Lucretia (gens)

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Lucius Junius Brutus
supporting the body of Lucretia
Statue at Schönbrunn Palace, Vienna

The gens Lucretia was a prominent family of the Roman Republic. Originally patrician, the gens later included a number of plebeian families. The Lucretii were one of the most ancient gentes, and the wife of Numa Pompilius, the second King of Rome, was named Lucretia. The first of the Lucretii to obtain the consulship was Spurius Lucretius Tricipitinus in 509 BC, the first year of the Republic.[1]

Praenomina[edit]

The patrician Lucretii favored the praenomina Titus, Spurius, Lucius, and Publius. They were one of the only gentes known to have used the name Hostus, and may also have used Opiter, which was favored by the Verginii.

The main praenomina used by the plebeian Lucretii were Lucius, Marcus, Spurius, and Quintus. There are also examples of Gaius, Gnaeus, and Titus.[2][3]

Branches and cognomina[edit]

The only patrician family of the Lucretii bore the cognomen Tricipitinus. The plebeian families are known by the surnames Gallus, Ofella, and Vespillo. Carus was a surname belonging to the poet Lucretius. On coins, the cognomen Trio is found, but it is not mentioned in any ancient writer. A few of the Lucretii are mentioned without any surname.[4]

Members[edit]

This list includes abbreviated praenomina. For an explanation of this practice, see filiation.

Lucretii Tricipitini[edit]

Lucretii Vespillones[edit]

  • Lucretius Vespillo, aedile in 133 BC, he threw the corpse of Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus into the Tiber, thereby obtaining his cognomen, which refers to a corpse-bearer for the poor.[32][33]
  • Quintus Lucretius Vespillo, an orator and jurist, who was proscribed by Sulla and put to death.[34][35]
  • Quintus Lucretius Q. f. Vespillo, served in the fleet of Gnaeus Pompeius in 48 BC, during the Civil War; he was proscribed by the triumvirs in 43 BC, but concealed in his own house by his wife, Thuria, until he was pardoned. He was appointed consul suffectus in 19 BC.[36][37][38][39]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, William Smith, Editor.
  2. ^ Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, William Smith, Editor.
  3. ^ Realencyclopädie der Classischen Altertumswissenschaft.
  4. ^ Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, William Smith, Editor.
  5. ^ Plutarchus, Lives of the Noble Greeks and Romans, "Numa," 21.
  6. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, xxvii. 5
  7. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, xxvii. 5.
  8. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, xxviii. 38, xxix. 13, xxx. 1, 11.
  9. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, xl. 26, xlii. 28, 31, 35, 48, 56, 63, xliii. 4, 6, 7, 8.
  10. ^ Polybius, The Histories, xxvii. 6.
  11. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, xlii. 19, 48, 56.
  12. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, xlii. 9, 10, xliv. 7.
  13. ^ Polybius, The Histories, xxxi. 12, 13.
  14. ^ Marcus Tullius Cicero, In Verrem, i. 7.
  15. ^ Marcus Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Atticum, iv. 16. § 5, vii. 24, 25.
  16. ^ Gaius Julius Caesar, Commentarii de Bello Civili, i. 18.
  17. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, i. 58, 59, ii. 8.
  18. ^ Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Romaike Archaiologia, iv. 76, 82, 84, v. 11, 19.
  19. ^ Publius Cornelius Tacitus, Annales, vi. 11.
  20. ^ Marcus Tullius Cicero, De Republica, ii. 31.
  21. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, i. 55 ff.
  22. ^ Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Romaike Archaiologia, iv. 64 ff.
  23. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, ii. 8, 11, 16.
  24. ^ Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Romaike Archaiologia, v. 20, 22, 23, 40 ff.
  25. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, iii. 8, 10, 12.
  26. ^ Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Romaike Archaiologia, ix. 69-71, xi. 15.
  27. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, iii. 8, 10, 12.
  28. ^ Diodorus Siculus, Bibliotheca Historica, xii. 73.
  29. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, iv. 44, 47.
  30. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, v. 29, 32, vi. 4, 21, 22.
  31. ^ Plutarchus, Lives of the Noble Greeks and Romans, "Camillus," 32.
  32. ^ Sextus Aurelius Victor, De Viris Illustribus, 64.
  33. ^ D.P. Simpson, Cassell's Latin & English Dictionary (1963).
  34. ^ Marcus Tullius Cicero, Brutus, 48.
  35. ^ Appianus, Bellum Civile, iv. 44.
  36. ^ Gaius Julius Caesar, Commentarii de Bello Civili, iii. 7.
  37. ^ Appianus, Bellum Civile, iv. 44.
  38. ^ Valerius Maximus, Factorum ac Dictorum Memorabilium libri IX, vi. 7. § 2.
  39. ^ Lucius Cassius Dio Cocceianus, Roman History, liv. 10.

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainRamsay William (1870). "Lucretia et seq". In Smith, William. Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. 2. p. 828.