Loyalty Day

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Loyalty Day
Observed by United States
Celebrations Special day for the reaffirmation of loyalty to the United States and for the recognition of the heritage of American freedom[1]
Date May 1
Next time 1 May 2018 (2018-05-01)
Frequency annual

Loyalty Day is observed on May 1 in the United States. It is a day set aside for the reaffirmation of loyalty to the United States and for the recognition of the heritage of American freedom.

History[edit]

The holiday was first observed in 1921, during the First Red Scare.[2] It was originally called "Americanization Day,"[3] and it was intended to replace the May 1 ("May Day") celebration of the International Workers' Day,[4] which commemorates the 1886 Haymarket affair in Chicago.[5]

During the Second Red Scare, it was recognized by the U.S. Congress on April 27, 1955,[6] and made an official reoccurring holiday on July 18, 1958 (Public Law 85-529).[1][7] President Dwight D. Eisenhower proclaimed May 1, 1955, the first observance of Loyalty Day.[8] In 1958, Eisenhower urged Congress to move Child Health Day to the First Monday in October, to avoid conflicting with Loyalty Day.[7][9] Loyalty Day has been recognized with an official proclamation every year by every president since its inception as a legal holiday in 1958.[10][11]

Statutory definition[edit]

Loyalty Day is defined as follows in 36 U.S.C. § 115:

(a) Designation.— May 1 is Loyalty Day.
(b) Purpose.— Loyalty Day is a special day for the reaffirmation of loyalty to the United States and for the recognition of the heritage of American freedom.
(c) Proclamation.— The President is requested to issue a proclamation—
(1) calling on United States Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on Loyalty Day; and
(2) inviting the people of the United States to observe Loyalty Day with appropriate ceremonies in schools and other suitable places.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "36 U.S. Code § 115 – Loyalty Day". Legal Information Institute. New York: Cornell University Law School. August 12, 1998. Retrieved April 11, 2009. 
  2. ^ Conn, Matt (March 24, 2004). "Loyalty Day celebration set for return to Medford". Wausau Daily Herald. Wausau, Wisconsin: Gannett. Archived from the original on December 9, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Patriotic Days". VFW Veterans of Foreign Wars. Retrieved May 1, 2015. 
  4. ^ "Not to be a downer, but here's a reality check on 'Loyalty Day'". Los Angeles Times (Editorial). 29 April 2016. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  5. ^ "A short history of May Day". Libcom.org. September 11, 2006. Retrieved May 1, 2014. 
  6. ^ "84th Congress, 1st Session" (PDF). United States Statutes at Large. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. 69: 44. 1955. 
  7. ^ a b Eisenhower, Dwight D. (July 18, 1958). Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, eds. "Statement by the President Upon Signing Resolution Designating May 1 as Loyalty Day". The American Presidency Project. Retrieved May 1, 2015. 
  8. ^ Eisenhower, Dwight D. (April 28, 1955). Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, eds. "Proclamation 3091 – Loyalty Day, 1955". The American Presidency Project. Retrieved May 1, 2015. 
  9. ^ Eisenhower, Dwight D. (April 18, 1959). "Presidential Proclamation 3282 declaring May 1, 1959 Loyalty Day". OPA – Online Public Access. National Archives. Retrieved May 1, 2015. 
  10. ^ "Search Results: Loyalty Day". The American Presidency Project. Retrieved May 1, 2015. 
  11. ^ Office of the Federal Register (1967). The Code of Federal regulations of the United States of America. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 42-43.