Lucas Tramèr

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Lucas Tramèr
Lucas Tramer (cropped).jpg
Lucas Tramèr winning gold at the World Championships in 2013
Personal information
NationalitySwiss
Born (1989-09-01) 1 September 1989 (age 29)
Interlaken, Switzerland
ResidencePuplinge, Switzerland
Sport
CountrySwitzerland
SportRowing

Lucas Tramèr (born 1 September 1989) is a Swiss rower. He won gold at the 2016 Summer Olympics in the men's lightweight four,[1] with Simon Schürch, Simon Niepmann and Mario Gyr.[2][3] The team was coached by New Zealander Ian Wright.[2] Tramèr has also won a number of gold medals at the World Rowing Championships. He also competed in the Men's lightweight coxless four event at the 2012 Summer Olympics.[4]

Career[edit]

The team of Tramèr, Simon Schürch, Simon Niepmann and Mario Gyr finished in 3rd in the men's lightweight four at the 2010 European Championships, 6th at the 2011 World Championships, and improved to 5th at the 2012 Olympics.[5][6][7]

After the 2012 Summer Olympics, Tramèr competed in the lightweight pairs with Simon Niepmann winning the 2013 and 2014 World and European titles.[8][9][10][11] The pair's winning time of 6:22.910 at the 2014 World Championships remains the world's best in 2018.[12]

In 2015, Tramèr won the World and European men's lightweight four titles with Schürch, Niepmann and Gyr.[13][14]

In 2016, before the Olympics, he won the European lightweight four title with Schürch, Niepmann and Gyr, the same team that later won Olympic gold in Rio.[15] The gold medal in Rio was Switzerland's third ever Olympic gold in rowing, and the first they had won since 1996.[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Rio Olympics 2016: Switzerland edge Denmark to win lightweight four gold". BBC Sport. 11 August 2016.
  2. ^ a b "New Zealand's Ian Wright guides Switzerland to rowing gold at Rio Olympics". Stuff.co.nz. 12 August 2016. Retrieved 30 September 2016.
  3. ^ "2016 OLYMPIC GAMES REGATTA - Rio de Janeiro, BRA - (LM4-) Lightweight Men's Four - Final". www.worldrowing.com. 11 August 2016. Retrieved 22 August 2018.
  4. ^ "Lucas Tramer Olympic Results". Sports Reference. Retrieved 3 August 2012.
  5. ^ "2010 EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIPS - Montemor-o-Velho, POR - (LM4-) Lightweight Men's Four - Final". www.worldrowing.com. 12 September 2010. Retrieved 22 August 2018.
  6. ^ "2011 WORLD ROWING CHAMPIONSHIPS - Bled, SLO - (LM4-) Lightweight Men's Four - Final". www.worldrowing.com. 2 September 2011. Retrieved 22 August 2018.
  7. ^ "2012 OLYMPIC GAMES - London, GBR - (LM4-) Lightweight Men's Four - Final". www.worldrowing.com. 2 August 2012. Retrieved 22 August 2018.
  8. ^ "2013 WORLD ROWING CHAMPIONSHIPS -Chungju, KOR - (LM2-) Lightweight Men's Pair - Final". www.worldrowing.com. 30 August 2013. Retrieved 22 August 2018.
  9. ^ "2013 EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIPS - Seville, ESP -(LM2-) Lightweight Men's Pair - Final". www.worldrowing.com. 2 June 2013. Retrieved 22 August 2018.
  10. ^ "2014 WORLD ROWING CHAMPIONSHIPS -Amsterdam, NED - (LM2-) Lightweight Men's Pair - Final". www.worldrowing.com. 29 August 2014. Retrieved 22 August 2018.
  11. ^ "2014 EUROPEAN ROWING CHAMPIONSHIPS -Belgrade, SRB - (LM2-) Lightweight Men's Pair - Final". www.worldrowing.com. 1 June 2014. Retrieved 22 August 2018.
  12. ^ "Statistics - worldrowing.com". www.worldrowing.com. Retrieved 2018-08-22.
  13. ^ "2015 WORLD ROWING CHAMPIONSHIPS - Aiguebelette, FRA - (LM4-) Lightweight Men's Four - Final". www.worldrowing.com. 6 September 2015. Retrieved 22 August 2018.
  14. ^ "2015 EUROPEAN ROWING CHAMPIONSHIPS -Poznan, POL - (LM4-) Lightweight Men's Four - Final". www.worldrowing.com. 31 May 2015. Retrieved 22 August 2018.
  15. ^ "2016 EUROPEAN ROWING CHAMPIONSHIPS -Brandenburg, GER - (LM4-) Lightweight Men's Four - Final". www.worldrowing.com. 8 May 2016. Retrieved 22 August 2018.
  16. ^ "The year that was … lightweight men's four - worldrowing.com". www.worldrowing.com. Retrieved 2018-08-22.