Louisiana Highway 40

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Louisiana Highway 40 marker

Louisiana Highway 40
Route of LA 40 highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by Louisiana DOTD
Length: 53.108 mi[1] (85.469 km)
Existed: 1955 renumbering – present
Major junctions
West end: LA 43 south of Montpelier
 
East end: LA 41 in Bush
Location
Parishes: Livingston, Tangipahoa, St. Tammany
Highway system
  • Louisiana Highway System
LA 39 LA 41

Louisiana Highway 40 (LA 40) is a state highway located in southeastern Louisiana. It runs 53.11 miles (85.47 km) in an east–west direction from LA 43 south of Montpelier to LA 41 in Bush.

The route travels through the rural area between the parallel corridors of U.S. Highway 190 (US 190) and LA 21 to the south and LA 16 to the north. It connects several small population centers in Tangipahoa and St. Tammany parishes. These include the town of Independence, the village of Folsom, and the unincorporated communities of Loranger and Bush. LA 40 also connects Independence with Interstate 55 (I-55), the area's primary route to the New Orleans area. Further east, the highway provides access to the Global Wildlife Center, a popular wildlife and game preserve located west of Folsom.

LA 40 was designated in the 1955 Louisiana Highway renumbering from portions of several former routes, primarily State Route 408, State Route 1080, and State Route 189. Two portions of LA 40 are scheduled to be eliminated from the state highway system in the future as part of the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (La DOTD) Road Transfer Program.

Route description[edit]

Livingston Parish to Folsom[edit]

From the west, LA 40 begins at a junction with LA 43 between Montpelier and Albany in the northeast corner of Livingston. The highway crosses into Tangipahoa Parish after a short distance and passes through an interchange with I-55 (exit 40) just west of Independence. I-55 connects with Hammond, Louisiana to the south and Jackson, Mississippi to the north. LA 40 heads into town and follows West 3rd Street to a junction with US 51 (West Railroad Avenue), which serves local traffic along the I-55 corridor.[2][3][4][5]

Immediately after crossing US 51, LA 40 crosses the Canadian National Railway (CN) line at grade and zigzags south and east out of Independence. The highway then crosses a bridge over the Tangipahoa River and intersects LA 1054. In the community of Loranger, LA 40 turns south at a junction with LA 1062. Over the next 12 miles (19 km), the highway zigzags along section line roads but maintains a general eastward trajectory. During this stretch are intersections with minor rural routes, such as LA 442, LA 443, and LA 445, which connect to more populated areas along US 51 and US 190. Traveling through an area known as Uneedus, LA 40 passes the entrance to the Global Wildlife Center, a non-profit wildlife preserve open to the public.[2][4][5][6]

Folsom to Bush[edit]

LA 40 crosses the Tchefuncte River into St. Tammany Parish and proceeds into the village of Folsom. The highway follows Garfield Street to a junction with LA 25 (Orange Street) in the center of town, connecting with the cities of Covington and Franklinton. LA 40 zigzags north onto LA 25 for two blocks before turning east onto Cleveland Street to exit the village. The highway then follows a more winding path for the remainder of its journey.[2][5][7]

Heading southeast from Folsom, LA 40 begins a concurrency with LA 437 that ends when the latter turns south onto Lee Road in a populated rural area north of Covington. LA 40 makes a zigzag past Lee Road Junior High School then turns northeast for about five miles (8.0 km). Resuming its eastward course, LA 40 intersects two minor rural routes, LA 1082 and LA 1083. Near the end of its route, the highway makes a final zigzag via LA 21 in the unincorporated community of Bush. It then continues a short distance further to a T-intersection with LA 41, which turns north onto a divided-four lane alignment heading toward the city of Bogalusa.[2][5][7][8]

Route classification and data[edit]

LA 40 is classified by the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (La DOTD) as a rural major collector west of Lee Road (LA 437 south) and as a rural minor collector between Lee Road and Bush. Daily traffic volume in 2013 peaked at 11,700 vehicles in Folsom and 8,200 vehicles between I-55 and Independence. The lowest figure was reported near the eastern terminus in Bush with an average of 1,460 vehicles daily.[9] The posted speed limit is generally 55 mph (90 km/h) in rural areas, reduced as low as 35 mph (55 km/h) through town.[2] LA 40 is an undivided two-lane highway for its entire length.[2]

History[edit]

In the original Louisiana Highway system in use between 1921 and 1955, the modern LA 40 was part of several different routes, primarily State Route 408 from the western terminus to Loranger;[10][11] State Route 1080 from Loranger to the Tangipahoa–St. Tammany parish line;[11][12] and State Route 189 from the parish line to Bush.[12] All three routes were added to the state highway system between 1928 and 1930.[13][14] The portion of LA 40 running one mile (1.6 km) south from Loranger was technically part of State Route 229, which was supposed to turn east across Chappapella Creek but was never completed.[11][13] The next mile was taken into the system later as State Route C-2021.[11][15] This provided a connection to Route 1080, which did exist, and completed a state-maintained route between Loranger and Tickfaw. Finally, the easternmost mile of LA 40 was actually a spur of State Route 484 created when State Route 7 (the modern LA 21) was straightened through Bush.[12][16]

LA 40 was created in the 1955 Louisiana Highway renumbering, giving a single route number to the east–west corridor in Tangipahoa and St. Tammany parishes between LA 16 and US 190/LA 21.[17]

Class "B": La 40—From a junction with La 43 at or near Georgeville through or near Independence and Loranger to a junction with La 25 at or near Folsom.
Class "C": La 40—From a junction with La 25 at or near Folsom through or near Blond and Pilgrims Rest to a junction with La 21 west of Bush and from a junction with La 21 to a junction with La 41 at or near Bush.

— 1955 legislative route description[17]

With the 1955 renumbering, the state highway department initially categorized all routes into three classes: "A" (primary), "B" (secondary), and "C" (farm-to-market).[18] This system has since been updated and replaced by a more specific functional classification system.

The route has seen only minor changes over the years. A small realignment occurred to accommodate the construction of the I-55 interchange west of Independence in 1969.[19][20] The original path of LA 40 here exists as two dead-end local roads on either side of the interstate called Fontana Lane and Old Highway 40.[2] Another realignment shifted the highway's zigzag in Folsom east two blocks, creating the concurrency with LA 25. Originally, LA 40 turned north from Garfield Street onto Olive Street, then followed Cleveland Street straight across LA 25.[21]

Future[edit]

La DOTD is currently engaged in a program that aims to transfer about 5,000 miles (8,000 km) of state-owned roadways to local governments over the next several years.[22] Under this plan of "right-sizing" the state highway system, two portions of LA 40 are proposed for deletion as they no longer meet a significant interurban travel function. These include the portion from I-55 west of Independence to the junction with LA 442/LA 443 south of Loranger[23][24] and the easternmost portion of the route between LA 21 and LA 41 in Bush.[25]

Major intersections[edit]

Parish Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Livingston 0.000 0.000 LA 43 – Montpelier, Albany Western terminus
Tangipahoa 5.477–
5.938
8.814–
9.556
I-55 – Hammond, Jackson Exit 40 on I-55
Independence 7.204 11.594 US 51 (West Railroad Avenue) – Hammond, Amite City
8.513–
8.629
13.700–
13.887
Bridge over Tangipahoa River
9.143 14.714 LA 1054 north Southern terminus of LA 1054
Loranger 13.822 22.244 LA 1062 north – Husser Western terminus of LA 1062
15.731 25.317 LA 442 west – Tickfaw
LA 443 south – Hammond
Eastern terminus of LA 442; northern terminus of LA 443
20.816 33.500 LA 445 south – Robert West end of LA 445 concurrency
21.806 35.093 LA 445 north – Husser East end of LA 445 concurrency
TangipahoaSt. Tammany
parish line
25.742–
25.806
41.428–
41.531
Bridge over Tchefuncte River
St. Tammany Folsom 29.954 48.206 LA 25 south (Orange Street) – Covington West end of LA 25 concurrency
30.094 48.432 LA 25 north (Orange Street) – Franklinton East end of LA 25 concurrency
34.751–
34.811
55.926–
56.023
LA 437 north (Middle Road) – Enon West end of LA 437 concurrency
38.298 61.635 LA 437 south (Lee Road) – Covington East end of LA 437 concurrency
38.670 62.233 LA 1129 north (Lee Road) Southern terminus of LA 1129
44.928 72.305 LA 1082 south (Old Military Road) Northern terminus of LA 1082
46.685 75.132 LA 1083 south (Ben Williams Road) Northern terminus of LA 1083
Bush 51.571 82.995 LA 21 south – Covington West end of LA 21 concurrency
52.071 83.800 LA 21 north – Bogalusa East end of LA 21 concurrency
53.108 85.469 LA 41 – Bogalusa, Pearl River Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "La DOTD GIS Data". Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. September 2015. Retrieved June 5, 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Google (June 8, 2016). "Overview Map of LA 40" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved June 8, 2016. 
  3. ^ Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development, Office of Multimodal Planning (February 2012). Livingston Parish (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. Retrieved June 8, 2016. 
  4. ^ a b Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development, Office of Multimodal Planning (February 2012). Tangipahoa Parish (North Section) (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. Retrieved June 8, 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c d Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development, Office of Multimodal Planning (February 2012). District 62: Official Control Section Map, Construction and Maintenance (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. Retrieved June 8, 2016. 
  6. ^ Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development, Office of Multimodal Planning (February 2012). Tangipahoa Parish (South Section) (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. Retrieved June 8, 2016. 
  7. ^ a b Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development, Office of Multimodal Planning (February 2012). St. Tammany Parish (West Section) (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. Retrieved June 8, 2016. 
  8. ^ Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development, Office of Multimodal Planning (February 2012). St. Tammany Parish (East Section) (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. Retrieved June 8, 2016. 
  9. ^ "La DOTD GIS". Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. 2013. Archived from the original on October 16, 2013. Retrieved August 30, 2013. 
  10. ^ Louisiana Department of Highways, Traffic and Planning Section (1947). Livingston Parish (Map) (January 1, 1955 ed.). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Highways. 
  11. ^ a b c d Louisiana Department of Highways, Traffic and Planning Section (1952). Tangipahoa Parish (Map) (January 1, 1955 ed.). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Highways. 
  12. ^ a b c Louisiana Department of Highways, Traffic and Planning Section (1953). St. Tammany Parish (North Section) (Map) (January 1, 1955 ed.). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Highways. 
  13. ^ a b "Act No. 294, House Bill No. 791". The State-Times. Baton Rouge. July 30, 1928. pp. 10B–11B. 
  14. ^ "Act No. 15, House Bill No. 6". The State-Times. Baton Rouge. October 13, 1930. p. 8B. 
  15. ^ Louisiana Highway Commission, State Wide Highway Planning Survey (1937). Tangipahoa Parish (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Highway Commission. 
  16. ^ Louisiana Highway Commission, Photo-Map Department (February 1930). St. Tammany Parish (Map) (c. June 1931 ed.). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Highway Commission. 
  17. ^ a b "Act No. 40, House Bill No. 311". State-Times. Baton Rouge. June 18, 1955. p. 3B. 
  18. ^ "Engineering Directives and Standards: Authorization and Definition of the State Highway System". Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. January 18, 2011. Retrieved August 15, 2013. 
  19. ^ Louisiana Department of Highways, Traffic and Planning Section (1952). Tangipahoa Parish (Map) (January 1, 1958 ed.). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Highways. 
  20. ^ Hughes, Don (February 9, 1969). "Roseland, Hammond Link May Be Opened in August". The Times-Picayune. New Orleans. p. 28. 
  21. ^ Louisiana Department of Highways, Traffic and Planning Section (1953). St. Tammany Parish (North Section) (Map) (January 1, 1958 ed.). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Highways. 
  22. ^ "Right-Sizing the State Highway System" (PDF). Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. April 2013. p. 3. Retrieved July 25, 2013. 
  23. ^ Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development, Office of Multimodal Planning (March 2, 2017). Right-Size the State Highway System: Tangipahoa Parish (North Section) (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. Retrieved June 14, 2017. 
  24. ^ Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development, Office of Multimodal Planning (March 2, 2017). Right-Size the State Highway System: Tangipahoa Parish (South Section) (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. Retrieved June 14, 2017. 
  25. ^ Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development, Office of Multimodal Planning (March 2, 2017). Right-Size the State Highway System: St. Tammany Parish (East Section) (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. Retrieved June 14, 2017. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Google

KML is from Wikidata