Luvale language

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Native to Angola, Zambia
Ethnicity Lovale
Native speakers
640,000 (2001–2010)[1]
Standard forms
Ngangela (Angola)
Latin (Luvale alphabet)
Luvale Braille
Official status
Recognised minority
language in
Language codes
ISO 639-3 lue
Glottolog luva1239[2]

Luvale (also spelled Chiluvale, Lovale, Lubale, Luena, Lwena) is a Bantu language spoken by the Lovale people of Angola and Zambia. It is recognized as a regional language for educational and administrative purposes in Zambia, where about 168,000 (2006) people speak it.

Luvale is closely related to Chokwe.

In fiction[edit]

In the Swedish 1997 murder mystery novel "Faceless Killers", Inspector Kurt Wallander investigates a murderous racist attack on a refugee center in Skane and finds it difficult to communicate with a witness who speaks only the Luvale language. The problem is resolved when a 90-year-old woman is found, who is a former missionary who speaks Luvale fluently, and she acts as the interpreter.


  1. ^ Luvale at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  2. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Luvale". Glottolog. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  3. ^ Jouni Filip Maho, 2009. New Updated Guthrie List Online

External links[edit]