Louisiana Office of Juvenile Justice

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The Louisiana Office of Juvenile Justice (OJJ) a cabinet-level Louisiana state agency that provides youth corrections services in the state.

The full official title of the agency is Department of Public Safety and Corrections, Youth Services, Office of Juvenile Justice (DPSC/YS/OJJ).[1] The agency has its headquarters in the first floor of the State Police Building in Baton Rouge.[2]

The agency's current head is Dr. James Bueche.

History[edit]

The Louisiana Department of Public Safety and Corrections previously handled the care of juvenile prisoners.[3] In 2003 the Louisiana Legislature voted to turn the department's juvenile division into a cabinet level agency.[4]

In 2004 the juvenile system separated from the adult system.[5] It was established as the Office of Youth Development (OYD), and it was given its current name by the Louisiana Legislature in 2008.[6]

Beginning with the creation of the OJJ, the agency adopted a model used by the Missouri Division of Youth Services, the youth corrections agency of Missouri. The OJJ worked together with that agency and the Annie E. Casey Foundation.[4]

Institutions[edit]

Louisiana Office of Juvenile Justice is located in Louisiana
BCCY
BCCY
JCY (closed)
JCY (closed)
SCY-Monroe
SCY-Monroe
SCY-Columbia
SCY-Columbia
WYC (♀)
WYC (♀)
OJJ secure facilities

The state operates three secure institutions for boys.[1]

The male institutions include:

  • Bridge City Center for Youth (BCCY) - Bridge City, unincorporated Jefferson Parish[7]
    • Riverside Alternative High School is located at BCCY.[8]
    • By 2005 the center gained a "family intervention room."[9] Around that time the center was being designed around the Missouri model, but staffing issues and issues with inmate behavior remained as of 2012. Turnover occurs since jobs with less stress but the same pay scale exist in the New Orleans metropolitan area, where Bridge City is situated.[10]
  • A. L. Swanson, Sr. Center for Youth (SCY) - Monroe[11]
    • Southside Alternative High School is located at SCY.[11]
    • There is a branch center, Swanson Center for Youth at Columbia, which opened in 2013 in the former Columbia Community Residential and Employment Services (CCRES) center for disabled persons.[12]
  • Acadiana Center for Youth (ACY) - Bunkie
    • In August 2014 construction began, and it is scheduled to open in 2019. It is on 20 acres (8.1 ha) of former agricultural land off of U.S. Highway 71.[13]

The OJJ uses the Ware Youth Center by contract to house adjudicated secure girls in an "intensive residential" program.[14] It is located in unincorporated Red River Parish,[15] about 3.5 kilometres (2.2 mi) from Coushatta.

Former institutions[edit]

Former male institutions:

Previously girls were housed in the Florida Parishes Detention Center in Covington, and the Terrebonne Detention Center in Houma.[17]

Non-Secure Programs[edit]

OJJ's philosophy is to match adjudicated youth to programs to meet their needs. Some youth, while not amenable to treatment in the community, are not a risk to public safety or in dire need of treatment in a secure environment. OJJ contracts with community treatment providers in non-secure, residential settings (group homes and therapeutic foster care) to place adjudicated youth into. These group homes are located in various places throughout the state.

Probation/Parole Services[edit]

OJJ is also tasked with the responsibility of providing probation and parole supervision for adjudicated youth throughout the state. There are 11 regional offices located in:

Northern Region:

  • Shreveport
  • Tallulah
  • Monroe

Southeast Region:

  • Thibodeaux
  • New Orleans
  • Hammond
  • Baton Rouge

Central/Southwest Region:

  • Alexandria
  • Lake Charles
  • Lafayette (which had a satellite office in Opelousas up until 2016, when it closed and consolidated with Lafayette)
  • Natchitoches

Probation and Parole Officers are Peace Officers and Standards Training certified (P.O.S.T) and have arresting authority in the state.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Home." Louisiana Office of Juvenile Justice. Retrieved on June 30, 2010.
  2. ^ "Contact Us." Louisiana Office of Juvenile Justice. Retrieved on June 30, 2010. "Office of Juvenile Justice State Police Bldg. 1st Floor 7919 Independence Blvd Baton Rouge, La. 70806"
  3. ^ "Institution Index." Louisiana Department of Public Safety and Corrections. February 10, 2001. Retrieved on September 23, 2010.
  4. ^ a b McGaughy, Lauren. "Louisiana juvenile justice official apologizes for those 'hurt' by Jetson Center closure" (Archive). New Orleans Times Picayune. February 20, 2014. Retrieved on December 18, 2015.
  5. ^ "History of Juvenile Justice in La." Louisiana Office of Juvenile Justice. Retrieved on September 23, 2010.
  6. ^ a b "Jetson Center for Youth’s Residents Re-located to Other OJJ Secure Facilities Last Night" (Archive). Louisiana Office of Juvenile Justice. January 26, 2014. Retrieved on December 17, 2015.
  7. ^ "Bridge City Center for Youth." Louisiana Office of Juvenile Justice. Retrieved on June 30, 2010.
  8. ^ "Dr. Roy L. Higgins named Principal of BCCY / Riverside Alternative High School." Louisiana Office of Juvenile Justice. July 1, 2010. Retrieved on August 30, 2010.
  9. ^ Gyan, Joe Jr. "Juvenile facility changes begin Homelike dorms among Bridge City projects." The Advocate. July 15, 2005. News 1 B.S. Retrieved on August 30, 2010.
  10. ^ Maggi, Laura. "Bridge City youth center, once a model correctional facility, is far from it now" (Archive). The Times Picayune. April 29, 2012. Retrieved on December 19, 2015.
  11. ^ a b "Swanson Center for Youth." Louisiana Office of Juvenile Justice. Retrieved on June 30, 2010.
  12. ^ "Swanson Center for Youth at Columbia." Louisiana Office of Juvenile Justice. Retrieved on December 17, 2015. "132 Hwy 850, Columbia, LA 71418 (physical address)"
  13. ^ "Acadiana Center for Youth (ACY)." Louisiana Office of Juvenile Justice. Retrieved on December 17, 2015.
  14. ^ "Girls Secure Care Archived 2009-05-05 at the Wayback Machine." Louisiana Office of Juvenile Justice. Retrieved on June 30, 2010.
  15. ^ "Contact Us." Ware Youth Center. Retrieved on December 19, 2015. "Address 3565 Highway 71 Coushatta, Louisiana 71019"
  16. ^ "Jetson Center for Youth." Louisiana Office of Juvenile Justice. Retrieved on June 30, 2010.
  17. ^ "Girls Secure Care" (Archive). Louisiana Office of Juvenile Justice. May 5, 2009. Retrieved on December 19, 2015.

External links[edit]