Lowell Memorial Auditorium

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Lowell Memorial Auditorium
Lowell Memorial Auditorium; Lowell, MA; west (front) and south sides; 2011-08-20.JPG
West (front) side and south side of building, along East Merrimack Street. The frieze lists battles of the American Revolution.
Address 50 East Merrimack Street
Lowell
United States
Coordinates 42°38′42″N 71°18′15″W / 42.645068°N 71.304172°W / 42.645068; -71.304172
Owner City of Lowell (Managed by Spectra Venue Management)
Type Performing Arts Center
Capacity 2,800
Construction
Opened 1922
Years active 1922-Present
Architect Blackall, Clapp & Whittemore
Website
www.lowellauditorium.com/

The Lowell Memorial Auditorium is an indoor facility located in downtown Lowell, Massachusetts. It is dedicated to local veterans of war.

The 2,800 seat venue was constructed in 1922 by the architectural firm of Blackall, Clapp & Whittemore.[1][2] The exterior walls feature the names of famous generals and battles, with monuments to newer wars on the auditorium's small lawn.

Common events include concerts, comedy acts, large plays, and boxing. Attached to the auditorium is the smaller theatre of the Merrimack Repertory Theatre.

In February 2014 a Civil War era flag was discovered in the basement of the facility.[3][4] The flag had been carried by Solon Perkins, a lieutenant in the 2nd Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment. He was killed in the Battle of Clinton, Louisiana on June 3, 1863.[3] The flag is now hanging in the Hall of Flags at Lowell Memorial Auditorium.[3] Researchers found out that it was donated to the Lowell Memorial Auditorium in 1929 by Mary Sawyer Knapp.[3][5][6]

Gallery[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ Harley, Ed. "History of the LMA". Belvidere Neighborhood Association. Retrieved 2011-08-30. 
  2. ^ "The Beauty of the LMA". Lowell Memorial Auditorium. Retrieved 2011-08-30. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Civil War Flag Discovered In Lowell Memorial Auditorium Basement". Retrieved 2016-01-08. 
  4. ^ "Civil War Flag Discovered at LMA". RichardHowe.com. Retrieved 2016-01-08. 
  5. ^ "From ragged glory, a piece of Lowell Civil War history unfurled". www.lowellsun.com. Retrieved 2016-01-08. 
  6. ^ "More on the Civil War Flag Mystery". RichardHowe.com. Retrieved 2016-01-08. 

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