzags through southeastern Calcasieu Parish along rural section line roads. During this stretch, the highway intersects LA 27 at a point known as Holmwood, connecting with Cameron on the Gulf of Mexico. LA 14 also passes through the tiny unincorporated communities of Bell City and Hayes. Between them is an intersection with LA 101, which heads north toward I-10 and US 90 at Lacassine. In Hayes, the highway turns south and crosses into Jefferson Davis Parish soon afterward.[2][3][4]

Entering the southwestern corner of Jefferson Davis Parish, LA 14 turns to resume its eastward course and crosses a high-rise fixed span bridge (built in 2013 to replace an aging swing bridge)[5] over the wide and serpentine Bayou Lacassine. Over the 12 miles (19 km) between the bridge and the town of Lake Arthur, LA 14 intersects two other state highways. The first is LA 99, which heads north to junctions with I-10 and US 90 in Welsh. The second is LA 3056, leading to the nearby Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge to the south. After curving to the northeast, LA 14 reaches a T-intersection with LA 380 along the northern border of Lake Arthur, a small town located on a body of water with the same name. The route turns south onto Iowa Avenue, running concurrent with LA 380, then east onto 8th Street to Arthur Avenue. From this intersection, through traffic may bypass the center of town by continuing straight ahead on LA 380 for a short distance to LA 26. LA 14 turns south onto Arthur Avenue then east onto 3rd Street to Calcasieu Avenue. Located at this intersection is the southern terminus of LA 26, connecting with I-10 and US 90 in Jennings. LA 14 turns southeast, continuing the route of LA 26 out of Lake Arthur. It then proceeds across a continuous beam bridge over the Mermentau River and into Vermilion Parish.[2][4][6]

Just inside Vermilion Parish, LA 14 briefly passes through the northeastern corner of Cameron Parish. It then turns due east to re-enter Vermilion Parish, throughout which the route is generally designated as Veterans Memorial Drive. After 6 miles (9.7 km), LA 14 reaches the small town of Gueydan and an intersection with southbound LA 91. LA 14 turns north onto 1st Street, briefly running concurrent with LA 91 along the west end of town. After three blocks, LA 91 continues northward toward Morse while LA 14 turns east to follow Main Street, a divided four-lane thoroughfare, through Gueydan. On the east end of town, LA 14 narrows again to an undivided two-lane highway and proceeds to curve south then east along rural section line roads. Over the next 11 miles (18 km), the highway passes through points such as Wright and Mulvey, intersecting several minor state routes. Shortly after curving to the southeast, LA 14 intersects LA 13, connecting with I-10 and US 90 in Crowley, and widens to accommodate a center turning lane. The highway then immediately enters the city of Kaplan, serving as its principal east–west thoroughfare. Near the center of town is an intersection with LA 35 (Cushing Avenue), another connection to I-10 and US 90, this time in Rayne. LA 35 also heads south toward remote points along the Gulf of Mexico. Upon exiting Kaplan, LA 14 loses its center lane and proceeds due east through the tiny community of Nunez. 4 miles (6.4 km) later, the highway enters the city of Abbeville, the seat of Vermilion Parish.[2][7][8][9]

Abbeville to New Iberia[edit]

Just inside the Abbeville city limits, LA 14 Bus. branches off of highway to head through the historic downtown area. The mainline route, West Summers Drive, proceeds straight ahead and widens to a four-lane highway with a center turning lane. After a short distance, the highway intersects US 167 (Park Avenue), which heads north toward Lafayette. It then crosses a wide vertical lift bridge over Bayou Vermilion, also known as the Vermilion River. Now passing to the north of the downtown area, LA 14 intersects LA 82 (North State Street), connecting with points south of town such as Perry and Intracoastal City. Passing through a mixed residential and commercial area, the highway intersects LA 338 and curves southeast to rejoin the business route. On the east end of town, LA 14 passes the Abbeville Chris Crusta Memorial Airport and intersects LA 3267 (South Airport Road), also signed as the LA 82 truck route.[2][8][9]

As LA 14 approaches the town of Erath, the center lane gives way to a median, and the highway begins to parallel the Louisiana and Delta Railroad (LDRR) line. LA 14 proceeds to make a gentle curve around the north side of town while LA 14 Bus. branches off to follow Lastie Street through town along the rail line. Between the local roads Old Railroad Road and North Suire Street, a center turning lane briefly replaces the highway's median. Leaving Erath, an intersection with LA 339 connects the town with the Youngsville area south of Lafayette. The business route rejoins the mainline route, and LA 14 proceeds into the neighboring town of Delcambre. Here, the route intersects LA 89, another connection to Youngsville, and regains its center lane through the remainder of Delcambre. LA 14 crosses from Vermilion Parish into Iberia Parish midway through town. Leaving Delcambre, the route crosses a vertical lift bridge over the Delcambre Canal, also known as Bayou Carlin, and the surroundings become largely rural once more.[2][8][9]

In Iberia Parish, LA 14 becomes a divided four-lane highway once more and curves to the northeast away from the rail line in an area known as Bob Acres. After 7 miles (11 km), LA 14 passes through an interchange with US 90 at Exit 128A, simultaneously entering the parish seat, the city of New Iberia. US 90 connects with Lafayette to the northwest and Morgan City to the southeast. Gaining a center turning lane for a final time, LA 14 proceeds east and intersects LA 83, connecting to Weeks Island. The highway continues through town on Center Street and intersects LA 674 (East Admiral Doyle Drive). LA 14 gradually narrows to two lanes as it approaches its eastern terminus at LA 182 opposite Bayou Teche. LA 182 follows a one-way couplet along St. Peter and Main Streets, located two blocks apart.[2][9][10]

Route classification and data[edit]

LA 14 is generally classified by the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (La DOTD) as an urban principal arterial within the cities of Lake Charles, Abbeville, and New Iberia. Otherwise, the route serves as a rural major collector west of Lake Arthur and as a rural or urban minor arterial east of Lake Arthur. Daily traffic volume in 2013 peaked at 29,200 vehicles in Lake Charles and 20,800 in New Iberia. The lowest figure reported was 1,040 vehicles in rural Jefferson Davis Parish.[2][11]

The posted speed limit is 55 mph (90 km/h) in rural areas, usually reduced to between 35 mph (55 km/h) and 45 mph (70 km/h) through town.[2]

The western portion of LA 14 from Lake Charles to south of Hayes is part of the Creole Nature Trail, a National Scenic Byway All-American Road.[12] Two additional portions of LA 14 are included in the state-designated system of tourist routes known as the Louisiana Scenic Byways. The first spans from south of Hayes eastward to Lake Arthur and is part of the Flyway Byway.[13] The second portion, running from Gueydan to Delcambre, makes up the entirety of the Cajun Corridor.[14]

History[edit]

Pre-1955 route numbering[edit]

In the original Louisiana Highway system in use between 1921 and 1955, the modern LA 14 was part of three separate routes.

Western and eastern sections[edit]

The section from Lake Charles to Holmwood was a small part of State Route 42.[15] Route 42 followed the modern US 171 corridor from Lake Charles as far north as Mansfield in DeSoto Parish.[16] South of Holmwood, it followed the current LA 27 south and west to Cameron on the Gulf of Mexico.[16] The portion of Route 42 now followed by LA 14 remained the same during the pre-1955 era.[15][17]

The eastern half of LA 14 from Lake Arthur to New Iberia was also part of a much longer pre-1955 route, State Route 25.[18][19] It was the middle portion of a U-shaped route that also included the modern corridor of LA 26 to Oberlin on the west end and LA 31 to Opelousas on the east end.[16] The portion of Route 25 now followed by LA 14 had some minor differences in the pre-1955 era. Southeast of the Mermentau River bridge at Lake Arthur, the highway made a jog at LA 717 east onto Cypress Point Road then south onto Clesmae Road to rejoin the present alignment.[18] On the east side of Gueydan, the highway turned south from Main Street onto 13th Street, then east onto Maree Michel Road, and south onto Hair Road to rejoin the current alignment.[20][21] This portion of the route was re-aligned by the time of the 1955 Louisiana Highway renumbering.[18] Further east, the pre-1955 route generally followed the current business routes through Abbeville and Erath.[8][18] Sharp turns have been smoothed out over several portions of the route, most notably in Iberia Parish, where short segments of the original route bypassed during the 1920s are now local roads known as Old LA 25 Road.[2][15][22]

Middle section[edit]

State Route 98
Location: HolmwoodLake Arthur
Length: 37.7 mi[15][23] (60.7 km)
Existed: 1921–1955

The intervening section of present-day LA 14 from Holmwood to Lake Arthur made up the majority of former State Route 98.[15][23] It was created in 1921 by an act of the state legislature as one of the original 98 state highway routes.[24]

Route No. 98. Beginning at an intersection of the Grand Lake Road in Calcasieu Parish at a point immediately North of the Cameron Parish line thence East along the Cameron-Calcasieu line to the Jefferson Davis Parish line thence continuing East along the Jefferson Davis-Cameron line to a point West of Lake Arthur thence in a northeasterly direction to the town of Lake Arthur.

— 1921 legislative route description[24]

This route also extended south from Holmwood along LA 27 (former State Route 42), then west along current LA 397 and a local road to a dead end at the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway.[25] As the route description indicates, Route 98 was projected to connect with the Grand Lake Road, LA 384 (former State Route 211), but this portion of the route was apparently not improved before being bisected by the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway in the 1930s. By the time of the 1955 renumbering, the western terminus had been truncated to the point where current LA 397 turns to the north.[15]

The portion of Route 98 now followed by LA 14 remained the same during the pre-1955 era. It differed from the modern route only due to a small re-alignment between Holmwood and Bell City. The route originally turned south onto Lavoi Road through an area known as Rossignol then turned east onto Rossignol Road to rejoin the current alignment at Bell City.[15]

Post-1955 route history[edit]

LA 14 was created in 1955 as a collective renumbering of the majority of former State Route 98, as well as portions of Routes 25 and 42.[26][27]

Class "A": La 14—From a junction with La 13 at or near Kaplan through or near Abbeville to a junction with La-US 90 at or near New Iberia.
Class "B": La 14—From a junction with US 90 at or near Lake Charles through or near Holmwood, Lake Arthur and Guydan[sic] to a junction with La 13 at or near Kaplan.

— 1955 legislative route description[26]

With the 1955 renumbering, the state highway department initially categorized all routes into three classes: "A" (primary), "B" (secondary), and "C" (farm-to-market).[28] This system has since been updated and replaced by a more specific functional classification system.

Since the 1955 renumbering, the route of LA 14 has generally remained the same. Improvements to the route began with a minor re-alignment bypassing Rossignol in Calcasieu Parish around 1959.[29][30] In 1963, the western terminus in Lake Charles was moved several blocks north from Broad Street to Fruge Street when US 90 was moved onto I-10 through the downtown area.[31][32] Around 1964, the route southeast of the Mermentau River bridge at Lake Arthur was smoothed out.[31][33] In about 1966, the four-lane bypass of Abbeville was opened, allowing truck and other through traffic to avoid having to navigate around both the Magdalen and Courthouse Squares as well as a narrow lift bridge across the Vermilion River.[33][34] Around 1990, the portion of LA 14 between Delcambre and New Iberia was widened to four lanes.[35][36] The portion of the route through Lake Charles followed soon afterward.[37][38] In the late 1990s, the route between Abbeville and Delcambre was four-laned, necessitating a bypass of the main road through Erath. The original alignment has since been retained as a business route.

Future[edit]

La DOTD is currently engaged in a program that aims to transfer about 5,000 miles (8,000 km) of state-owned roadways to local governments over the next several years.[39] Under this plan of "right-sizing" the state highway system, the business routes of LA 14 through Abbeville and Erath are proposed for deletion as they do not meet a significant interurban travel function.[40]

Major intersections[edit]

Parish Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Calcasieu Lake Charles 0.000–
0.041
0.000–
0.066
US 90 (Fruge Street) to I-10 west – Beaumont
US 171 north (Martin L. King Highway) to I-10 east – DeRidder, Lafayette
Western terminus of LA 14; southern terminus of US 171
0.506 0.814
US 90 Bus. (Broad Street)
1.256 2.021 LA 1138-3 east (Legion Street) Western terminus of LA 1138-3
2.529–
2.665
4.070–
4.289
I-210 – Beaumont, Lafayette Exit 8 on I-210
4.048 6.515 LA 3186 west (East McNeese Street) Eastern terminus of LA 3186
5.298 8.526 LA 3092 south (Tom Hebert Road) Eastern terminus of LA 3092
7.314 11.771 LA 397 south West end of LA 397 concurrency
8.356 13.448 LA 397 north to I-10 East end of LA 397 concurrency
Holmwood 13.339 21.467 LA 27 south – Cameron Southern terminus of LA 27 (signed as northern terminus)
Hayes 23.371 37.612 LA 101 north – Lacassine Southern terminus of LA 101
Jefferson Davis 28.828–
28.982
46.394–
46.642
Bridge over Bayou Lacassine
32.154 51.747 LA 99 north – Welsh Southern terminus of LA 99
35.222 56.684 LA 3056 Northern terminus of LA 3056; to Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge
Lake Arthur 40.846 65.735 LA 380 west – Thornwell West end of LA 380 concurrency
41.255 66.393 LA 380 east (8th Street) – Jennings, Abbeville East end of LA 380 concurrency
42.571 68.511 LA 26 north (Calcasieu Avenue) – Jennings Southern terminus of LA 26
Jefferson DavisVermilion line 43.241–
43.929
69.590–
70.697
Bridge over Mermentau River
Vermilion 45.163 72.683 LA 717 Northern terminus of LA 717
Cameron 47.246 76.035 LA 717 Southern terminus of LA 717
Vermilion Gueydan 54.834 88.247 LA 91 south – Florence West end of LA 91 concurrency
55.137 88.734 LA 91 north (1st Street) – Morse, Midland East end of LA 91 concurrency
59.318 95.463 LA 711 Northern terminus of LA 711
Wright 61.323 98.690 LA 712 (Wright Road) Southern terminus of LA 712
Mulvey 62.327 100.306 LA 3093 (Meridian Line Road) Northern terminus of LA 3093
68.493 110.229 LA 13 north – Crowley, Eunice Southern terminus of LA 13
Kaplan 70.015 112.678 LA 35 (Cushing Avenue) – Indian Bayou, Pecan Island
Nunez 73.718 118.638 LA 695
76.260 122.729 LA 343 – Meaux, Leroy Southern terminus of LA 343
Abbeville 77.773 125.164
LA 14 Bus. east (West Port Street)
Western terminus of LA 14 Bus.
78.751 126.737 US 167 (Park Avenue) – Lafayette
78.845–
78.918
126.889–
127.006
Bridge over Bayou Vermilion (or Vermilion River)
79.205 127.468 LA 82 (North State Street) – Perry, Intracoastal City

LA 82 Truck
Northern terminus of LA 82 Truck; west end of LA 82 Truck concurrency
80.353 129.316 LA 338 (North John M. Hardy Drive, Lafitte Road)
81.228 130.724
LA 14 Bus. west (Charity Street)
Eastern terminus of LA 14 Bus.
81.984 131.940
LA 3267 / LA 82 Truck south (South Airport Road)
Eastern terminus of LA 3267; east end of LA 82 Truck concurrency
Erath 84.048 135.262
LA 14 Bus. east
Western terminus of LA 14 Bus.
86.139 138.627 LA 339 – Youngsville, Lafayette
86.538 139.269
LA 14 Bus. west
Eastern terminus of LA 14 Bus.
Delcambre 87.826 141.342 LA 89 north – Lozes, Youngsville Southern terminus of LA 89
Iberia 88.371 142.219 LA 330 (North Railroad Street) Eastern terminus of LA 330
88.683–
88.724
142.721–
142.787
Bridge over Delcambre Canal (or Bayou Carlin)
95.095 153.041 LA 676 (Valery Road) Eastern terminus of LA 676
New Iberia 96.876–
97.112
155.907–
156.287
US 90 – Morgan City, Lafayette Exit 128A on US 90
97.792 157.381 LA 329 south (Avery Island Road) – Avery Island Northern terminus of LA 329; location also known as Brannon
98.114 157.899 LA 83 (Weeks Island Road) – Lydia, Weeks Island Northern terminus of LA 83
98.729 158.889 LA 674 (East Admiral Doyle Drive) – Jeanerette
99.973–
100.096
160.891–
161.089
LA 182 east (East St. Peter Street) – Jeanerette, Franklin
LA 182 west (East Main Street) – Lafayette
Eastern terminus; one-way couplet
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Auxiliary routes[edit]

Abbeville business route[edit]


Louisiana Highway 14 Business
Location: Abbeville
Length: 3.895 mi[1] (6.268 km)
Existed: 2013–present

Louisiana Highway 14 Business (LA 14 Bus.) runs 3.90 miles (6.28 km) in an east–west direction through Abbeville, a city in Vermilion Parish.[1][41] The highway follows the original route of LA 14 through the downtown area, traversing a narrow two-lane vertical lift bridge across Bayou Vermilion and navigating around two town squares located only one block apart.

LA 14 Bus. branches off of mainline LA 14 (West Summers Drive) just inside the Abbeville city limits and travels along Port Street. Just before reaching Bayou Vermilion, also known as the Vermilion River, LA 14 Bus. intersects US 167 (Park Avenue) at the latter's southern terminus. It then crosses a vertical lift bridge over the bayou and into downtown Abbeville. Over the next several blocks, the route forms the northern border of the city's Historic District, passing many of its historic landmarks and government buildings. After briefly traveling along Pere Magret Street, the highway separates into a one-way couplet around Magdalen Square, located between Washington and Jefferson Streets. It then travels for one block along Concord Street before separating again to travel around the courthouse square with east and westbound traffic following Peace and Tivoli Streets, respectively. The courthouse square also marks an intersection with LA 82, which follows the one-way couplet of St. Charles and State Streets north toward Lafayette. To the south, State Street carries two-way traffic for southbound LA 82 toward Perry and Intracoastal City. LA 14 Bus. proceeds along Charity Street and gains a center turning lane. After passing LA 338 (North John M. Hardy Drive), the highway widens to four lanes with center lane intact. Several blocks later, LA 14 Bus. rejoins the mainline route just to the west of Abbeville Chris Crusta Memorial Airport.[8][9][41]

LA 14 Bus. is classified as an urban principal arterial by the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (La DOTD). The average daily traffic in 2013 ranged from 2,800 to 10,600 vehicles compared to about double that number on the mainline route.[11] The posted speed limit ranges from 35 mph (55 km/h) in the downtown area to 50 mph (80 km/h) further east.[41]

Prior to 1955, the route was part of State Route 25.[8][18] It became part of the original route of LA 14 with the 1955 Louisiana Highway renumbering[26][42] and remained the principal east–west highway through Abbeville until the construction of LA 14 Byp. around the north side of town in the mid-1960s. The old route was eventually signed in the field as LA 14 Bus., which became official in 2013 when the bypass designation was dropped from what is now the mainline route.[1]

The entire highway is in Abbeville, Vermilion Parish.

mi[1] km Destinations Notes
0.000–
0.306
0.000–
0.492
LA 14 (West Summers Drive) Western terminus
1.375 2.213 US 167 north (Park Avenue) – Lafayette Southern terminus of US 167
1.426 2.295 LA 335 west Eastern terminus of LA 335
1.506–
1.552
2.424–
2.498
Bridge over Bayou Vermilion (or Vermilion River)
1.834–
1.918
2.952–
3.087
LA 82 north (North St. Charles Street, North State Street) – Lafayette
LA 82 south (South State Street) – Perry, Intracoastal City
One-way couplet on northbound LA 82
3.160 5.086 LA 338 (North John M. Hardy Drive) Southern terminus of LA 338
3.895 6.268
LA 14 / LA 82 Truck (Veterans Memorial Drive)
Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Erath business route[edit]


Louisiana Highway 14 Business
Location: Erath
Length: 2.420 mi[1] (3.895 km)
Existed: c. 1999–present

Louisiana Highway 14 Business (LA 14 Bus.) runs 2.42 miles (3.89 km) in an east–west direction through Erath, a town in Vermilion Parish.[1][43] It follows the original route of LA 14 through Erath before the construction of a bypass just to the north during the late 1990s.

From the west, LA 14 Bus. begins at an intersection with LA 14 (Veterans Memorial Drive) at the western edge of town. It heads eastward on West Lastie Street along the Louisiana and Delta Railroad (LDRR) tracks. After crossing a bridge over a small waterway, the route passes through the commercial center of town and intersects two state highways located one block apart. They are LA 331 and LA 685, which both lead to rural areas south of town. At the eastern edge of Erath, LA 14 Bus. intersects LA 339, which heads north toward Youngsville. Shortly afterward, the highway reaches its eastern terminus as it reconnects with the mainline route.[8][9][43]

LA 14 Bus. is an undivided two-lane highway for its entire length.[11] It is classified as an urban minor arterial by the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (La DOTD). The average daily traffic volume in 2013 was reported as 4,500 vehicles.[11] The posted speed limit is 45 mph (70 km/h).[43]

Prior to 1955, the route was part of State Route 25.[8][18] It became part of the original route of LA 14 with the 1955 Louisiana Highway renumbering[26][42] and remained so until the late 1990s. At this time, a slight northern bypass of Erath was opened as part of a project to widen LA 14 to four lanes between Abbeville and Delcambre. The bypass was opposed by many officials and residents of Erath who feared that it would be detrimental to the businesses in the town. However, the state highway department claimed it was necessary because the highway's proximity to the parallel rail line would not allow for a four-lane corridor.[44] Upon its completion, the bypass was designated as the mainline route of LA 14 with the original route retained in the state highway system as a business route.[8]

The entire highway is in Vermilion Parish.

Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Erath 0.000 0.000 LA 14 (Veterans Memorial Drive) – Abbeville, New Iberia Western terminus
1.318 2.121 LA 331 (South Kibbe Street) – Boston, Henry Northern terminus of LA 331
1.405 2.261 LA 685 (South Broadway Street) Northern terminus of LA 685
2.119 3.410 LA 339 – Youngsville, Lafayette Southern terminus of LA 339
2.420 3.895 LA 14 (Veterans Memorial Drive) – Abbeville, New Iberia Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Abbeville bypass route[edit]


Louisiana Highway 14 Bypass
Location: Abbeville
Length: 3.450 mi[1] (5.552 km)
Existed: c. 1966–2013

Louisiana Highway 14 Bypass (LA 14 Byp.) ran 3.45 miles (5.55 km) in an east–west direction through Abbeville, a city in Vermilion Parish.[1][45] The highway provided a bypass of the downtown area for truck traffic and other through traffic prior to being signed as the mainline route in 2013. The former mainline route, now signed as a business route, traverses a narrow two-lane vertical lift bridge across Bayou Vermilion. It then navigates around two town squares located only one block apart. The bypass was constructed in the mid-1960s to alleviate traffic through the downtown area, but it has since been blamed as a factor in its decline.[46]

From the west, LA 14 Byp. began at an intersection with its parent route on the west side of Abbeville. It headed east, almost immediately widening from an undivided two-lane highway to a four-lane highway with a center turning lane. After a short distance, the highway intersected US 167 (Park Avenue), which heads north toward Lafayette. It then crossed a wide vertical lift bridge over Bayou Vermilion, also known as the Vermilion River. Now passing to the north of the downtown area, LA 14 Byp. intersected LA 82 (North State Street), connecting with points south of town such as Perry and Intracoastal City. Passing through a mixed residential and commercial area, the highway intersected LA 338 and curved southeast to reconnect with the mainline route on the east side of town.[8][9]

LA 14 Byp. was classified as an urban principal arterial by the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (La DOTD). The average daily traffic in 2013 ranged from 9,000 to 20,700 vehicles compared to about half that number on the mainline (now business) route.[11] The posted speed limit was 45 mph (70 km/h).[43]

The entire highway was in Abbeville, Vermilion Parish.

mi[1] km Destinations Notes
0.000 0.000 LA 14 west (West Summers Drive) – Kaplan, Gueydan
LA 14 east (Port Street)
Western terminus
0.977 1.572 US 167 (Park Avenue) – Lafayette
1.071–
1.145
1.724–
1.843
Bridge over Bayou Vermilion (or Vermilion River)
1.431 2.303 LA 82 (North State Street) – Perry, Intracoastal City

LA 82 Truck
Northern terminus of LA 82 Truck; west end of LA 82 Truck concurrency
2.579 4.150 LA 338 (North John M. Hardy Drive, Lafitte Road)
3.450 5.552 LA 14 west (Charity Street)

LA 14 east / LA 82 Truck south (Veterans Memorial Drive) – Delcambre, New Iberia
Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "La DOTD GIS Data". Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. September 2015. Retrieved May 6, 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Google (July 12, 2015). "Overview Map of LA 14" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved July 12, 2015. 
  3. ^ Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development Office of Multimodal Planning (February 2012). Calcasieu Parish (East Section) (PDF) (Map). Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. Retrieved July 12, 2015. 
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  43. ^ a b c d Google (July 12, 2015). "Overview Map of LA 14 Business" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved July 12, 2015. 
  44. ^ "4-laning La. 14 to start this summer". The Advocate. Baton Rouge. February 18, 1997. Retrieved July 12, 2015. (Subscription required (help)). 
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  46. ^ "LRA shows off plan for Vermilion towns". The Advocate. Baton Rouge. February 20, 2006. Retrieved July 12, 2015. (Subscription required (help)). 

External links[edit]

Route map: Bing / Google

KML is from Wikidata