Lutetium(III) fluoride

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Lutetium(III) fluoride
Kristallstruktur Yttrium(III)-fluorid.png
Names
Other names
lutetium trifluoride
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.033.945 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 237-355-8
UNII
  • InChI=1S/3FH.Lu/h3*1H;/q;;;+3/p-3
    Key: VIHLFTMKXFWYAS-UHFFFAOYSA-K
  • F[Lu](F)F
Properties
LuF3
Molar mass 231.97g/mol[1]
Appearance white powder[1]
Density 8.29 g/cm3[1]
Melting point 1,184[2] °C (2,163 °F; 1,457 K)
Boiling point 2200°C[1]
n/a[1]
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS06: ToxicGHS07: Exclamation mark
Danger
H301, H311, H315, H319, H331, H335
P261, P264, P270, P271, P280, P301+P310, P302+P352, P304+P340, P305+P351+P338, P311, P312, P321, P322, P330, P332+P313, P337+P313, P361, P362, P363, P403+P233, P405, P501
Related compounds
Other anions
Lutetium(III) chloride
Lutetium(III) bromide
Other cations
Scandium(III) fluoride
Yttrium(III) fluoride
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Lutetium(III) fluoride is an inorganic compound with a chemical formula LuF3.

Production[edit]

Lutetium(III) fluoride can be produced by reacting lutetium oxide with hydrogen fluoride, or reacting lutetium chloride and hydrofluoric acid:[3]

Lu2O3 + 6 HF → 2 LuF3 + 3 H2O
LuCl3 + 3 HF → LuF3 + 3 HCl

It can also be produced by reacting lutetium sulfide and hydrofluoric acid:[4]

3 Lu
2
S
3
+ 20 HF + (2 + 2x) H
2
O → 2 (H
3
O)Lu
3
F
10
·xH
2
O↓ + 9 H
2
S↑
 (x = 0.9)
(H3O)Lu3F10 → 3 LuF3 + HF↑ + H2O↑

Lutetium oxide and nitrogen trifluoride react at 240 °C to produce LuOF. A second step happens below 460 °C to produce LuF3.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Lutetium Fluoride".
  2. ^ K.M Lyapunov, A.V Baginskii, S.V Stankus (June 2004). "Experimental study of the enthalpy of lutetium trifluoride in solid and liquid states". Journal of Alloys and Compounds. 372 (1–2): 7–9. doi:10.1016/j.jallcom.2003.09.139.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  3. ^ Georg Brauer (ed.), In collaboration with Marianne Baudler u. a .: Handbook of Preparative Inorganic Chemistry. 3rd, revised edition. Volume I, Ferdinand Enke, Stuttgart 1975, ISBN 3-432-02328-6 , p. 254.
  4. ^ O.V. Andrrev, I.A. Razumkova, A.N. Boiko (March 2018). "Synthesis and thermal stability of rare earth compounds REF 3 , REF 3 · n H 2 O and (H 3 O)RE 3 F 10 · n H 2 O (RE = Tb − Lu, Y), obtained from sulphide precursors". Journal of Fluorine Chemistry. 207: 77–83. doi:10.1016/j.jfluchem.2017.12.001.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  5. ^ Randall D. Scheele, Bruce K. McNamara, Andrew M. Casella, Anne E. Kozelisky, Doinita Neiner (February 2013). "Thermal NF3 fluorination/oxidation of cobalt, yttrium, zirconium, and selected lanthanide oxides". Journal of Fluorine Chemistry. 146: 86–97. doi:10.1016/j.jfluchem.2012.12.013.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)