Louisiana Highway 94

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Louisiana Highway 94 marker

Louisiana Highway 94
Route of LA 94 highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by Louisiana DOTD
Length8.003 mi[1] (12.880 km)
Existed1955 renumbering–present
Major junctions
West end US 90 / US 167 in Lafayette
  LA 31 in Breaux Bridge
East end LA 328 in Breaux Bridge
Location
ParishesLafayette, St. Martin
Highway system
  • Louisiana Highway System
LA 93LA 95

Louisiana Highway 94 (LA 94) is a state highway located in southern Louisiana. It runs 8.00 miles (12.87 km) in an east–west direction from the junction of U.S. Highway 90 (US 90) and U.S. Highway 167 (US 167) in Lafayette to LA 328 in Breaux Bridge.

The highway connects Lafayette, the parish seat and largest city in Lafayette Parish, with the small city of Breaux Bridge in neighboring St. Martin Parish. The entire route parallels Interstate 10 (I-10), which is located an average of about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) to the north and continues eastward toward Baton Rouge, the state capital. LA 94 is also signed as an alternate route to I-10 when the interstate is closed due to traffic accidents or construction work. Though it is a distinct east–west route, the signage for LA 94 carries no directional banners.

Route description[edit]

From the west, LA 94 begins at an intersection with the Evangeline Thruway, a couplet of one-way streets that carries both US 90 and US 167 in Lafayette. US 90 and US 167 travel north from this intersection toward an interchange with I-10 and I-49, the latter connecting to Opelousas. On the south side, US 90 heads alone on Evangeline Thruway toward New Iberia as US 167 turns southwest onto Johnston Street toward Abbeville. Directly opposite Johnston Street, LA 94 proceeds northeast on Louisiana Avenue as an undivided four-lane highway. The route travels through a largely residential neighborhood, crossing East Simcoe Street and Mudd Avenue.[2][3][4]

Shortly afterward, LA 94 turns east onto Carmel Drive opposite the Lafayette City Park, becoming an undivided two-lane highway. (Westbound traffic from Breaux Bridge following the I-10 alternate route is directed to turn north from Carmel Drive onto Louisiana Avenue to rejoin the interstate.) After crossing East Pinhook Road, the roadway widens to accommodate a center turning lane and crosses out of the Lafayette city limits. It then curves to the northeast and intersects LA 353 (Lake Martin Road), which heads southeast toward Lake Martin and Cypress Island. Narrowing again to two lanes, LA 94 continues northeast for 1.0 mile (1.6 km) where it crosses a bridge over Bayou Tortue and enters St. Martin Parish.[2][3][4]

LA 94 heads northeast through rural St. Martin Parish for 2.6 miles (4.2 km) before entering the city of Breaux Bridge, where it becomes known as West Mills Avenue. The surroundings remain largely rural, transitioning to scattered light industrial and commercial services after the route crosses the Louisiana and Delta Railroad (LDRR) line. The center turning lane reappears, and the highway crosses a second railroad line at grade. LA 94 then intersects LA 31 (Berard Street), which parallels the west bank of Bayou Teche. LA 31 serves as the principal north–south highway of St. Martin Parish and connects to St. Martinville, the parish seat. LA 94 proceeds northeast, crossing a bridge over the bayou, and ends shortly afterward at an intersection with LA 328 (Rees Street). LA 328 parallels the east bank of Bayou Teche and connects to I-10 and the community of Cecilia to the north.[2][4][5]

The route is classified as an urban principal arterial by the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (La DOTD).[6] The average daily traffic volume in 2013 is reported as between 12,100 and 14,300 vehicles for the majority of the route. The section along Carmel Drive within the Lafayette city limits has a higher average of 19,700 while an adjoining section on Louisiana Avenue has an anomalously low count of 6,300.[6][2] The route has a posted speed limit of 35 mph (55 km/h) in Lafayette, increasing to 45 mph (70 km/h) at the city limits. The speed limit is 55 mph (90 km/h) through most of St. Martin Parish, decreasing to 40 miles per hour (65 km/h) as it approaches LA 31.[2]

History[edit]

In the original Louisiana Highway system in use between 1921 and 1955, the modern LA 94 made up the northern portion of State Route 43.[7][8] As originally designated in 1921, Route 43 continued southward along the present route of US 167 from Lafayette to Abbeville.[9][10][11] Five years later, the route was extended to the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway south of Abbeville.[11] The entire section of Route 43 between Lafayette and Abbeville became co-signed with US 167 in 1949 when that highway was extended south from Alexandria over existing state highways.[12][13]

LA 94 was created with the 1955 Louisiana Highway renumbering following the former State Route 43 from Lafayette eastward to Breaux Bridge.[14]

La 94—From a junction with La-US 167 at or near Lafayette to a junction with La 31 at or near Breaux Bridge.

— 1955 legislative route description[14]

Lengthy route concurrencies were eliminated in the renumbering, and the Lafayette–Abbeville highway was retained as US 167 only.[15][16] The portion of former Route 43 from Abbeville south to Esther became part of LA 82. The remainder of the route south to the Intracoastal Waterway was designated as LA 333.[16]

Alignment changes[edit]

Since its creation, LA 94 has seen only minor changes affecting its western and eastern ends. The original western terminus in Lafayette was located at the present junction of US 90 (Cameron Street) and US 90 Business/LA 182 (University Avenue). At the time, US 90 turned south at this intersection and followed the current business route through the downtown area. LA 94 followed the current route of US 90 east along Cameron Street. It then made a zigzag south onto St. John Street and east onto Simcoe Street, crossing what later became the Evangeline Thruway and joining the present alignment at Louisiana Avenue.[3][15]

Around 1964, US 90 and US 167 were relocated onto the Evangeline Thruway, and the western terminus of LA 94 was truncated to the intersection of Evangeline Thruway and East Simcoe Street.[17][18] The section of LA 94 that became US 90 was streamlined in the early 1970s with Cameron Street now transitioning onto Mudd Avenue, two blocks north of Simcoe Street, to reach Evangeline Thruway.[19][20] However, LA 94 was not relocated onto Mudd Avenue east of Evangeline Thruway, creating a jog in the state-maintained connection between US 90 west and LA 94 east.

More recently, East Simcoe Street was returned to local control, and the western terminus of LA 94 was moved again to its present location. LA 94 now follows Louisiana Avenue directly from Evangeline Thruway across East Simcoe Street.[3] This route was formerly LA 3138, a short connector added in the late 1970s providing a direct state-maintained connection between LA 94 and US 167 south.[20][21]

In Breaux Bridge, the eastern terminus of LA 94 was originally located at LA 31 on the west bank of Bayou Teche.[22] Motorists wishing to cross the bayou had to turn southeast onto LA 31 and utilize the nearby bridge crossing on either LA 336-1 or LA 336-2. In the early 1980s, a new bridge was constructed across Bayou Teche, allowing the direct extension of LA 94 to LA 328, its current eastern terminus.[23][24]

Major intersections[edit]

ParishLocationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
LafayetteLafayette0.0000.000 US 90 / US 167 north (Evangeline Thruway) to I-10 / I-49 – Opelousas, New Iberia
US 167 south (Johnston Street) – Abbeville
Western terminus; one-way pair on Evangeline Thruway
0.8461.362Louisiana Avenue to I-10 / I-49Signed westbound to direct traffic following I-10 Alternate Route
2.3023.705 LA 353 (Lake Martin Road) – Lake Martin, Cypress IslandNorthern terminus of LA 353
St. MartinBreaux Bridge7.391–
7.435
11.895–
11.965
LA 31 (Berard Street) – Breaux Bridge
8.00312.880 LA 328 (Rees Street) to I-10 – CeciliaEastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "La DOTD GIS Data". Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. September 2015. Retrieved May 21, 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d e Google (August 11, 2013). "Overview Map of LA 94" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved August 11, 2013.
  3. ^ a b c d Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development, Office of Multimodal Planning (February 2012). Lafayette Parish (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. Retrieved August 11, 2013.
  4. ^ a b c Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development, Office of Multimodal Planning (February 2012). District 03: Official Control Section Map, Construction and Maintenance (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. Retrieved August 11, 2013.
  5. ^ Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development, Office of Multimodal Planning (February 2012). St. Martin Parish (Northwest Section) (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. Retrieved August 11, 2013.
  6. ^ a b "La DOTD GIS". Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. 2013. Archived from the original on October 16, 2013. Retrieved August 11, 2013.
  7. ^ Louisiana Department of Highways, Traffic and Planning Section (1953). Lafayette Parish (Map) (January 1, 1955 ed.). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Highways.
  8. ^ Louisiana Department of Highways, Traffic and Planning Section (1950). St. Martin Parish (Map) (January 1, 1955 ed.). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Highways.
  9. ^ "Act No. 95, House Bill No. 206". State-Times. Baton Rouge. November 29, 1921. p. 9.
  10. ^ Louisiana Highway Commission, Photo-Map Department (January 1930). Lafayette Parish (Map) (c. June 1931 ed.). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Highway Commission.
  11. ^ a b Louisiana Highway Commission, Photo-Map Department (July 1930). Vermilion Parish (Map) (June 4, 1931 ed.). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Highway Commission.
  12. ^ Louisiana Department of Highways (1948). Louisiana (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Highways.
  13. ^ Louisiana Department of Highways (1949). Louisiana 1949 (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Highways.
  14. ^ a b "Act No. 40, House Bill No. 311". State-Times. Baton Rouge. June 18, 1955. p. 3B.
  15. ^ a b Louisiana Department of Highways, Traffic and Planning Section (1953). Lafayette Parish (Map) (January 1, 1958 ed.). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Highways.
  16. ^ a b Louisiana Department of Highways, Traffic and Planning Section (1950). Vermilion Parish (North Section) (Map) (January 1, 1958 ed.). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Highways.
  17. ^ Louisiana Department of Highways (June 1, 1963). Louisiana (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Highways.
  18. ^ Louisiana Department of Highways (1966). Louisiana (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Highways.
  19. ^ Louisiana Department of Highways (1971). Louisiana 1971 (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Highways.
  20. ^ a b Louisiana Department of Highways (1976). Louisiana 1976 (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Highways.
  21. ^ Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development—Office of Highways (1979). Louisiana 1979–1980 (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development.
  22. ^ Louisiana Department of Highways, Traffic and Planning Section (1950). St. Martin Parish (Map) (January 1, 1958 ed.). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Highways.
  23. ^ Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (1981). Louisiana (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development.
  24. ^ Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (1983). Louisiana: A Dream State (Map). Scale not given. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development.

External links[edit]

Route map:

KML is from Wikidata