Lu Zhi (Han dynasty)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Lu Zhi
盧植
Master of Writing (尚書)
In office
? (?) – 189 (189)
MonarchEmperor Ling of Han
North General of the Household (北中郎將)
In office
184 (184) – 184 (184)
MonarchEmperor Ling of Han
Consultant (議郎)
In office
? (?) – ? (?)
MonarchEmperor Ling of Han
Administrator of Lujiang (廬江太守)
In office
? (?) – ? (?)
MonarchEmperor Ling of Han
Administrator of Jiujiang (九江太守)
In office
175 (175) – ? (?)
MonarchEmperor Ling of Han
Academician (博士)
In office
? (?) – ? (?)
MonarchEmperor Ling of Han
Personal details
Born159
Zhuozhou, Hebei
Died192
Children
Relativessee Lu family of Fanyang
OccupationGeneral, official, scholar
Courtesy nameZigan (子幹)

Lu Zhi (159–192),[1] courtesy name Zigan, was a Chinese general, government official, and scholar during the Eastern Han dynasty. According to the records of the Three kingdoms, he was the mentor of Liu Bei, and was described as a tall man (approximately 1.89 metres) with deep voice.

Life[edit]

Lu Zhi was born in Zhuo Commandery (涿, Zhuōjùn; present-day Zhuozhou, Hebei) in AD 159.[1] He studied under Ma Rong and Zheng Xuan was one of his classmates.[2]

He was among the most preëminent scholars of the area, known for his study of texts on Chinese rituals and his assistance in compiling the History of the Eastern Han (t , s , Dōngguān Hànjì).[1] His students included Gao You, later a scholarly commentator on Chinese classics;[1] Liu Bei, later the king of Shu during the Three Kingdoms;[3] his relative Liu Deran;[3] and Gongsun Zan, later a regional warlord.[3] While in the service of the Han government, Lu Zhi led imperial forces to attack the Yellow Turban rebels in 184 but was removed from command after a eunuch Zuo Feng (左豐) made false accusations against him. Lu Zhi then later served as a Master of Writing and warned against Dong Zhuo's sudden displacement of Emperor Shao.

Family[edit]

Lu Zhi's son, Lu Yu, later served in the state of Cao Wei during the Three Kingdoms period.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Knoblock & al. (2000), p. 671.
  2. ^ Coblin (1983).
  3. ^ a b c Chen Shou, "Biography of the Former Lord", Records of the Three Kingdoms. ‹See Tfd›(in Chinese)

Bibliography[edit]