Luc Tousignant

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Luc Tousignant
Date of birth (1958-07-04) July 4, 1958 (age 58)
Place of birth Trois-Rivières, Quebec
Career information
CFL status National
Position(s) QB
Height 6 ft 3 in (191 cm)
Weight 185 lb (84 kg)
College Fairmont State University
NFL draft 1982 / Round: 8 / Pick: 218
Drafted by Buffalo Bills
Career history
As player
1982 Montreal Concordes
Career highlights and awards
Honours Fairmont State Athletic Hall of Fame (2008)
Career stats

Luc Tousignant (French pronunciation: ​[lyk tusiɲɑ̃]; born July 4, 1958) is a former quarterback in the Canadian Football League and Olympic handball player.

He competed in three matches at the 1976 Summer Olympics with the Canadian handball team, which finished eleventh in the Olympic tournament.

Tousignant attended Fairmont State University from 1978 to 1981, and played in the West Virginia Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. He was a second-team All-America honouree, the WVIAC's offensive player of the year, and a first-team all-league selection in 1981, when he led the Falcons to the conference title, a 9-2 overall record, and a berth in the NAIA Playoffs. His 4,737 passing yards and 30 career touchdown passes were school records which stood for 14 years.[1]

He was drafted in the 1982 NFL Draft by the NFL's Buffalo Bills in the eighth round, 218th overall. He chose not to sign with the Bills, and instead joined the CFL.

Tousignant's only professional season was the 1982 CFL season with the Montreal Concordes (which is part of the Montreal Alouettes franchise history.) He played in all of their 16 games, starting 5 times. He completed only 75 of his 174 passes, for 989 yards, 4 touchdowns, and 11 interceptions. The Concordes finished the year 2-14.

He is notable for not only being a Canadian starting at quarterback for a CFL team, which is rare, but is also the only French Canadian ever to start at quarterback.

In 2008, the Fairmont State University Athletic Association named him to their Athletic Hall of Fame.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Cochran, Duane (2008-10-06). "FSU Athletic Hall of Fame to induct six". Times West Virginian. Retrieved 2009-02-15. 

External links[edit]