Lugal-ushumgal

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Lugal-ushumgal
𒈗𒃲𒁔
  • Governor of Lagash
Lugal-ushumgal, ensi of Lagash, circa 2200 BCE.jpg
Lugal-ushumgal, ensi of Lagash, carrying an animal offering for a deity.[1] Circa 2220 BCE.
King of Lagash
Reignc. 2230-2210 BCE
SuccessorPuzer-Mama
Dynasty2nd Dynasty of Lagash
Lugal-ushumgal was governor of Lagash, at the extreme south of Mesopotamia.
The name "Lugal-ushumgal" on seal impressions, and with standard Sumero-Akkadian cuneiforms.
A seal of "Sibni (𒉺𒇻𒀭𒉌), policeman (𒋼𒇲𒃲, gallagal),[2] servant of Lugal-ushumgal, ensi of Lagash".[3]
Purchase contract
Purchase of a female slave by Lugal-ushumgal, vassal of Naram-Sin. Louvre Museum AO 2689[4][5]
Contract in the name of "Governor Lugal-ushumgal".[6]

Lugal-ushumgal (𒈗𒃲𒁔, lugal-ušumgal)[7] was a Sumerian ruler (ensi, formerly read "Patesi") of Lagash ("Shirpula"), circa 2230-2210 BCE. Several inscriptions of Lugal-ushumgal are known, particularly seal impressions, which refer to him as governor of Lagash and at the same time a vassal (𒀵, arad, "servant" or "slave")[8] of the Akkadian Empire rulers Naram-Sin and his successor Shar-Kali-Sharri.[9][10][11][12]

It can be considered that Lugalushumgal was a collaborator of the Akkadian Empire, as was Meskigal, ruler of Adab.[13]

He was succeeded by Puzer-Mama who achieved independence from Shar-Kali-Sharri, assuming the title of "King of Lagash" and starting the illustrious Second Dynasty of Lagash.[14][15]

Seal of Lugalushumgal as vassal of Naram-sin[edit]

The seal depicts a presentation scene of governor Lugal-ushumgal to a male deity. Lugal-ushumgal is shown standing to the left, carrying an animal offering for the deity.[16] The inscription carries two blocks of columns:

𒀭𒈾𒊏𒄠𒀭𒂗𒍪 𒁕𒈝 𒀭𒀀𒂵𒉈𒆠 𒈗 𒆠𒅁𒊏𒁴 𒅈𒁀𒅎 𒈗𒃲𒁔 𒁾𒊬 𒑐𒋼𒋛 𒉢𒁓𒆷𒆠 𒀵𒋢
DNa-ra-am DSîn da-num Da-ga-deki lugal ki-ibradim arbaim lugal-ušumgal dub-sar ensi lagashki arad2-su

Naram-Sin, the mighty God of Agade, king of the four corners of the world, Lugalushumgal, the scribe, ensi of Lagash, is thy servant.”

Seal of Lugalushumgal as vassal of Shar-Kali-Sharri[edit]

Prism of Lugal-ushumgal
The prism of Lugal-ushumgal: an elegant list of known crafts, finished by a long signature "Lugal-ushumgal, scribe and governor of Lagash.[19][20][21]
Seal of Ur-Ninmar, son of Lugal-ushumgal

The second seal again shows a presentation scene of governor Lugal-ushumgal to a seated deity. Lugal-ushumgal is shown standing to the left, carrying an animal offering for the deity.[22] The inscription carries two blocks of columns:

𒊬𒂵𒉌 𒈗𒌷 𒁕𒈝 𒈗 𒀀𒂵𒉈𒆠 𒈗𒃲𒁔 𒑐𒋼𒋛 𒉢𒁓𒆷𒆠 𒀵𒋢
Shar-kali-sharri da-num lugal a-ga-deki lugal-ušumgal ensi lagashki arad2-su

Shar-kali-sharri, the mighty king of Agade, Lugalushumgal, ensi of Lagash, is thy servant.”

References[edit]

  1. ^ Eppihimer, Melissa (2019). Exemplars of Kingship: Art, Tradition, and the Legacy of the Akkadians. Oxford University Press. pp. 148–149. ISBN 978-0-19-090301-5.
  2. ^ "Sumerian Dictionary". oracc.iaas.upenn.edu.
  3. ^ Dangin, Fois Thureau (1897). "Musée du Louvre Département des Antiquités Orientales: Tablettes Chaldéennes Inédites". Revue d'Assyriologie et d'archéologie orientale. 4 (3): 78, Planche VIII no 25. ISSN 0373-6032. JSTOR 23283791.
  4. ^ "Site officiel du musée du Louvre". cartelfr.louvre.fr.
  5. ^ Dangin, Fois Thureau (1897). "Musée du Louvre Département des Antiquités Orientales: Tablettes Chaldéennes Inédites". Revue d'Assyriologie et d'archéologie orientale. 4 (3): 78, Planche XI no 34. ISSN 0373-6032. JSTOR 23283791.
  6. ^ Dangin, Fois Thureau (1897). "Musée du Louvre Département des Antiquités Orientales: Tablettes Chaldéennes Inédites". Revue d'Assyriologie et d'archéologie orientale. 4 (3): 78, Planche X no 33. ISSN 0373-6032. JSTOR 23283791.
  7. ^ 𒃲𒁔 "ušumgal" in one word uses interverted cuneiforms compared to the basic reading 𒁔𒃲 "ušum-gal" "epsd2/sux/ušumgal [dragon]". oracc.iaas.upenn.edu.
  8. ^ "Sumerian Dictionary". oracc.iaas.upenn.edu.
  9. ^ a b c Radau, Hugo (2005). Early Babylonian History: Down to the End of the Fourth Dynasty of Ur. Wipf and Stock Publishers. pp. 6–7. ISBN 978-1-59752-381-3.
  10. ^ Woolley, Leonard (1938). The Summerians. p. 83.
  11. ^ The Art Of Ancient Mesopotamia ( Art Ebook). p. 53.
  12. ^ Seal image M4 in: The Art Of Ancient Mesopotamia ( Art Ebook). p. 53.
  13. ^ The Cambridge Ancient History. Cambridge University Press. 1971. p. 436.
  14. ^ "Puzur-Mama, who served as a “governor” of Lagash, in all probability during the reign of Shar-kali-sharri. After the Akkadian empire had collapsed, Puzur-Mama became fully independent, assuming the title of "King of Lagash"" in Álvarez-Mon, Javier; Basello, Gian Pietro; Wicks, Yasmina (2018). The Elamite World. Routledge. p. 254. ISBN 978-1-317-32983-1.
  15. ^ The Cambridge Ancient History. Cambridge University Press. 1971. p. 998.
  16. ^ Eppihimer, Melissa (2019). Exemplars of Kingship: Art, Tradition, and the Legacy of the Akkadians. Oxford University Press. pp. 148–149. ISBN 978-0-19-090301-5.
  17. ^ "CDLI-Archival View RT 165". cdli.ucla.edu.
  18. ^ Radau, Hugo (2005). Early Babylonian History: Down to the End of the Fourth Dynasty of Ur. Wipf and Stock Publishers. pp. 6–7. ISBN 978-1-59752-381-3.
  19. ^ Journal asiatique (in French). Société asiatique. 1979. p. 18.
  20. ^ "Das sechsseitige Tonprisma Lugal-usumgal's aus der Sammlung Lichatschew - Das sechsseitige Tonprisma Lugal-usumgal's aus der Sammlung Lichatschew - Page - Zeitschriften der Deutschen Morgenländischen Gesellschaft - MENAdoc – Digital Collections". menadoc.bibliothek.uni-halle.de.
  21. ^ "CDLI-Archival View". cdli.ucla.edu.
  22. ^ Eppihimer, Melissa (2019). Exemplars of Kingship: Art, Tradition, and the Legacy of the Akkadians. Oxford University Press. pp. 148–149. ISBN 978-0-19-090301-5.
  23. ^ "CDLI-Archival View RTC 162". cdli.ucla.edu.
  24. ^ Radau, Hugo (2005). Early Babylonian History: Down to the End of the Fourth Dynasty of Ur. Wipf and Stock Publishers. pp. 6–7. ISBN 978-1-59752-381-3.

Sources[edit]

  • Frayne, Douglas R. (1993). Sargonic and Gutian Periods (Toronto, Buffalo, London. University of Toronto Press Incorporated)
Regnal titles
Preceded by
---
Governor of Lagash
ca. 23rd century BCE
Succeeded by
Puzer-Mama