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Love, Inc. (TV series)

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Love, Inc
The word "Love, Inc." appear in front of a black screen. The words "Love," and "Inc." are shown in red/pink and silver respectively, with a pink heart attached to the bottom of "Inc."
Title card
Genre Sitcom
Created by Andrew Secunda
Starring
Theme music composer
Composer(s)
  • Kurt Farquhar
  • Steve Hopkins
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 22 (list of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s)
  • Adam Chase
  • Warren Littlefield
  • Mark Burg
  • Oren Koules
Location(s) Paramount Studios (Hollywood, Los Angeles, California)
Camera setup Multi-camera
Running time 20–22 minutes
Production company(s)
Distributor
Release
Original network UPN
Picture format 480i/576i (4:3 SDTV)
Audio format Stereo
Original release September 22, 2005 (2005-09-22) – May 11, 2006 (2006-05-11)
External links
Official website

Love, Inc. is an American television sitcom, created by Andrew Secunda, which originally aired on United Paramount Network (UPN) from September 22, 2005 to May 11, 2006, lasting one season. With an ensemble cast led by Busy Philipps, Vince Vieluf, Reagan Gomez-Preston, Ion Overman, and Holly Robinson Peete, the show revolves around five matchmakers working in a dating agency. The series was produced by Chase TV, the Littlefield Company, Burg/Koules Television, and Paramount Television, and distributed by UPN in its original run and later by LivingTV and Nelonen in the United Kingdom and Sweden respectively. The executive producers were Adam Chase, Warren Littlefied, Mark Burg, and Oren Koules.

Originally developed under the working title Wingwoman, Love, Inc. was intended to be a vehicle for Shannen Doherty. It would have marked her first role in a sitcom. Though picked up by UPN, Doherty was removed from the project at the request of the network due to her poor reception by preview audiences; Doherty was replaced by Philipps. It was set in New York, but the filming took place at Paramount Studios in Hollywood, Los Angeles and California. UPN heavily promoted the show to attract an "urban" audience, and to that end, paired it with Everybody Hates Chris and included contemporary hip hop music.

The series suffered low viewership despite its high ratings among young Hispanic women; it was cancelled following UPN's merger with the WB to launch the CW in 2006. The cancellation of the series, along with that of other black sitcoms, was criticized by media outlets for reducing representation of African American characters and roles for African American actors on television. Critical response to Love, Inc. was mixed: some critics praised its multiethnic cast, while other cited the storylines and characters as unoriginal and Philipps' portrayal of her character as unsympathetic. It was never made available on Blu-ray or DVD.

Premise[edit]

Set in New York City, the dating agency Love, Inc. features a staff of single friends desperately looking for love. Newly divorced Clea Lavoy, the creator and owner of the company, seeks out the help of her friend and employee Denise Johnson to reignite her romantic life. She continually struggles to find love despite Denise's best attempts. The future of the agency is put into jeopardy considering that its success and advertising relied on Clea's "successful", nearly decade-long marriage. Love, Inc. also includes the receptionist Viviana, the style expert Francine, and the technician and photographer Barry.[1][2]

Episodes typically depict the inner workings of the agency, such as their first experience with a lesbian client, a consultation with a former priest, and marketing strategies to appeal to geeks and agoraphobes.[2] Hired as wingmen for their clients, the employees act as "guardian angels for the conversationally challenged".[3] Each of the five characters have various comedic and romantic adventures outside the agency, like Viviana's search for an eligible United States citizen to marry in order to secure a green card[1] and Denise's inability to find true love despite her talent in matching her clients with their "seemingly unattainable soulmates".[4]

Characters[edit]

The series features five main characters throughout its run:

  • Busy Philipps as Denise Johnson, a dating consultant and self-described expert at matchmaking, who provides her clients with "come-on lines to use and avoid; wardrobe and grooming hints, and conversation starters and stoppers".[5] Despite being characterized as "the Kung Fu master at setting up freaks,"[6] she struggles with finding her own true love. After being contacted by her ex-boyfriend to find the perfect match, she becomes cynical about dating and love, saying "I’ve been Wing Womaning my butt off".[1] Philipps described the character's love life as a "complete disaster".[7]
  • Vince Vieluf as Barry, Denise's roommate and co-worker[8] who serves as the agency's technician[6] and photographer.[9] Described as an "idiot savant",[10] he is characterized as a conspiracy theorist who experiences paranoia about everything from dentists to toothpaste companies.[11] He frequently communicates through "head-scratching non sequiturs",[6] leading to the characters perceiving him as "operat[ing] on a whole other level...and sometimes on a whole other planet".[12] Vieluf said the character was pitched as "the only guy on the show" and "the luckiest guy in the world".[13]
  • Reagan Gomez-Preston as Francine, the agency style expert who encourages her clients to use and trust their fashion as a way to find a partner.[12] She is introduced as criticizing Clea's outfit as belonging to a coach for a women's basketball team and is characterized as the hip worker at the agency.[11] Francine's storylines were not fully developed and "remain[ed] a bit of a mystery" by the end of the show.[1] According to Vieluf, Francine communicates through a "whole different language" and has a special bond with Barry due to their different approaches to life.[13]
  • Ion Overman as Viviana, an Argentinian receptionist who "solicits personal information in a rather startling way".[6] She is constantly searching for an eligible American citizen to marry in order to secure a green card.[11] Her heavy accent is written as a source of humor on the show,[14] which led to critics accusing the writers of reducing the character to an ethnic stereotype.[15]
  • Holly Robinson Peete as Clea Lavoy, the founder and owner of the Love, Inc. dating agency. Clea is "thrust into the dating world" following the end of her nearly decade-long marriage,[12] in which her husband has an affair with a younger woman.[5]

Production[edit]

Love, Inc. was developed under the working title Wing Woman and promoted as a "new 'Hitch'-esque comedy".[16] The show's concept was based on an article from The New York Times that discussed dating services.[17] Production was handled by Chase TV, the Littlefield Company, Burg/Koules Television, and Paramount Television.[12] The Littlefield Company suggested that the show's creator Andrew Secunda collaborate with executive producer Adam Chase, who had previously worked on Friends.[16][18] The series was Secunda's first experience creating a television sitcom.[18] Marta Kauffman, Liz Tuccillo,[19] and Mark Burg and Oren Koules also contributed to the series as executive producers.[16] On April 12, 2005, UPN announced that Doherty was in talks for the lead role while Reagan Gomez-Preston was being considered for the role of the lead character's "longtime friend, co-worker and roommate" and Ion Overman for an unspecified part.[20] Overman said she was attracted to part since she was searching for a job and viewed the series as a "very cool concept".[21] On April 18, Holly Robinson Peete was confirmed to have joined the cast as the boss to Doherty's character.[22]

A woman with shoulder-length black hair wearing a black dress with a plunging neckline speaks to a reporter.
Love, Inc. was originally designed as a vehicle for Shannen Doherty (pictured above), but she was replaced at the request of UPN.

The series was originally designed as a star vehicle for Doherty,[11] who portrayed Denise Johnson in the unaired pilot.[23] Denise was Doherty's first role in a television sitcom.[24] Doherty said she immediately loved the script for the pilot, which she described as "hysterical," but felt intimidated by the role given her inexperience with comedy.[25] The series was initially marketed as featuring Doherty and Peete,[26] before United Paramount Network (UPN) announced it would pick it up on the condition Doherty was removed and the character was recast.[27] According to TV Guide, Doherty was poorly received by preview audiences.[28] When queried by an interviewer about the removal of Doherty from the show, executive producer Warren Littlefield said the actress was "fabulous" in the role. According to Littlefield, Doherty actively wanted to change her negative reputation from leaving Beverly Hills, 90210 and Charmed through acting on the show. Peete praised Doherty's performance on the show, saying "we had so much fun and such a great vibe". UPN Entertainment president cited the rationale behind Doherty's departure through the "standard going-in-a-different-direction reason".[29] Rachel Cericola of TV Fodder listed Love, Inc. as one the "four promising sitcoms for the upcoming TV season" due to the behind the scenes drama involving Doherty's replacement.[19]

UPN announced that Busy Philipps was cast as Denise on July 25,[30] and later billed as the show's star.[24] According to Vince Vieluf, the casting change from Doherty to Philipps led to the series being retooled as an ensemble show featuring all the members of the agency rather than focusing on Denise. Vieluf said the alterations in the series' premise were due to concerns that "people would get tired of a show that was only about the mishaps of one person’s love life".[13] Page Kennedy reported that he was considered for a part on the show, but rejected it for the role of Caleb Applewhite on the second season of the ABC drama Desperate Housewives.[31] Retired Los Angeles Lakers player Rick Fox guest starred in three episodes as David, one of Clea's love interests.[32] The casting of racially diverse actors was identified with UPN's position as "the only network to actively program for an African American audience". Tim Good of the San Francisco Chronicle pointed to the show's casting as the only way in which it acts as a "positive reference".[33] Even though the show was set in New York City, filming took place in the Bluhdorn Building at Paramount Studios in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California,[34] and used the multiple-camera format.[12] Transitions between scenes feature images of New York City set to contemporary music, such as The Black Eyed Peas' single "Don't Phunk with My Heart" and Kelis' single "Milkshake". Todd R. Ramlow of PopMatters described the music as a further attempt to appeal to "an 'urban,' black-white audience," and praised the musical choices as a "nice try at crossover for a network whose shows usually target a black demographic".[1] Aaron Korsh wrote the nineteenth episode as freelance work.[17]

Episodes[edit]

The title for each episode references a popular sitcom.[2]

No. Title Directed by Written by Original air date U.S. viewers
(millions)
1 "Pilot" Rob Schiller Andrew Secunda September 22, 2005 (2005-09-22)[35]
After being contacted by ex-boyfriend, Denise Johnson grows excited about the possibility that they will re-kindle their romance. She is disappointed to discover he wants to use her skills as an expert matchmaker to find a new partner. The staff of Love, Inc. band together to their boss Clea Lavoy adjust to single life after her husband Daniel divorces her to pursue a relationship with a much younger woman.
2 "Living Single" Rob Schiller Robert Peacock September 29, 2005 (2005-09-29)[36]
Denise and Francine collaborate in an attempt to help Clea distance herself from Daniel and move forward with her life. Following their discovery that Daniel's new fiancé is having an affair with another man, Denise and Francine disagree on the best way to handle the situation. Barry develops a crush on his client.
3 "Mad About You" Ellen Gittelsohn Maggie Bandur October 6, 2005 (2005-10-06)[37]
Denise believes she met her soulmate on a subway platform, leading her to repeatedly return to the station in order to find him. The staff of Love, Inc. are conflicted on the best way to handle a demanding client who only agrees to date men that fulfill her extensive list of requirements.
4 "Bosom Buddies" Arlene Sanford Maggie Bandur October 13, 2005 (2005-10-13)[38] 3.92[39]
Denise's new boyfriend Grey invites her to his birthday party as their second date. At the party, she becomes increasingly confused and paranoid as he keeps disappearing throughout the night. Clea assigns Viviana to arrange a date for the agency's first lesbian client.
5 "Family Ties" Sheldon Epps Sarah Fitzgerald October 20, 2005 (2005-10-20)[40] 3.1[41]
While working with an older, white man under the delusion that he is hip, Francine discovers he is more interested in dating her than finding a potential match. Denise grows attracted to a veterinarian and lies to him about her dislike for animals to make herself more appealing to him.
6 "Amen" Sheldon Epps Laurie Parres October 27, 2005 (2005-10-27)[42] 3.1[41]
Clea feels conflicted about her date with Father John, a former priest from her church who renounced his vows to search for love. When the date becomes more intimate, Clea becomes hesitant about the future of their relationship. Denise and Barry help a man acclimate to his life after prison by encouraging him to search for his possible soulmate.
7 "Hope & Faith" Arlene Sanford Elana Berkowitz November 3, 2005 (2005-11-03)[43]
Clea reveals to the staff of Love, Inc. that her ex-husband frequently criticized her for not being spontaneous enough. The staff attempts to make Clea less serious. Denise and Barry try to encourage a client to overcome his anxiety and go on a second date with a woman he cares about deeply.
8 "Thick & Thin" Katy Garretson Michael Curtis November 10, 2005 (2005-11-10)[44] 2.5[45]
Denise reunites with her former college friend, who had recently lost a dramatic amount of weight and rejects all of Denise's advice and concern. As Clea feels more attracted to her boyfriend David, she becomes paranoid after finding out he has an attractive, female roommate.
9 "One on One" Steve Zuckerman Clarence Livingston November 17, 2005 (2005-11-17)[46] 3.7[45]
After discovering that David has a highly competitive personality, Clea attempts to find something in which she can beat him. Denise and Barry help a client connect with a woman who works behind a bulletproof window at a subway station.
10 "The Honeymooners" Katy Garretson Sean Conroy November 24, 2005 (2005-11-24)[47]
Clea convinces Denise to spend Thanksgiving with her to avoid feel lonely. Clea becomes increasingly attached to Denise over the course of the day. Francine and Barry encourage a client to propose to his partner.
11 "Three's Company" Arlene Sanford Elana Berkowitz December 15, 2005 (2005-12-15)[48]
Viviana accepts a marriage proposal from a younger man, but feels conflicted when her ex-boyfriend returns to rekindle their relationship. The agency begins to market its services towards geeks, and Barry and Francine experience difficulty arranging dates for a trio of clients.
12 "Arrested Development" John Fortenberry Laurie Parres January 19, 2006 (2006-01-19)[49]
Francine is confronted by her mother about her friendship with her biological father, who had abandoned her a child. Denise and Barry help a 12-year-old child arrange a date with his crush.
13 "Grace Under Fire" Steve Zuckerman Robert Peacock February 2, 2006 (2006-02-02)[50]
Denise, Clea, and Francine discover that Barry was previously enrolled in the military after his former Army commander, Major Curtis, recruits him for a secret mission. Denise loses the phone number of the man she met on the subway platform, but meets another man with the same name, causing her to consider dating him instead.
14 "Hello, Larry" Steve Zuckerman Maggie Bandur February 9, 2006 (2006-02-09)[51]
Denise, Francine, and Barry are angry at their clients' demands for the perfect Valentine's Day dates. Clea plans a party for her employees and clients to appease them. The clients riot after overhearing the staff call the party "The Losers' Ball". Clea feels neglected by David, causing her to agree to go on a date with Larry.
15 "Major Dad" Steve Zuckerman Robert Peacock February 16, 2006 (2006-02-16)[52]
Major Curtis recruits the agency to find a suitable match for his daughter Molly. They discover Molly is secretly dating a much older man, and they attempt to break up their relationship. Clea struggles with whether or not she should tell David about her kiss with Larry.
16 "Curb Your Enthusiasm" Henry Chan Sean Conroy March 2, 2006 (2006-03-02)[53]
Denise recruits Francine to change her new boyfriend Mike into her perfect partner. Clea and Viviana use Barry as a fake date to get revenge on a difficult client, who has an offensive sense of humor.
17 "Anything But Love" Steve Zuckerman Andrew Secunda March 23, 2006 (2006-03-23)[54]
Clea and Viviana find the agoraphobic Jamie meet his perfect match with a woman who accepts his anxiety disorder. After discovering Jamie is lying about his condition, Clean and Viviana threaten to tell Charlene the truth if he keeps being dishonest. Barry attempts to leave his girlfriend after discovering she uses dating books to manipulate their relationship.
18 "Cursed" Steve Zuckerman Emily Cutler April 13, 2006 (2006-04-13)[55]
Confused about her relationship with David, Clea seeks advice from Viviana's psychic, Denise's therapist, and Barry. Francine is turned off when she finds out that her date cries at literally everything.
19 "Fired Up" Kevin Bright Aaron Korsh April 20, 2006 (2006-04-20)[56]
A jealous Francine confronts Denise for spending all of her free time with Mike instead of her. Barry and Vivana attempt to help Eric, a fireman with hero syndrome.
20 "Full House" Steve Zuckerman Richard Goodman April 27, 2006 (2006-04-27)[57]
Denise tutors Viviana, who must pass a college course to extend her student visa and avoid deportation. Viviana disagrees with Denise's strict teaching style, and asks Francine for help instead. After winning entry into the Tri-State tournament in Atlantic City, Barry turns to Clea for support.
21 "Dream On" Sheldon Epps Clarence Livingston May 4, 2006 (2006-05-04)[58]
Barry announces to his co-workers that he will be using his winnings from the poker tournament to help one of them achieve their dreams. Everyone competes for his attention, and Denise questions if she has a dream of her own. Clea attempts to educate a client on how to recognize and respond to signs of interest from members of the opposite sex.
22 "Friends" Steve Zuckerman Andrew Secunda May 11, 2006 (2006-05-11)[59]
Denise feels conflicted when Mikes asks her to move in with him. The staff of Love, Inc. disagree with the best method in which a client should confess his attraction for his friend.

Reception[edit]

Broadcast history[edit]

On August 6, 2005, UPN officially ordered the series for thirteen episodes. The network later ordered a full season of twenty-two episodes of the show on November 7, 2005 amid speculation that it would be cancelled.[60] In 2006, LivingTV broadcast the series in the United Kingdom,[61] and it was broadcast by Nelonen in Sweden in 2008.[62][63] UPN paired the series with Everybody Hates Chris, Eve, and Cuts[26] in order to attract an "urban" audience.[64] The network moved WWE SmackDown to Fridays in favor of scheduling Thursdays as focused on sitcoms. This decision was made to establish a "night of scripted programming" and draw more attention from film studios to purchase advertising space for their upcoming releases.[65] Critics questioned the network's belief that Love, Inc. and Everybody Hates Chris would appeal to the same viewership,[64] and noted the difference in quality between the two, with Love, Inc. frequently cited as the inferior show.[10] While the series initially retained 59% of the audience from Everybody Hates Chris,[66] the marketing strategy proved unsuccessful when it lost a majority of the viewership in later episodes.[67]

Cericola reported that Love, Inc. earned an average of 3.6 million viewers per episode[60] and an article in The Hollywood Reporter stated that the series garnered an average of 1.0/3 Nielsen rating/share in the 18–49 demographic. It ranked 141st among broadcast television networks in the 2005-2006 television season.[68] According to the Nielsen Company, the show achieved high ratings among "Latina adolescents Ages 12-17" and earned 3.4 million viewers in that demographic for 2005. It ranked above two other UPN sitcoms: One on One and Half & Half for Latin women in the 12-17 age demographic,[69] and in "the top half of all UPN series" for total viewership.[66] The series premiere saw a 6% increase in the 18–49 age range, 53% in women between 18 and 34, and 118% in women between 18 and 49 from the show that aired in the same time period during the last television season.[70]

The show, as well as a majority of UPN's programs, were officially cancelled due to the network's merger with the WB Television Network (the WB) to form the CW in 2006.[71] Fern Gillespie of The Crisis was critical of UPN's decision to cancel the series given how the network "in one swoop, wiped out five of its eight African American comedies" for the creation of the CW. Gillespie expressed disappointment at the lack of African American sitcoms on the three major networks by saying: "Without that opportunity for some of the younger artists to hone and develop their skills, it will potentially have a generational impact."[72] Critic Tim Goodman identified Love, Inc. as one of six shows "geared for an African American audience" and featuring "an African American lead actress" that were cancelled during the merger. He equated these cancellations as a sign of networks "eliminat[ing] niche programming".[73] The series was never made available on Blu-ray or DVD.[2][74]

Critical response[edit]

Love, Inc. received mixed critical feedback. Ebony's Zondra Hughes praised the show as one of the shows "the networks promise will keep you spellbound" and identified Peete and Overman as its primary "star appeal".[75] While reviewing its broadcast on LivingTV, a reviewer from Daily Record listed the show as its "pick of the day" and suggested it for viewers who would "fancy a giggle".[61] Diane Werts of Newsday found the characters to be "vibrantly well-defined" and the writing "smart, with a light touch".[76] Peete received a nomination for the NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actress in a Comedy Series in the 37th NAACP Image Awards,[77] but lost to Tichina Arnold who starred in Everybody Hates Chris.[78]

The Futon Critic's Brian Ford Sullivan praised Vieluf as the standout despite his limited role, but felt the execution of the matchmaking premise was inferior to that done in the 2005 film Hitch.[8] Variety's Laura Fries wrote that the series had " a quirky vibe, personable cast and snappy writing," but likened it to the "proverbial old maid" by determining that the storylines and characters required more original material.[6] Jon Bonné and Gael Fashingbauer Cooper of Today commended the series for its multiethnic cast, but wrote that it "struggles to salvage some screechingly bad jokes". Bonné and Cooper called the show one of the network's "most vulnerable properties" following the reports of UPN's closure.[64]

A woman with shoulder-length blonde hair and wearing a patterned dress poses during an event.
Busy Philipps' character and performance were negatively received by several critics.

Metacritic, which uses a weighted average, assigned a score of 28 out of 100 based on 17 reviews, indicating "generally unfavorable reviews".[76] Virginia Heffernan of The New York Times criticized the writing for being "unsparkly and sometimes labored" and relying too much on sitcom conventions. Paul Brownfield of the Los Angeles Times criticized the series for being "unintentionally unfunny", comparing it to the fictional sitcom "Rom and Bored" featured in the HBO comedy-drama The Comeback.[3] The Sun-Sentinel's Tom Jicha wrote that Love, Inc. was a "lethal combination of a stupid show and a suicidal time slot".[5] The Chicago Tribune's Maureen Ryan called the series a "grating comedy" that is "destined to be a footnote in history as the show that premiered after 'Everybody Hates Chris,' and most likely faded shortly thereafter".[15] Miami Herald's Glenn Garvin summarized the show as "humdrum",[76] and Doug Elfman of the Chicago Sun-Times dismissed it as "negligible".[79] Mike Duffy of the Detroit Free Press found the series to be a "trite little laugh-track factory".[79] Common Sense Media's Jill Murphy called the show an "unoriginal look at finding love" filled with "stereotypical clients",[9] and Karla Peterson of The San Diego Union-Tribune criticized it for being "neither funny nor particularly youthful".[80]

Critics negatively responded to the character of Denise and Philipps' performance, and cited both as annoying and unsympathetic. Heffernan described Denise as having a "smug fix-it type" personality similar to Cher Horowitz from the 1995 film Clueless without the charm or charisma.[11] USA Today's Robert Bianco gave the series a half of a point out of four and called it on the "worst and laziest" comedies of 2005. Bianco was critical of Philipps' performance, which was described as "constant motion; her face contorting, body twitching, voice braying" and transforming the show into something "truly unbearable".[10] Orlando Sentinel's Hal Boedeker felt that Phillip's character was an "overbearing know-it-all".[76] Matthew GIlbert of The Boston Globe called the show a "one-joke affair" and wrote the premise behind Denise had the "same irony that failed to make Alicia Silverstone's Miss Match very interesting".[14] The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette's Rob Owen favored Doherty's portrayal of the character, which he described as "brimming with self-confidence," and criticized Philipps' Denise as a "dizzyingly neurotic nutcase".[81] Ramlow called the series "boringly un-hip" and wrote that the women were "needy and desperate" and "one-shtick ponies" in comparison to those from Sex and the City.[1]


References[edit]

Citations[edit]

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  22. ^ "Development Update: April 18". The Futon Critic. April 18, 2005. Retrieved July 16, 2016. 
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Bibliography[edit]

  • Chad, Gervich. "How to Manage Your Agent: A Writer’s Guide to Hollywood Representation". CRC Press: 2013. ISBN 978-0-240-82377-5
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  • Warner, Kristen J. "The Cultural Politics of Colorblind TV". Routledge. ISBN 978-1-138-01830-3

External links[edit]