This is a good article. Click here for more information.

Lurie Children's Hospital

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago
Lurie-childrens-hospital-of-chicago.svg
Ann ^ Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital - panoramio.jpg
An exterior image of Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago.
Geography
Location225 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Coordinates41°53′47″N 87°37′19″W / 41.89639°N 87.62194°W / 41.89639; -87.62194Coordinates: 41°53′47″N 87°37′19″W / 41.89639°N 87.62194°W / 41.89639; -87.62194
Organization
FundingNon-profit hospital
TypeTeaching
Affiliated universityNorthwestern University
Feinberg School of Medicine
Services
Emergency departmentLevel 1 Pediatric Trauma Center
Beds312
SpecialityChildren / Pediatrics
Helipads
HelipadFAA LID: 75IS
Number Length Surface
ft m
H1 66 x 66 20 x 20 rooftop
History
Former name(s)Children's Memorial Hospital
Construction startedOriginal: 1882
Current: 2012
Opened1882
Links
Websitewww.luriechildrens.org
ListsHospitals in Illinois

Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, formerly Children's Memorial Hospital and commonly known as Lurie Children's, is a nationally ranked pediatric acute care children's hospital located in Chicago, Illinois. The hospital has 360 beds and is affiliated with the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. The hospital provides comprehensive pediatric specialties and subspecialties to infants, children, teens, and young adults aged 0–21[1][2] throughout Illinois and surrounding regions. Lurie Children's also sometimes treats adults that require pediatric care.[3][4] Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago also features a state designated Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center, one of four in the state.[5] The hospital has affiliations with the nearby Northwestern Memorial Hospital and the attached Prentice Women's Hospital. Lurie is located on the university's Streeterville campus with more than 1,665 physicians on its medical staff and 4,000 employees.[6] Additionally, Lurie Children's has a rooftop helipad to transport critically-ill pediatric patients to the hospital.[7]

Lurie Children's hosts 70 pediatric subspecialties and has locations across the Chicago area. Physicians and staff provided care for more than 212,000 children in 2018, from 48 states and 49 countries.[8]

On the 2019–2020 U.S. News & World Report rankings of the Best Children's Hospitals, Lurie Children's is the top children's hospital in Illinois, ranking in all 10 specialties.[9]

History[edit]

Origins[edit]

Founded in 1882 as the Maurice Porter Memorial Hospital, nurse and mother Julia Foster Porter established a 8-bed cottage exclusively for children aged 3–13 at the corner of Chicago's Halsted and Belden streets after the death of her 13-year-old son.[10][11]

Two years later in 1884, Porter acquired another property a few blocks away from the original building and built a three-story replacement hospital with 22 beds. In 1896 Porter planned and supported another expansion that increased the hospital's capacity to 50 beds.[12][13]

In 1903 Porter was given a large gift that allowed for the purchase the triangular block of land on which the new Maurice Porter Children's Hospital was built. It remained in Chicago's Lincoln Park neighborhood for 130 years.[14][15]

The hospital underwent further reorganization in 1904, ultimately changing the hospital's name from the Maurice Porter Children's Hospital to Children's Memorial Hospital (CMH).[16][17] A few years later, in 1907 the hospital was gifted an X-ray machine by local philanthropist, John Borland.[18]

The Martha Wilson Memorial Pavilion in 1945.

By 1908, capacity reached 108 beds after the opening of the "Cribside Pavilion", also allowing admission of infants for the first time in the hospital's history.[19] In 1912, CMH was again expanded allowing the hospital to have a total capacity of 175 beds. Generous philanthropic support from the community, including endowments of between $350 and $500 to support a patient bed for 1 year, allowed the hospital to continue providing free care.[20]

In 1926, CMH constructed the new "Martha Wilson Memorial Pavilion", increasing total hospital capacity to 272 beds. During construction of the new pavilion, they also built a residence for nurses and interns on the site of the former 1886 hospital.[21]

In the 1940s, doctors from CMH pioneered one of the earliest pediatric surgery programs in the country. Surgeons Willis J. Potts and Sidney Smith invented a number of surgical tools used to operate on blood vessels and they devised a new surgery to treat blue baby syndrome.[22]

In 1957 it was decided by CMH administration that a new modern hospital building was needed to replace the Maurice Porter and Agnes Wilson pavilions.[23] Three years later, in 1960 demolition was started and ground was broken to make way for the new patient tower, research building, and administrative offices. Two years later, on October 11, 1962, the new patient tower officially opened, with the research tower opening in 1963.[24] In the 1960s Children's Memorial Hospital's department of anesthesia first established a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) at CMH with the capacity of 10 beds.[25]

In June 1979, former McDonald's CEO, Ray Kroc made a donation to the hospital that funded the addition of a three-story building named the "Ray A. Kroc Diagnostic and Treatment Center" in his honor.[26] The building included new operating rooms, a new 25-bed emergency department and a radiology suite.[27]

The main tower of what was then known as Children's Memorial Hospital in 2016.

In 1982 CMH added on a four floor expansion to the main hospital bed tower.[24] The four floors were topped with a new rooftop helipad and one of the floors served as the neonatal intensive care unit for the hospital.[28] Also in 1982, CMH successfully separated a pair of conjoined twins during a nine-hour operation. The twins were previously joined at their pelvises.[29][30]

The former site being demolished

In 2006, hospital administration had announced plans to build an entirely new children's hospital closer to downtown Chicago and closer to the campus of their academic affiliate, Northwestern University.[31] In 2008, the hospital administration and CEO were victims of extortion by then-governor Rod Blagojevich for $8 million of state funding in exchange for a $25,000 fundraiser.[32][33][34]

After the move, the old buildings on the former site sat empty for years becoming an "eyesore" that angered the local community.[35] In 2016, demolition on the former Children's Memorial Hospital began to make way for low-rise apartment and retail space.[36][37][38]

New Hospital Campus[edit]

On June 9, 2012, the hospital moved from their old campus to its current location in Streeterville, in a coordinated move of 200 children that took over 10 hours.[39] The hospital also changed its name to Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago.[40] The new name recognized philanthropist Ann Lurie, and her late husband, in honor of the $100 million gift she made in 2007 to help create the new hospital and to enhance its pediatric research initiatives.[41][42] More than just a donation, Ann Lurie secured funding from other philanthropists and gave tours of the hospital.[43] She also served on the board of the hospital. The donation was the largest that the hospital had ever received.[44]

The staff moved 170 patients and their parents, traveling by ambulance and escorted by the Chicago Police Department.[45] The move was designed to allow the hospital to be closer to its academic partner Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, attract and retain the best staff, foster stronger, collaboration with adult researchers and clinicians, improve transition of patients into adult care, and provide even faster transport for critically ill newborns from neighboring Prentice Women's Hospital.[46][47]

Clearing of the land to make way for the Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital replacing the old Children's Memorial Hospital.
The rooftop helipad of Lurie Children's Hospital.

The new 1.25-million-square-foot (116-thousand-square-metre)[48] building cost $605 million (excluding land) and was completed in June 2012. The building featured 23 floors and was envisioned by ZGF Architects, Solomon Cordwell Buenz, and Anderson Mikos Architects.[49] Structural engineering services for the new building was provided by Magnusson Klemencic Associates.[50] Construction of the building was managed by a joint venture of Mortenson Construction and Power Construction.[51][52]

The new hospital was set to have a rooftop helipad for the critical transport of pediatric patients, which angered local residents and pilots citing safety and noise concerns of a rooftop helipad. A local resident organization eventually filed a lawsuit to try and stop the helipad, ultimately losing the case.[53]

The unique design of the hospital included many firsts in hospital design that included the emergency room being on the second floor.[54] The hospital included almost double the space of the previous hospital and include much needed amenities including outdoor spaces for patients and families, playrooms, and private patient rooms.[55] Design of the hospital has been industry praised and featured in many prominent publications.[56][57][58] The new hospital also includes multiple terraces with plants and trees to help calm patients and families with a new helipad on top for transport of critically ill pediatric patients.[59]

In October 2014, the hospital inaugurated its first annual Hope and Courage awards, recognizing "leaders who have demonstrated exceptional commitments to improving the health and well-being of children".[60] The 2014 honorees were Jamarielle Ransom-Marks, who runs the Jam's Blood and Bone Marrow Drive, child product safety advocates Linda E. Ginzel and Boaz Keysar, and Senator Richard J. Durbin.[61]

In 2016 Lurie Children's announced their plans for a $51 million expansion that would add 44 pediatric intensive care beds and four neonatal intensive care beds to existing space within the hospital.[62] The hospital cited the need for more intensive care beds due to the fact that they were often at capacity, and previously had to turn away patients.[63]

Pancoe (right) raises the Lurie Children's flag on the summit of Mt Everest in May 2019.

In 2019, Chicago native Alex Pancoe started a fundraiser where he committed to climb Mount Everest to raise funds for the hospital with a goal to raise $1 million.[64] Pancoe was previously treated at Lurie Children's Hospital for a brain tumor when he was in college.[65]

In March 2020, Lurie Children's Hospital announced that they would transfer children from other area-hospitals to Lurie to make way for adult COVID-19 surge capacity at the adult hospitals and allow for the adult hospitals to convert their pediatric beds.[66][67] The next month, in April 2020, Lurie Children's Hospital loaned out many of their ventilators to adult hospitals in the area (including neighboring Northwestern Memorial Hospital) to help deal with the adult ventilator shortage because of the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic.[68][69]

In May 2020, it was announced that two employees had viewed over 8,000 HIPAA-protected patient records without permission throughout the previous year.[70] The two employees were fired, but a class-action lawsuit was filed against the hospital for the breach of privacy.[71][72] In December 2020, doctors from Lurie Children's pioneered the use of gene replacement therapy to treat a case of a baby with type 1 Spinal Muscular Atrophy, a disease that deteriorates the muscles.[73] In early 2021, management from both Lurie Children's and Rush University Medical Center (RUMC) announced that they would be forming a pediatric alliance to better deliver pediatric care throughout the region.[74] The alliance would officially start on February 1, 2021, and would align both inpatient and outpatient pediatric services at RUMC under the "Lurie Children's umbrella", known as "Lurie Children's & Rush Advancing Children's Health".[75][76]

About[edit]

Education[edit]

As the primary pediatric teaching hospital of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine,[77] the hospital has a pediatrics residency and fellowship program, maintaining close affiliations with Northwestern. The Feinberg School is ranked 17th for research and 17th for primary care in the 2016–17 U.S. News & World Report rankings of top research-oriented medical schools in the country.[78]

Research[edit]

A formal pediatric research program at the hospital dates back to 1982 when the Children's Memorial Research Center was established. Additional floors for research were dedicated in 2004.[79]

When the hospital moved to their new campus in 2012 and changed names, the research institute was renamed to the Lurie Children's Research Institute.[80] In 2014, the Lurie Children's Research Institute received a donation from philanthropist, Stanley Manne. The donation prompted hospital officials to rename the research arm to the Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute to honor Manne.[81] In 2019, the institute was relocated from its original location in Lincoln Park to the current location in the Northwestern University owned, Simpson Querrey Biomedical Research Center.[82]

Patient care units[edit]

The Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago has a variety of patient care units to care for pediatric patients aged 0–21 throughout Chicago.[83]

  • 48-bed general medical & medical observation units
  • 40-bed pediatric intensive care unit (PICU)
  • 48-bed pediatric hematology and oncology unit
  • 44-bed cardiac care unit
  • 64-bed neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)
  • 45-bed emergency department
  • 23-bed pre and post operative
  • 12-bed psychiatric unit (ages 3–17)

In addition to the pediatric patient care units, Lurie Children's Hospital has 21 operating rooms and a sky garden to help relax families at the hospital.[84]

Ronald McDonald House[edit]

Opened in 2012, about five blocks away from Lurie Children's Hospital is the Ronald McDonald House Near Lurie Children's Hospital (RMCH), one of many in the Chicago region.[85] The house has 70 all-private guest rooms to serve families of pediatric patients aged 21 years or younger in treatment at Lurie Children's, neonates at Prentice Women's, and pediatric rehabilitation patients from Shirley Ryan AbilityLab.[86] The house provides places to sleep, meals, and entertainment to siblings and families for free. Additionally, Lurie Children's hosts a Ronald McDonald family room on site that offers nine sleep rooms, showers, and other amenities to families with children being treated at the hospital.[87]

History[edit]

Before Lurie Children's Hospital moved to their current location, Children's Memorial Hospital featured a 21-room RMCH near their campus. When Lurie Children's moved to the Streeterville neighborhood, a new $40 million, 14-story RMCH was built five blocks away, and nine rooms were built into the Lurie Children's building.[88] The former house near the defunct hospital was later demolished.[89] In August 2018, pharmaceutical company, AbbVie donated $100 million to the nationwide Ronald McDonald House charities, and set aside $3 million for the Chicago Ronald McDonald houses, with AbbVie officials later touring the house.[90] In November 2019 the house unveiled a four-room expansion to increase their capacity and serve more families.[91] In August 2020 the house underwent minor damage after a group of looters taking advantage of a local police shooting protest shattered the glass front door of the house.[92] Additionally, families inside the house were placed on lockdown to ensure their safety.[93]

Awards and rankings[edit]

  • As the first free-standing children's hospital in the country and the first hospital in Illinois, the hospital was granted in 2001 the first of its four Magnet designations which it received again in 2005, 2010 and 2015.[94] Less than one percent of all hospitals have achieved this accomplishment of redesignation three or more times.[95]
  • Upon the opening of the new Lurie Children's Hospital in 2012, the building was designated as LEED Gold certified for environmentally-friendly features like their green roof and stormwater management system.[96]
  • In 2012 the hospital received a design award from the magazine Modern Healthcare for the advanced design and construction practices used to build the new Lurie Children's Hospital.[97]
  • The hospital is one of only 10 children's hospitals nationwide, and the only one in Illinois, to be named a "Top Hospital" for patient safety by The Leapfrog Group, a national consortium of healthcare payers that promotes "leaps" in patient safety.[98]
  • The Joint Commission, the leading accreditor of healthcare organizations in America, named the hospital as one of three of the nation's top performers on key quality measures. Children's hospitals were ranked in one area – children's asthma.[99]
  • In 2014 the hospital was recognized on the Becker's Hospital Review list of "150 Great Places to Work in Healthcare".[100]
  • In July 2016, the hospital became the first children's hospital in Illinois to be designated as a level 1 pediatric surgery center by the American College of Surgeons.[101] The hospital is 1 of 24 nationwide that have received this designation.
  • In both 2019 and 2020, Lurie Children's Hospital was named as a best midsize employer (2019), and a best employer in Illinois (2020) by Forbes Magazine.[102] Also in 2020, Lurie Children's was designated as a "level 8 acute" hospital by the CHIME "most wired" hospital survey for their advanced use of technology.[103]

U.S. News rankings[edit]

On the 2007–08 rankings, Children's Memorial Hospital was ranked #25 best children's hospital in the U.S. on the U.S. News & World Report rankings of pediatric hospitals in the United States.[104]

On the 2010–11 rankings, Children's Memorial Hospital was ranked #10 in pediatric cancer, #10 in pediatric gastroenterology, #18 in pediatric cardiology, #10 in pediatric nephrology, #15 in neonatology, #10 in pediatric neurosurgery, #18 in pediatric orthopedics, #19 in pediatric pulmonology, and #5 in pediatric urology on the U.S. News & World Report rankings of pediatric hospitals in the United States.[105][106]

Ranked #6 among only 11 children's hospitals nationwide to qualify for the Honor Roll in the 2016–17 U.S. News & World Report Best Children's Hospitals rankings.[107]

The hospital was ranked as the #10 best children's hospital in the country on the 2018–19 U.S. News & World Report list of honor roll children's hospitals.[108][109]

As of 2021 Lurie Children's has placed nationally in all 10 ranked pediatric specialties on U.S. News & World Report.[110]

2021 U.S. News & World Report Rankings for Lurie Children's[111]
Specialty Rank (In the U.S.) Score (Out of 100)
Neonatology #8 91.3
Pediatric Cancer #14 83.4
Pediatric Cardiology & Heart Surgery #8 86.8
Pediatric Diabetes & Endocrinology #32 69.2
Pediatric Gastroenterology & GI Surgery #14 85.7
Pediatric Nephrology #12 82.9
Pediatric Neurology & Neurosurgery #11 86.5
Pediatric Orthopedics #35 69.9
Pediatric Pulmonology & Lung Surgery #21 78.4
Pediatric Urology #7 84.5

Notable people[edit]

  • Robert Satcher - Former physician, and NASA Astronaut
  • Susan L. Cohn – Physician and pediatric oncology chief at Comer Children's Hospital, completed pediatric fellowship at Children's Memorial Hospital.[112]
  • John F Sarwark – Physician and head of pediatric orthopedics at Lurie Children's.[113]
  • Willis J. Potts – Pioneered one of the country's first pediatric surgery programs at Children's Memorial Hospital.
  • Orvar Swenson – Former surgeon-in-chief at Children's Memorial Hospital.
  • Frank Spooner Churchill – President of the medical staff at Children's Memorial Hospital from 1909 to 1917.[114]
  • Stephen Dolgin – American pediatric surgeon who completed fellowship at Children's Memorial Hospital.
  • Wolf W. Zuelzer – Pediatric pathologist who completed residency at Children's Memorial Hospital.
  • Rebekah D. Fenton – American physician who works in the department of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine at Lurie Children's Hospital.
  • Marc Weissbluth – American pediatrician and author trained at Children's Memorial Hospital.
  • George J. Mohr – Completed pediatric internship at Children's Memorial Hospital.
  • Nadia Dowshen – American pediatrician who completed fellowship at Lurie Children's Hospital.
  • Ellen Sidransky – American pediatrician who completed residency at Lurie Children's Hospital.

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Adolescent & Young Adult Medicine". Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago. Archived from the original on April 11, 2020. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  2. ^ "Lurie Children's Pediatrics – Uptown". Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago. Archived from the original on April 11, 2020. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  3. ^ "Adolescent & Young Adult Cancer Program". www.luriechildrens.org. Archived from the original on April 11, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  4. ^ "Adult Congenital Heart Disease Program". www.luriechildrens.org. Archived from the original on September 26, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  5. ^ "Illinois Hospital Report Card and Consumer Guide to Health Care". www.healthcarereportcard.illinois.gov. Archived from the original on April 11, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  6. ^ "100 Great Hospitals in America | 2014". Beckers Hospital Review. Archived from the original on March 21, 2015. Retrieved May 27, 2019.
  7. ^ "AirNav: 75IS – Lurie Childrens Hospital Heliport". www.airnav.com. Archived from the original on April 12, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  8. ^ Internal data
  9. ^ "Best Children's Hospitals 2018–19: Honor Roll and Overview". U.S. News & World Report. Archived from the original on February 21, 2019. Retrieved May 27, 2019.
  10. ^ Tribune, Chicago. "Children's Memorial Hospital history". chicagotribune.com. Archived from the original on April 11, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  11. ^ "A century of healing children". Chicago Tribune. April 30, 1982. p. 26. Archived from the original on January 31, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  12. ^ Shulman, Stanford T. (June 1, 2012). "End of an Era: Farewell Chicago Children's Memorial Hospital". Pediatric Annals. 41 (6): 215–216. doi:10.3928/00904481-20120525-01. ISSN 0090-4481. PMID 22694229. Archived from the original on August 3, 2020. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  13. ^ MD, Stanford T. Shulman (2014). Children's Memorial Hospital of Chicago. Arcadia Publishing. p. 14. ISBN 978-1-4671-1108-9. Archived from the original on January 31, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  14. ^ "Children's Memorial Hospital: 131 Years of History". chicagonow.com. June 11, 2012. Archived from the original on December 23, 2019. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  15. ^ "Doctor Publishes Book Detailing History Of Children's Memorial Hospital". CBS Chicago. January 9, 2014. Archived from the original on December 23, 2019. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  16. ^ "Who We Are". foundersboard.luriechildrens.org. Archived from the original on October 28, 2020. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  17. ^ Bigler, J. A. (1950). "The Children's Memorial Hospital". Quarterly Bulletin of the Northwestern University Medical School. 24 (1): 26–33. PMC 3802938.
  18. ^ MD, Stanford T. Shulman (2014). Children's Memorial Hospital of Chicago. Arcadia Publishing. p. 19. ISBN 978-1-4671-1108-9. Archived from the original on January 31, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  19. ^ MD, Stanford T. Shulman (2014). Children's Memorial Hospital of Chicago. Arcadia Publishing. pp. 18, 19, 20. ISBN 978-1-4671-1108-9. Archived from the original on January 31, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  20. ^ MD, Stanford T. Shulman (2014). Children's Memorial Hospital of Chicago. Arcadia Publishing. pp. 27–28. ISBN 978-1-4671-1108-9. Archived from the original on January 31, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  21. ^ MD, Stanford T. Shulman (2014). Children's Memorial Hospital of Chicago. Arcadia Publishing. p. 36. ISBN 978-1-4671-1108-9. Archived from the original on January 31, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  22. ^ "Dr. Willis Potts, physician, was 75". The New York Times. May 8, 1968. Archived from the original on December 17, 2019. Retrieved December 7, 2017.
  23. ^ MD, Stanford T. Shulman (2014). Children's Memorial Hospital of Chicago. Arcadia Publishing. p. 95. ISBN 978-1-4671-1108-9. Archived from the original on January 31, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  24. ^ a b MD, Stanford T. Shulman (2014). Children's Memorial Hospital of Chicago. Arcadia Publishing. pp. 95, 96, 97, 98, 99. ISBN 978-1-4671-1108-9. Archived from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  25. ^ MD, Stanford T. Shulman (2014). Children's Memorial Hospital of Chicago. Arcadia Publishing. p. 109. ISBN 978-1-4671-1108-9. Archived from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  26. ^ Napoli, Lisa (January 18, 2017). "Exploring Ray Kroc's Chicago". Curbed Chicago. Archived from the original on December 20, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  27. ^ MD, Stanford T. Shulman (2014). Children's Memorial Hospital of Chicago. Arcadia Publishing. p. 108. ISBN 978-1-4671-1108-9. Archived from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  28. ^ MD, Stanford T. Shulman (2014). Children's Memorial Hospital of Chicago. Arcadia Publishing. p. 107. ISBN 978-1-4671-1108-9. Archived from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  29. ^ "One Siamese twin leaves hospital". Herald and Review. July 29, 1982. p. 21. Archived from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  30. ^ "One of the Siamese twins goes home after surgery success". The Times. July 29, 1982. p. 8. Archived from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  31. ^ "Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago | ZGF". www.zgf.com. Archived from the original on June 7, 2019. Retrieved January 31, 2021.
  32. ^ Rumore, Jonathon Berlin, Kori. "Blagojevich's crimes: 20 charges, 3 schemes and a lie". chicagotribune.com. Archived from the original on February 21, 2020. Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  33. ^ SIMON, SCOTT (December 13, 2008). "Blagojevich: Playing Politics Against Sick Children?". NPR.org. Archived from the original on February 22, 2020. Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  34. ^ Japsen, Bruce (February 18, 2020). "Children's Hospital Shaken Down By Blagojevich: No Comment On Trump Sentence Commutation". Forbes. Archived from the original on April 11, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  35. ^ "One Year Later, Little Movement To Redevelop Old Children's Hospital Site". CBS Chicago. May 16, 2013. Archived from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  36. ^ staff, Chicago Tribune. "Demolition begins on Children's Memorial Hospital". chicagotribune.com. Archived from the original on September 30, 2018. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  37. ^ Bradley, Tahman (June 7, 2016). "Remembering Children's Memorial Hospital as demolition begins". WGN-TV. Archived from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  38. ^ Popa, Rachel (June 8, 2016). "Demolition begins on Children's Memorial Hospital site – Chicago Agent Magazine Local News". Chicago Agent Magazine. Archived from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  39. ^ "Fullerton Avenue To Close All Day Saturday As Children's Memorial Moves". CBS Chicago. June 8, 2012. Archived from the original on April 11, 2020. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  40. ^ "Fullerton Avenue To Close All Day Saturday As Children's Memorial Moves". June 8, 2012. Archived from the original on April 11, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  41. ^ "Ann Lurie". June 28, 2019. Archived from the original on June 28, 2019. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  42. ^ Gamble, Molly (June 4, 2012). "Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago Adopts New Name Today". Beckers Hospital Review. Archived from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  43. ^ Shropshire, Corilyn (April 9, 2012). "Philanthropist gives away more than $331 million with hands-on approach". chicagotribune.com. Archived from the original on April 11, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  44. ^ Colias, Mike (September 5, 2007). "Children's Memorial to get $100-million gift". Crain's Chicago Business. Archived from the original on April 11, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  45. ^ HAPPOLD, MADELINE (November 11, 2016). "Children's Story – Fourteen East". 14 East. Archived from the original on April 11, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  46. ^ Komiski, Bruce (November 23, 2013). Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago. Images Publishing. ISBN 978-1-86470-521-8. Archived from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved November 6, 2020.
  47. ^ Breu, Giovanna (June 4, 2010). "Hospital's Design Is Guided by Experiences of Youth". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 25, 2019. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  48. ^ "Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago | ZGF". www.zgf.com. Archived from the original on June 7, 2019. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  49. ^ "Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago". SCB. Archived from the original on September 26, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  50. ^ "Magnusson Klemencic Associates | Projects | Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago". www.mka.com. Archived from the original on April 11, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  51. ^ "Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago by ZGF Architects, Solomon Cordwell Buenz, and Anderson Mikos Architects". www.architecturalrecord.com. Archived from the original on August 13, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  52. ^ "Ann and Robert H Lurie Childrens Hospital of Chicago | Chicago | Mortenson". www.mortenson.com. Archived from the original on April 11, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  53. ^ "Lawsuit Seeks To Block Construction Of New Children's Memorial Heliport". CBS Chicago. December 22, 2011. Archived from the original on November 24, 2020. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  54. ^ "Innovative design solutions: Second floor emergency department?". Healthcare Design Magazine. July 31, 2010. Archived from the original on April 11, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  55. ^ Wagenaar, Cor; Mens, Noor; Manja, Guru; Niemeijer, Colette; Guthknecht, Tom (March 5, 2018). Hospitals: A Design Manual. Birkhäuser. ISBN 978-3-0356-1125-0. Archived from the original on September 26, 2020. Retrieved April 26, 2020.
  56. ^ Komiske, Bruce King (2005). Designing the World's Best Children's Hospitals 2: The Future of Healing Environments. Images Publishing. ISBN 978-1-920744-32-8. Archived from the original on September 26, 2020. Retrieved April 26, 2020.
  57. ^ "Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago | The Center for Health Design". www.healthdesign.org. October 5, 2010. Archived from the original on April 11, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  58. ^ Silvis, Jennifer (October 31, 2012). "Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital". Healthcare Design Magazine. Archived from the original on April 11, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  59. ^ "AirNav: 75IS – Lurie Childrens Hospital Heliport". airnav.com. Archived from the original on April 12, 2020. Retrieved April 12, 2020.
  60. ^ "Lurie Children's Honors Patient, Community Advocate and Government Leader for Exceptional Child Health Commitment". Lurie Children's Hospital. October 10, 2014. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved January 31, 2021.
  61. ^ "2014 Hope and Courage Award Honorees". www.luriechildrens.org. October 1, 2014. Archived from the original on April 11, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  62. ^ WLS (December 30, 2016). "Lurie Children's Hospital proposes $51M expansion". ABC7 Chicago. Archived from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  63. ^ Frillman, Carrie (January 2, 2017). "Lurie Children's Hospital Reps Propose $51M Expansion". Chicago, IL Patch. Archived from the original on January 4, 2017. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  64. ^ Keilman, John (March 20, 2019). "Chicago adventurer who almost died training for rarely achieved exploring feat is tackling Mount Everest next". chicagotribune.com. Archived from the original on July 2, 2019. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  65. ^ "Chicago Man Prepares to Climb Mount Everest With Special Flag". NBC Chicago. Archived from the original on September 23, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  66. ^ Schorsch, Kristen (March 30, 2020). "Hospitals Transfer Child Patients To Make Room For The COVID-19 Surge". WBEZ Chicago. Archived from the original on October 26, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  67. ^ GOLDBERG, STEPHANIE (March 25, 2020). "Lurie Children's preps for more patients". Crain's Chicago Business. Archived from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  68. ^ Hart, Rob (April 6, 2020). "Lurie Children's Hospital Loans Ventilators To Hospitals". www.radio.com. Archived from the original on September 19, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  69. ^ "Lurie Children's Hospital Loaning Out Ventilators For Adults With COVID-19". CBS Chicago. April 5, 2020. Archived from the original on April 20, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  70. ^ COHEN, JESSICA KIM (May 11, 2020). "Lurie Children's sued over two recent data breaches". Crain's Chicago Business. Archived from the original on September 8, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  71. ^ Drees, Jackie (May 11, 2020). "Lurie Children's sued for medical records privacy breach". Beckers Hospital Review. Archived from the original on November 27, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  72. ^ Dudek, Mitch (May 8, 2020). "Lurie Children's sued over patient information breach". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on June 1, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  73. ^ Bomke, Natalie (December 16, 2020). "8-month-old baby one of the first to receive a revolutionary new treatment at Lurie Children's Hospital". FOX 32 Chicago. Archived from the original on December 17, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  74. ^ Goldberg, Stephanie (January 22, 2020). "Lurie, Rush unveil pediatric care pact". Crain's Chicago Business. Archived from the original on January 25, 2021. Retrieved January 27, 2021.
  75. ^ Channick, Robert (January 22, 2021). "Lurie Children's and Rush form partnership to expand pediatric care in Chicago". news.yahoo.com. Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on January 31, 2021. Retrieved January 27, 2021.
  76. ^ Klinger, Tobin (January 22, 2021). "Lurie Children's and Rush Announce Affiliation to Advance Pediatric Care". Rush University System for Health. Archived from the original on January 24, 2021. Retrieved January 27, 2021.
  77. ^ "Patient Care: Feinberg School of Medicine: Northwestern University". www.feinberg.northwestern.edu. Archived from the original on June 19, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  78. ^ "U.S. News Top Medical Schools". Archived from the original on January 29, 2017. Retrieved July 14, 2014.
  79. ^ MD, Stanford T. Shulman (2014). Children's Memorial Hospital of Chicago. Arcadia Publishing. p. 113. ISBN 978-1-4671-1108-9. Archived from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  80. ^ "10 things to know about Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital". Beckers Hospital Review. February 23, 2015. Archived from the original on July 7, 2017. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  81. ^ Candid. "Lurie Children's Hospital Receives Gift for Pediatric Research". Philanthropy News Digest (PND). Archived from the original on July 24, 2017. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  82. ^ "Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute Moves Onto the Campus of Its Medical Partners Creating The Promise of Greater Impact for Pediatric Research". www.luriechildrens.org. Archived from the original on October 20, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  83. ^ "Nursing Professional Opportunities". www.luriechildrens.org. Archived from the original on September 30, 2020. Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  84. ^ Bean, Mackenzie (August 14, 2019). "Spotlight on Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago: 4 quick facts". Beckers Hospital Review. Archived from the original on September 13, 2019. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  85. ^ "Our Houses & Family Rooms". Ronald McDonald House Charities of Chicagoland & NW Indiana. Archived from the original on October 20, 2020. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  86. ^ "Apply to Stay". Ronald McDonald House Charities of Chicagoland & NW Indiana. Archived from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  87. ^ "Ronald McDonald Family Room in Lurie Children's". Ronald McDonald House Charities of Chicagoland & NW Indiana. Archived from the original on October 24, 2020. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  88. ^ "New Ronald McDonald House To Open In Streeterville". CBS Chicago. June 25, 2012. Archived from the original on September 7, 2015. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  89. ^ Sudo, Chuck (August 24, 2012). "In Pictures: Old Ronald McDonald House Demolition". The Chicagoist. Archived from the original on November 6, 2017. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  90. ^ Bertagnoli, Lisa (August 20, 2018). "AbbVie donates $100 million to Ronald McDonald House". Crain's Chicago Business. Archived from the original on November 9, 2020. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  91. ^ "Ronald McDonald House Near Lurie Children's Hospital Unveils Expansion". November 15, 2019. Archived from the original on August 5, 2020. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  92. ^ "Ronald McDonald House near children's hospital damaged during recent Chicago looting". www.healthleadersmedia.com. Archived from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  93. ^ Hauck, Grace; Miller, Ryan W. (August 13, 2020). "Ronald McDonald House near children's hospital damaged during recent Chicago looting". USA TODAY. Archived from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  94. ^ "Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago". www.childrenshospitals.org. Archived from the original on April 11, 2020. Retrieved January 31, 2021.
  95. ^ "Magnet Hospitals". American Nurse Credentialing Center. Archived from the original on April 26, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  96. ^ "Chicago's Lurie Children's Hospital a Model of Evidence-Based Design". ASID Icon. June 4, 2013. Archived from the original on November 25, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  97. ^ "Design Awards – 2012". Modern Healthcare. September 15, 2012. Archived from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  98. ^ "Top Hospitals | Leapfrog". June 13, 2016. Archived from the original on June 13, 2016. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  99. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on June 27, 2012. Retrieved June 18, 2012.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  100. ^ "Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago – 150 Great Places to Work in Healthcare – 2014". Beckers Hospital Review. Archived from the original on July 29, 2017. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  101. ^ "Verified Children's Surgery Centers". American College of Surgeons. Archived from the original on November 7, 2016. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  102. ^ "Ann & Robert H. Lurie Childrens Hospital of Chicago". Forbes. Archived from the original on September 12, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  103. ^ "2020 Digital Health Most Wired Results" (PDF). College of Healthcare Information Management Executives. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2021.
  104. ^ McFarlane, E; Olmsted, M; Murphy, J; Drozd, E; Pitts, A (2007). "America's Best Children's Hospitals: 2007 methodology" (PDF). RTI International. U.S. News & World Report. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved January 17, 2020.
  105. ^ Olmsted, M. G., McFarlane, E., Murphy, J., Severance, J., Pitts, A., Morley, M., & Drozd, E. M. (2010). U.S. News & World Report: Best Children's Hospitals 2010 methodology Archived January 18, 2021, at the Wayback Machine. U.S. News & World Report.
  106. ^ "Children's Memorial Hospital – US News Best Children's Hospitals 2011". November 3, 2011. Archived from the original on November 3, 2011. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  107. ^ "Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago in Chicago, IL – Rankings, Ratings & Photos | US News Best Hospitals". June 12, 2017. Archived from the original on June 12, 2017. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  108. ^ Harder, Ben; Comarow, Avery (June 26, 2018). "Best Children's Hospitals 2018–19: Honor Roll and Overview | Best Hospitals | US News". Archived from the original on October 29, 2018. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  109. ^ Schencker, Lisa (June 26, 2018). "Lurie again ranked among nation's top 10 children's hospitals". baltimoresun.com. Archived from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  110. ^ "Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago in Chicago, IL – Rankings, Ratings & Photos | US News Best Children's Hospitals Rankings". July 28, 2020. Archived from the original on July 28, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  111. ^ "Best Children's Hospitals". U.S. News & World Report. 2021. Archived from the original on April 3, 2020.
  112. ^ "Susan L. Cohn, MD". www.uchicagomedicine.org. Archived from the original on November 25, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  113. ^ "John F. Sarwark, MD". June 10, 2010. Archived from the original on June 10, 2010. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  114. ^ Shulman, Stanford T. (2014). Children's Memorial Hospital of Chicago. Images of America. Charleston: Arcadia. p. 26. ISBN 978-1-4396-4445-4. Archived from the original on January 31, 2021. Retrieved January 18, 2021.

External links[edit]