Lucas Pouille

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Lucas Pouille
Pouille US16 (35) (29569444720).jpg
Pouille at the 2016 US Open
Country (sports)  France
Residence Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Born (1994-02-23) 23 February 1994 (age 23)
Grande-Synthe, France
Height 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Turned pro 2012
Plays Right-handed (two-handed backhand)
Coach(es) Emmanuel Planque
Prize money $3,112,473
Singles
Career record 66–52 (55.93% in Grand Slam and ATP World Tour main draw matches, and in Davis Cup)
Career titles 2
Highest ranking No. 13 (8 May 2017)
Current ranking No. 13 (8 May 2017)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open 1R (2014, 2015, 2016, 2017)
French Open 2R (2013, 2016)
Wimbledon QF (2016)
US Open QF (2016)
Doubles
Career record 9–19
Career titles 0
Highest ranking No. 79 (11 April 2016)
Current ranking No. 347 (3 April 2017)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open SF (2016)
French Open 2R (2015)
Wimbledon 1R (2015, 2016)
US Open 2R (2016)
Last updated on: 24 April 2017.

Lucas Pouille (French pronunciation: ​[lyka puj], born 23 February 1994) is a French professional tennis player.

Since December 2016, he is managed by Ion Țiriac.[1]

Personal life[edit]

Pouille's mother is a Swedish-speaking Finn.[2]

Career[edit]

2013–2014[edit]

Pouille received a wildcard for the 2013 French Open to make his first appearance in the main draw of a Grand Slam event. In the first round, he defeated the American wildcard entrant Alex Kuznetsov in straight sets but lost in the second round to then-world No. 28 Grigor Dimitrov.[3]

At the 2014 Paris Masters, Pouille entered the main draw as a qualifier. In the main draw, he defeated Ivo Karlović and Fabio Fognini to reach the round of 16, where he lost to Roger Federer.[4]

2015[edit]

Pouille lost to Gaël Monfils in the first round at the Australian Open. At the Monte-Carlo Masters, he defeated Dominic Thiem to reach the second round, where he lost to Rafael Nadal. He was defeated by Gilles Simon in first round of the French Open and by Kevin Anderson in the first round of Wimbledon. At the German Open in Hamburg, Pouille won a place in the main draw via qualifying. In the main draw of that tournament, he defeated Juan Mónaco and Benoît Paire, to reach the semifinals. It was his first ATP World Tour 500 singles semifinal appearance. He lost the semifinal match against Fabio Fognini in two sets.

2016: Singles quarterfinalist at Wimbledon and US Open[edit]

At the Australian Open, the unseeded pair of Pouille and Adrian Mannarino lost in the doubles semi-finals to Jamie Murray and Bruno Soares, after defeating three seeded pairs in earlier rounds. Pouille lost in the 1st rd of the singles event of the Australian Open to 13th-seeded Milos Raonic to register his third consecutive singles 1st rd defeat in that event.

Pouille defeated 32nd seed Guillermo García-López and eighth seed David Ferrer to reach the round of 16 of the 2016 Miami Open, where he fell to Gilles Simon. At the 2016 Monte-Carlo Masters, he defeated Nicolas Mahut and Richard Gasquet to reach the round of 16, where he lost to Jo-Wilfried Tsonga. In April, Pouille reached his first ATP World Tour singles final at the BRD Năstase Țiriac Trophy in Bucharest, where he lost to Fernando Verdasco.

At the Italian Open in Rome, Pouille reached his first Masters 1000 singles semifinal (after wins over Ernests Gulbis and David Ferrer in the second and third round, respectively), where he lost to Andy Murray. In that tournament, he was defeated in the final qualifying round but entered the second round of the main draw as a lucky loser when Jo-Wilfried Tsonga withdrew from the tournament because of a muscle strain. He broke into the top 32 of the ATP singles rankings for the first time in his career as a result of his fine performance at the Italian Open, thus ensuring that he would be seeded in the singles event of the upcoming French Open.[5] Seeded no. 29, he was eliminated in the second round of the French Open by lucky loser Andrej Martin, after a first-round win over countryman Julien Benneteau. He then had a first round loss in the MercedesCup to John Millman despite winning the first set. He had another first round loss in the Gerry Weber Open losing to second seed Kei Nishikori despite winning the first set.

Pouille then competed at the third Grand Slam event of the year at the 2016 Wimbledon Championships as the 32nd seed. He came into this tournament with a 0-4 ATP World Tour/Grand Slam singles career record on grass and had never contested a ATP Challenger Tour or ITF Men's Circuit singles event on grass.[6] He defeated qualifier Marius Copil in four sets in the first round. He defeated Donald Young in straight sets in the second round. This was the first time Pouille had advanced to the singles third round of a Grand Slam tournament. He defeated Juan Martín del Potro in the third round in four sets despite being a set and a break down. In the fourth round, he defeated 19th seed Bernard Tomic in five sets to advance to the quarterfinals. However, he came up against 10th-seeded Tomáš Berdych and lost in straight sets on Court One. As a result of reaching the Wimbledon quarterfinals, Pouille attained a career-high ATP singles ranking of 21 on 11 July 2016. Pouille lost in the 2nd round of the 2016 Rogers Cup to Rajeev Ram and in the 1st round of the Cincinnati Masters to Nick Kyrgios.

At the 2016 US Open, Pouille ousted Rafael Nadal in 5 sets, 6-1, 2-6, 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (8-6) to reach the quarterfinals where he was defeated by his compatriot Gaël Monfils.

Next, at the Moselle Open, Pouille (the 3rd seed of the tournament) reached the final after defeating countrymen Pierre-Hugues Herbert, Julien Benneteau and second-seeded, David Goffin. In the final, Pouille defeated number one seed Dominic Thiem 7-6(7-5), 6-2, winning his first ATP title ever. As a result, Pouille achieved a career-high ATP ranking of 16 on September 26, 2016, surpassing Richard Gasquet to become French No. 3.

Pouille kicked off the Asian leg of the tour at the China Open. Despite being the no. 6 seed of the tournament, Pouille lost in the second round to eventual finalist Grigor Dimitrov. Next, Pouille competed in the Shanghai Masters, in which he was seeded no. 13. He defeated Fernando Verdasco and Nicolás Almagro before falling to eventual champion Andy Murray. Pouille would face off against Murray two weeks later in the third round of the BNP Paribas Masters in Paris, and Murray would win again.

At the end of the season, Pouille received the ATP World Tour Award for Most Improved Player of the Year. He ended the year with a career-high ranking of 15.

2017[edit]

Pouille started the season at the Brisbane International, in which he was seeded no. 6. He drew countryman Gilles Simon in the first round, and narrowly defeated him, 7-6(8-6), 7-6(7-4), after being down 0-5 in the first set. Pouille then played against Kyle Edmund in the second round, but was forced to retire in the second set due to a foot injury. This injury would further affect him at the Australian Open, where he would lose in the first round to Alexander Bublik.[7]

Pouille then participated at the Rotterdam Open. Seeded 8th, he lost in the first round to Philipp Kohlschreiber. The Frenchman turned his season around at the Open 13 by reaching his third career ATP World Tour singles final, where he lost to French no. 1 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga.[8] Pouille continued his good performance by reaching the semifinals at the Dubai Tennis Championships, where he lost to world no. 1 Andy Murray.[9]

ATP World Tour career finals[edit]

Singles: 4 (2 titles, 2 runners-up)[edit]

Legend
Grand Slam (0–0)
ATP World Tour Finals (0–0)
ATP World Tour Masters 1000 (0–0)
ATP World Tour 500 Series (0–0)
ATP World Tour 250 Series (2–2)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Runner-up 1. 24 April 2016 BRD Năstase Țiriac Trophy, Bucharest, Romania Clay Spain Fernando Verdasco 3–6, 2–6
Winner 1. 25 September 2016 Moselle Open, Metz, France Hard (i) Austria Dominic Thiem 7–6(7–5), 6–2
Runner-up 2. 26 February 2017 Open 13, Marseille, France Hard (i) France Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 4–6, 4–6
Winner 2. 30 April 2017 Hungarian Open, Budapest, Hungary Clay United Kingdom Aljaž Bedene 6–3, 6–1

Singles performance timeline[edit]

Key
W  F  SF QF #R RR Q# A P Z# PO G F-S SF-B NMS NH
(W) Won tournament; reached (F) final, (SF) semifinal, (QF) quarterfinal; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; competed at a (RR) round-robin stage; reached a (Q#) qualification round; (A) absent; played in a (Z#) Davis/Fed Cup Zonal Group (with number indication) or (PO) play-off; won a (G) gold, (F-S) silver or (SF-B) bronze Olympic medal; a (NMS) downgraded Masters Series/1000 tournament; or (NH) tournament not held.
To avoid confusion and double counting, these charts are updated either at the conclusion of a tournament, or when the player's participation in the tournament has ended.

Current through the 2017 Internazionali BNL d'Italia

Tournament 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 W–L
Grand Slam tournaments
Australian Open Q2 1R 1R 1R 1R 0–4
French Open 2R 1R 1R 2R 2–4
Wimbledon A Q1 1R QF 4–2
US Open Q2 A 1R QF 4–2
Win–Loss 1–1 0–2 0–4 9–4 0–1 10–12
ATP World Tour Masters 1000
Indian Wells Masters A A A 1R 3R 1–2
Miami Masters A A A 4R 2R 3–2
Monte Carlo Masters A A 2R 3R SF 7–3
Madrid Masters A Q1 A 2R 1R 1–2
Rome Masters A A A SF 1R 2–2
Canada Masters A A A 2R 1–1
Cincinnati Masters A A A 1R 0–1
Shanghai Masters A A Q1 3R 2–1
Paris Masters A 3R 1R 3R 3–3
Win–Loss 0–0 2–1 1–2 12–9 5–5 20–17
Career statistics
2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Career
Titles / Finals 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 1 / 2 1 / 2 2 / 4
Overall Win–Loss 1–4 2–4 12–14 34–22 17–10 66–54
Year-end Ranking 204 133 78 15

Wins over top 10 players[edit]

Season 2016 Total
Wins 5 5
# Player Rank Event Surface Rd Score Pouille
rank
2016
1. Spain David Ferrer 8 Miami, United States Hard 3R 6–7(1–7), 7–6(7–4), 7–5 88
2. France Richard Gasquet 10 Monte Carlo, Monaco Clay 2R 4–6, 7–5, 6–1 82
3. Spain David Ferrer 9 Rome, Italy Clay 3R 6–4, 6–1 52
4. Spain Rafael Nadal 5 US Open, New York, United States Hard 4R 6–1, 2–6, 6–4, 3–6, 7–6(8–6) 25
5. Austria Dominic Thiem 10 Moselle Open, Metz, France Hard (i) F 7–6(7–5), 6–2 18

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Awards
Preceded by
South Korea Hyeon Chung
ATP Most Improved Player
2016
Succeeded by
Incumbent