Lucien Greaves

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Lucien Greaves
LucienGreavesSASHAcon2016.jpg
Greaves in March 2016
Born
Other namesDouglas Mesner
Alma materHarvard University[1]
OccupationSocial activist
Websiteluciengreaves.com

Douglas Misicko,[2] also known by the pseudonyms Lucien Greaves and Douglas Mesner,[3][4][5] is a social activist and the spokesman and co-founder of The Satanic Temple.

Biography[edit]

Greaves was born in Detroit, Michigan.[5] He studied neuroscience with a speciality in false-memory syndrome[6] and graduated from Harvard University.[5]

Greaves has spoken on the topics of Satanism, secularism, and The Satanic Temple at universities throughout the United States,[7][8][9] and he has been a featured speaker at national conferences hosted by American Atheists,[10] the American Humanist Association,[11] and the Secular Student Alliance.[12]

Greaves has been instrumental in setting up the Protect Children Project, the After School Satan project, and several political demonstrations and legal actions designed to highlight social issues involving religious liberty and the separation of church and state.[13][14]

He says he has received many death threats, and deliberately does not use his legal name to avoid threats to his family.[5]

Greaves was featured in Hail Satan? (2019), a documentary film about the The Satanic Temple and religious belief.

In an interview, Greaves describes how the idea for The Satanic Temple was conceived. Greaves and his colleagues envisioned The Satanic Temple as a “poison pill” in the Church/State debate. Their idea was that Satanists, asserting their rights and privileges where religious agendas have been successful in imposing themselves upon public affairs, could serve as a reminder that such privileges are for everybody, and can be used to serve an agenda beyond the current narrow understanding of what the religious agenda is.

Greaves has publicly stated that he does not worship Satan nor do followers of The Satanic Temple. Greaves claims that the idea of worship is insulting to people who identify with Satanism, because it implies a sense of servility. Instead, Greaves claims that Satanism is more about personal sovereignty and independence and freedom of will.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bugbee, Shane. "Unmasking Lucien Greaves, Leader of the Satanic Temple". Vice (magazine). Retrieved January 15, 2020.
  2. ^ Manganis, Julie (May 30, 2018). "Satanic Temple cries foul over Twitter treatment". The Salem News. Retrieved December 16, 2019.
  3. ^ Miller, Matt (November 21, 2015). "Why the Satanic Temple Is Opening Its Doors to American Muslims". Esquire. Hearst Magazines. Retrieved December 3, 2015.
  4. ^ Bugbee, Shane (July 31, 2013). "Unmasking Lucien Greaves, Leader of the Satanic Temple". Vice. Retrieved December 2, 2015.
  5. ^ a b c d "Lucien Greaves of the Satanic Temple". Detroit Metro Times. May 27, 2014. Retrieved December 2, 2015.
  6. ^ "A Satanic panic over church and state in Hail Satan?". Georgia Straight Vancouver's News & Entertainment Weekly. May 1, 2019. Retrieved May 6, 2019.
  7. ^ "Lucien Greaves, "The Satanic Temple and the Law" - University of Chicago Law School". www.law.uchicago.edu. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  8. ^ "'Satan at CU?' Student group brings Satanic Temple leader to Boulder campus". dailycamera.com. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  9. ^ "Satanic Temple co-founder promotes respect, secularism - The Utah Statesman". usustatesman.com. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  10. ^ "American Atheists Tackles Bible Belt for 2015 Convention - American Atheists". atheists.org. September 16, 2014. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  11. ^ "Lucien Graeves". americanhumanist.org. Archived from the original on November 8, 2017. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  12. ^ "Lucien Greaves - Secular Student Alliance". secularstudents.org. Archived from the original on November 8, 2017. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  13. ^ Oppenheimer, Mark (July 10, 2015). "A Mischievous Thorn in the Side of Conservative Christianity". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 2, 2015.
  14. ^ Marcotte, Amanda (May 6, 2015). "Satanists Support Abortion Rights, Conservatives Freak Out". Rolling Stone. Retrieved November 8, 2017.

External links[edit]