Love 'em and Weep

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Love 'em and Weep
Love-em-and-weep.jpg
Directed by Fred Guiol
Produced by Hal Roach
Written by Hal Roach
H.M. Walker (titles)
Starring Mae Busch
Stan Laurel
Jimmie Finlayson
Edited by Richard C. Currier
Distributed by Pathé Exchange
Release date
  • June 12, 1927 (1927-06-12)
Running time
20 min.
Country United States
Language Silent film
English (Original intertitles)

Love 'em and Weep is a silent comedy short film starring Mae Busch, Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy prior to their official billing as the duo Laurel and Hardy. The team appeared in a total of 107 films between 1921 and 1951.

Opening Title[edit]

Ancient Proverb—Every married man should have his fling—But be careful not to get flung too far.

Plot[edit]

An old flame (Mae Busch) of businessman Titus Tillsbury (James Finlayson) threatens to expose their past, destroying both his marriage and career. He sends his aide (Stan Laurel) to keep her away from a dinner party he and his wife are hosting that evening.[1]

Production[edit]

In Love 'em and Weep Jimmy Finlayson stars as Titus Tillsbury, a successful businessman who is visited by a blackmailing old flame, played by Mae Busch, who later repeated her role in the remake. The mildly dumb business associate who brings disaster upon his hapless employer is played by Stan Laurel in both films.

Since Laurel and Hardy appear in the film, it is considered an early Laurel and Hardy film despite the fact that Hardy's role is a bit part; they barely share any scenes in the film.

Love 'em and Weep was remade in 1931 Chickens Come Home. The 1927 film was the first in which English character actor Charlie Hall was to appear with Laurel and Hardy. He played Tillsbury's butler, which Finlayson would play himself in the 1931 remake.[1]

Love 'em and Weep was filmed in January 1927 and released June 12 of that year by Pathé Exchange.

Cast[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]