Lucy Newlyn

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Lucy Newlyn
Lucy Newlyn
Lucy Newlyn
Born 1956 (age 61–62)
Occupation Literary Critic, Poet, Professor at Oxford University
Education Lawnswood High School
Alma mater Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford University
Subject Poetry, Romanticism, Reception theory, Intertextuality

Lucy Newlyn (born 1956) is a poet and academic, who is Emeritus Fellow in English at St. Edmund Hall, University of Oxford, having retired as professor of English Language and Literature there in 2016.

Newlyn is a specialist in eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century poetry.[1]

Life and career[edit]

Lucy Newlyn was born in 1956 in Kampala, Uganda.[2] She grew up in Leeds, where she attended Bennett Road Primary School and Lawnswood High School, winning an open scholarship to read English at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, in 1974.[3] She took up her Oxford place in 1975 and graduated with a Congratulatory First in 1978. Her D.Phil. thesis, supervised by Dr Roy Park, was later published as an Oxford English Monograph by Oxford University Press.[4] While working on her doctorate, she held a series of temporary lectureships in various Oxford colleges.[3] In 1984 (after a year as a lecturer at Christ Church) took up a Stipendiary Lectureship at St Edmund Hall.[5] Two years later, she was elected as the A.C. Cooper Fellow and Tutor in English there – a permanent post which she held in conjunction with a CUF Lecturership in the Oxford English Faculty.[6] Newlyn gained the title Professor of English Language and Literature in 2005.[5] She is Honorary Professor at the University of Aberystwyth,[3] an Advisory Editor of the journal Romanticism,[7] a Fellow of the English Association,[8] and a Patron of the Wordsworth Trust.[9] Following in Bernard O’Donoghue’s footsteps, she has been literary editor of The Oxford Magazine since 2011.[10] She was co-founder, with Stuart Estell, of the Hall Writers' Forum, an online resource launched in 2013 for the exchange of writing and discussion of literature and the arts.[11] In 2015, she led the campaign to elect Wole Soyinka as Oxford's next Professor of Poetry.[12] Married to the economist Martin Slater, Lucy Newlyn has two step children and one daughter.[13]

Work[edit]

Lucy Newlyn’s longstanding research interests are eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century literature, especially poetry and non-fictional prose in the Romantic period; influences on Romanticism; the reception of Romanticism; creativity and multiple authorship; allusion and intertextuality; reader-response and reception theory.[14] She is an expert on Wordsworth and Coleridge,[14] and has published extensively in the field of English Romantic literature, including four books with Oxford University Press and the Cambridge Companion to Coleridge.[15][16] Her book Reading, Writing, and Romanticism: The Anxiety of Reception won the British Academy’s Rose Mary Crawshay prize in 2001: 'a signal contribution to British Romantic studies and literary theory'.[14][17]

Newlyn’s more recent research has concerned peripatetic traditions in poetry and prose; nature writing and environmentalism; regional identity and the poetics of place; the theory and practice of life-writing.[14] Since 2003, she has been working on the prose of Edward Thomas.[14] Her edition of his book Oxford came out in 2005.[18] This was followed by several articles on Thomas, as well as Branch-Lines: Edward Thomas and Contemporary Poetry, co-edited with Guy Cuthbertson.[19] She is general co-editor of Edward Thomas, Selected Prose Writings, a six-volume edition for Oxford University Press.[20] Together, she and Cuthbertson have edited England and Wales and they are currently co-editing another volume, Pilgrimages.[20] Newlyn has never strayed very far from her first love, English Romanticism, and her most recent book, William and Dorothy Wordsworth: All in Each Other (2013) brings together many of her longstanding and recent research interests.[21]

Poetry[edit]

As well as an academic, Newlyn is a published poet and anthologist. Her first collection, Ginnel (Oxford Poets/Carcanet, 2005) concerns her ‘intense local attachment’ to the streets and alleys of Headingley in Leeds, where she grew up.[22] The collection featured in Woman’s Hour on 1 December 2005,[23] and prompted four paintings by June Berry FRWS, shown in the Royal Watercolour Society’s ‘The Poet and the Painter’ exhibition at Bankside Gallery in November 2008.[24] ‘Baking’ was ‘Highly Commended’ by the judges of the Forward Prize and re-printed in The Forward Book of Poetry (Faber and Faber, 2005).[24] Poems from the collection have also appeared in The Guardian, The Independent, The Yorkshire Post, Oxford Today, The English Review, and The Oxford Magazine.[24][25] A recording of Ginnel, read by Sherry Baines, has been published as a ‘Daisy Book’ CD by the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB).[24]

Newlyn second collection, Earth's Almanac (Enitharmon Press, 2015) emerged over a fifteen-year period following the untimely death of her sister.[26] In this collection she adapts the form of the 'Shepherd's Calendar' to the phases of grief, condensing a long process of reflection and remembering into the passage of a single year.[26]

In addition to her own poetry, Newlyn has published several anthologies of poetry and coordinated a number of collaborative writing projects. Together with Jenny Lewis, she was awarded a grant from Oxford University’s Institute for the Advancement of University Learning in 2002 to undertake research based on workshops at St Edmund Hall.[27] Their findings (together with the students’ writing) were published in Synergies: Creative Writing in Academic Practice (2003; 2004).[28] Newlyn was poet-in-residence for The Guardian in November 2005.[29] She ran university workshops on ‘The Craft of Writing’ with Christopher Ricks during his tenure as Professor of Poetry; since 2001 she has run regular writing workshops for students at St Edmund Hall.[27]

Memoir[edit]

Newlyn's personal experience of Bipolar Disorder is described in her fifteen-year memoir, Diary of a Bipolar Explorer, published by Signal Books in 2018.[30] The book combines poetry with prose, and seeks to de-stigmatise mental illness.[31]

Selected publications[edit]

  • Newlyn, Lucy; Gravil, Richard; Roe, Nicholas, eds. (1985). Coleridge's Imagination: Essays in Memory of Pete Laver. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9780521033992. 
  • Newlyn, Lucy (1986). Coleridge, Wordsworth, and the Language of Allusion (2001 paperback ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780199242597. 
  • Newlyn, Lucy (1993). "Paradise Lost" and the Romantic Reader (2001 paperback ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780199242580. 
  • Newlyn, Lucy (2000). Reading, Writing, and Romanticism: The Anxiety of Reception. Winner of the British Academy's Rose Mary Crawshay prize, 2001 (2003 paperback ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780198187110. 
  • Newlyn, Lucy, ed. (2002). The Cambridge Companion to Coleridge. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9780521659093. 
  • Newlyn, Lucy; Lewis, Jenny, eds. (2002). Synergies: Creative Writing in Academic Practice. 1. Oxford: Holywell Press. ISBN 9780954508401. 
  • Newlyn, Lucy; Lewis, Jenny, eds. (2004). Synergies: Creative Writing in Academic Practice. 2. Oxford: Holywell Press. ISBN 9780954508401. 
  • Newlyn, Lucy (2005). Ginnel. Oxford Poets. Carcanet. ISBN 9781903039748. 
  • Newlyn, Lucy, ed. (2005). Chatter of Choughs: An Anthology Celebrating the Return of Cornwall's Legendary Bird. Penzance: Hypatia Trust. ISBN 9781872229492. 
  • Newlyn, Lucy, ed. (2005). Edward Thomas: Oxford. Signal Books. ISBN 1902669851. 
  • Newlyn, Lucy; Cuthbertson, Guy, eds. (2007). Branch-Lines: Edward Thomas and Contemporary Poetry. Enitharmon. ISBN 9781904634355. 
  • Newlyn, Lucy; Cuthbertson, Guy, eds. (2011). Edward Thomas: Prose Writings: A Selected Edition, England and Wales. 2. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780199558261. 
  • Newlyn, Lucy (2013). William and Dorothy Wordsworth: 'All in Each Other'. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780199696390. 
  • Newlyn, Lucy (2015). Earth’s Almanac. Enitharmon. ISBN 9781910392102. 
  • Newlyn, Lucy (9 July 2015). "Selecting Oxford's professor of poetry should not be trial by media". Times Higher Education. 
  • Newlyn, Lucy, ed. (2016). Dorothy Wordsworth: The Grasmere Journal. The Folio Society. 
  • Newlyn, Lucy; Agyeman-Duah, Ivor, eds. (2016). May Their Shadows Never Shrink: Wole Soyinka and the Oxford Professorship of Poetry. Banbury: Ayebia Clarke. ISBN 9780992843670. 
  • Newlyn, Lucy (2018). Diary of a Bipolar Explorer. Oxford: Signal Books. ISBN 9781909930636. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Newlyn, Lucy". University of Oxford. Retrieved 9 October 2015. 
  2. ^ "Carcanet Press - Lucy Newlyn". www.carcanet.co.uk. Retrieved 6 November 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c "Prof Lucy Newlyn Authorised Biography | Debrett's People of Today". www.debretts.com. Retrieved 6 November 2015. 
  4. ^ "Coleridge, Wordsworth, and the Language of Allusion: Paperback: Luc - Oxford University Press". ukcatalogue.oup.com. Retrieved 7 November 2015. 
  5. ^ a b "Home | St Edmund Hall". www.seh.ox.ac.uk. Retrieved 6 November 2015. 
  6. ^ "Newlyn, Lucy | Faculty of English". www.english.ox.ac.uk. Retrieved 6 November 2015. 
  7. ^ "Editorial Board - Edinburgh University Press". www.euppublishing.com. Retrieved 6 November 2015. 
  8. ^ "Wordsworth's Power to "Think Into the Human Heart": A Q &A with Lucy Newlyn | Priscilla Gilman". priscillagilman.com. Retrieved 6 November 2015. 
  9. ^ "Patrons of the Wordsworth Trust - Wordsworth Trust". www.wordsworth.org.uk. Retrieved 7 November 2015. 
  10. ^ "Home | St Edmund Hall". www.seh.ox.ac.uk. Retrieved 8 November 2015. 
  11. ^ "Hall Writers' Forum | St Edmund Hall". www.seh.ox.ac.uk. Retrieved 7 November 2015. 
  12. ^ "Election of the Oxford Professor of Poetry: Hall's English Fellow leads campaign for Wole Soyinka | St Edmund Hall". www.seh.ox.ac.uk. Retrieved 23 February 2017. 
  13. ^ "Carcanet Press - Lucy Newlyn". www.carcanet.co.uk. Retrieved 24 November 2015. 
  14. ^ a b c d e "Newlyn, Lucy | Faculty of English". www.english.ox.ac.uk. Retrieved 8 November 2015. 
  15. ^ "Search Results - Oxford University Press". global.oup.com. Retrieved 8 November 2015. 
  16. ^ "The Cambridge Companion to Coleridge". universitypublishingonline.org. Retrieved 8 November 2015. 
  17. ^ "Rose Mary Crawshay Prize 2001 - British Academy". www.britac.ac.uk. Retrieved 8 November 2015. 
  18. ^ "Signal Books | Oxford". www.signalbooks.co.uk. Retrieved 8 November 2015. 
  19. ^ "Branch-Lines (2014) | Edward Thomas | Enitharmon Books | Buy Books Online | Quality Books | British artists and writers commissioned books | collaborations | limited editions | letterpress printed books". www.enitharmon.co.uk. Retrieved 8 November 2015. 
  20. ^ a b "Edward Thomas: Prose Writings: A Selected Edition: Guy Cuthbertson - Oxford University Press". ukcatalogue.oup.com. Retrieved 8 November 2015. 
  21. ^ "William and Dorothy Wordsworth: Hardback: Lucy Newlyn - Oxford University Press". ukcatalogue.oup.com. Retrieved 8 November 2015. 
  22. ^ "Carcanet Press - Ginnel". www.carcanet.co.uk. Retrieved 19 November 2015. 
  23. ^ "BBC - Radio 4 - Woman's Hour -Ginnels". www.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 19 November 2015. 
  24. ^ a b c d "Home | St Edmund Hall". www.seh.ox.ac.uk. Retrieved 19 November 2015. 
  25. ^ "Eleven-plus by Lucy Newlyn". the Guardian. Retrieved 19 November 2015. 
  26. ^ a b "Earth's Almanac | Lucy Newlyn | Enitharmon Books | Buy Books Online | Quality Books | British artists and writers commissioned books | collaborations | limited editions | letterpress printed books". www.enitharmon.co.uk. Retrieved 19 November 2015. 
  27. ^ a b "Wednesday Workshops | St Edmund Hall". www.seh.ox.ac.uk. Retrieved 19 November 2015. 
  28. ^ "Imaginative leap". the Guardian. Retrieved 19 November 2015. 
  29. ^ "Lucy Newlyn's workshop". the Guardian. Retrieved 19 November 2015. 
  30. ^ "Signal Books | Diary of a Bipolar Explorer". www.signalbooks.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-04-28. 
  31. ^ "Author Interview – Lucy Newlyn – Diary of a Bipolar Explorer (Mental Illness/Memoir/Poetry & Prose)". toofulltowrite (I've started so I'll finish). 2018-04-14. Retrieved 2018-04-28.