Lucius Benedict Peck

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Lucius Benedict Peck
Lucius B. Peck.jpg
Member of the
United States House of Representatives
from Vermont's 4th district
In office
March 4, 1847 – March 3, 1851
Preceded by Paul Dillingham
Succeeded by Thomas Bartlett, Jr.
Member of the Vermont House of Representatives
In office
1831–1832
Personal details
Born (1802-11-17)November 17, 1802
Waterbury, Vermont, US
Died December 28, 1866(1866-12-28) (aged 64)
Lowell, Massachusetts, US
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Martha Day Peck[1]
Children Mary Peck
Profession Politician, Lawyer

Lucius Benedict Peck (November 17, 1802 – December 28, 1866) was an American lawyer and politician. He served as a U.S. Representative from Vermont.

Biography[edit]

Peck was born in Waterbury, Vermont to General John Peck and Anna Benedict Peck.[2] He pursued classical studies and attended the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York for one year, before resigning due to poor health.[3] He studied law with Vermont Supreme Court Justice Samuel Prentiss,[4] and was admitted to the bar in 1825.[5] Peck began the practice of law in Barre. He served as a member of the Vermont House of Representatives in 1831, and in 1832.[6] Peck moved to Montpelier, where he continued practicing law.[7]

Peck was elected as a Democrat to the Thirtieth and Thirty-first Congresses, serving from March 4, 1847 until March 3, 1851.[8] During the Thirty-first Congress, he served as chairman of the Committee on Manufactures.[9] Peck did not seek renomination in 1850, and was an unsuccessful candidate for Governor of Vermont. Following the election for governor, Peck resumed the practice of law.

In 1852 Peck was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention.[10] Appointed by President Franklin Pierce, Peck served as the United States Attorney for the District of Vermont from 1853 until 1857.[11][12] From 1859 until his death in 1866, Peck served as President of the Vermont and Canada Railroad.[13] In 1864, Peck was counsel for the banks robbed in the St. Albans Raid.[14]

Personal life[edit]

Peck married Martha Day on May 22, 1832,[15] and they had one daughter named Mary.[16]

Death[edit]

Peck died on December 28, 1866 in Lowell, Massachusetts, and is interred in Green Mount Cemetery in Montpelier.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Martha Day Peck". Find A Grave. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Lucius B Peck (1804 - 1866)". Ancestry.com. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Martha Day Peck". History50States.com. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Martha Day Peck". History50States.com. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Peck, Lucius Benedict". OurCampaigns.com. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  6. ^ "PECK, Lucius Benedict, (1802 - 1866)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  7. ^ Brown, John Howard (2006). The Cyclopedia of American Biography V6: Comprising the Men and Women of the United States Who Have Been Identified with the Growth of the Nation. Kessinger Publishing,. p. 191. 
  8. ^ "Rep. Lucius Peck". Govtrack.us. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Lucius Benedict Peck". Find A Grave. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  10. ^ Crockett, Walter Hill (1921). Vermont: the Green mountain state, Volume 3. The Century History Company. p. 307. 
  11. ^ Lanman, Charles (1887). Biographical annals of the civil government of the United States. Joseph M. Morrison. p. 384. 
  12. ^ "Peck, Lucius Benedict (1802-1866)". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  13. ^ Vermont Central Railroad Company (1846). Annual Report of the Directors of the Vermont Central Railroad Company to the Stockholders. E. P. Walton. p. 3. 
  14. ^ "Lucius Benedict Peck". Find A Grave. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  15. ^ "Martha Day Peck". Find A Grave. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  16. ^ "Lucius Benedict Peck". Find A Grave. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 
  17. ^ "Peck, Lucius Benedict (1802-1866)". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved December 7, 2012. 

External links[edit]


 This article incorporates public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov.

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Paul Dillingham
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Vermont's 4th congressional district

1847–1851
Succeeded by
Thomas Bartlett, Jr.