Luxembourg national football team

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 Luxembourg
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) d'Roud Léiwen
Les Lions Rouges
Die Roten Löwen

(The Red Lions)
Association Luxembourg Football Federation
(Fédération Luxembourgeoise
de Football)
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Luc Holtz
Captain Mario Mutsch
Most caps Jeff Strasser (98)
Top scorer Léon Mart (16)
Home stadium Stade Josy Barthel
FIFA code LUX
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 145 Increase 2 (1 June 2017)
Highest 93 (April 1996)
Lowest 195 (August 2006)
Elo ranking
Current 159 Steady (7 May 2017)
Highest 76 (28 July 1946)
Lowest 190 (October 2004 to January 2006, September 2007)
First international
 Luxembourg 1–4 France 
(Luxembourg City, Luxembourg; October 29, 1911)
Biggest win
 Luxembourg 6–0 Afghanistan 
(London, United Kingdom; July 26, 1948)
Biggest defeat
 Luxembourg 0–9 England 
(Luxembourg City, Luxembourg; October 19, 1960)
 England 9–0 Luxembourg 
(London, United Kingdom; December 15, 1982)

The Luxembourg national football team (nicknamed the Red Lions; Luxembourgish: Lëtzebuergesch Foussballnationalequipe, French: Équipe du Luxembourg de football, German: Luxemburgische Fußballnationalmannschaft) is the national football team of Luxembourg, and is controlled by the Luxembourg Football Federation. The team plays most of its home matches at the Stade Josy Barthel in Luxembourg City.

Luxembourg has participated in FIFA World Cup qualifiers since those for the 1934 World Cup and in UEFA European Championship qualifiers since those for Euro 1964. As of 2016, they never qualified for any of these major tournaments. The national side of Luxembourg did compete in six Olympic football events between 1920 and 1952.[1]

History[edit]

The Luxembourg national football team in 1920 (left), and in 2015

Luxembourg played their first ever international match on 29 October 1911, in a friendly match against France; it resulted in a 1–4 defeat.[1] Their first victory came on 8 February 1914, also in a match against France, which they won 5–4.[1]

The national side of Luxembourg competed in six Olympic football events between 1920 and 1952, and survived the preliminary round twice (in 1948 and 1952).[1] In between, Luxembourg started participating at qualifiers for the FIFA World Cup, but as of 2014 they still never qualified.

Starting in 1921, the Luxembourg national A-selection would play 239 unofficial international matches until 1981, mostly against other country's B-teams like those of Belgium, France, Switzerland and West Germany, as well as a team representing South-Netherlands.[2]

After their last Olympic tournament in 1952, the national team also started playing in qualifying groups for UEFA European Championships, but could not reach the major European tournament end stages. The only time that the team was close to qualify was for a European or World Championship was for the Euro 1964. In the first qualification round they defeated the Netherlands with a score of 3–2 on aggregate after two matches. A Dutch newspaper commented this stunt after the second match with "David Luxembourg won with 2–1 [against Goliath Netherlands]".[3] In the round of eight, Luxembourg and Denmark fought for a spot in the final tournament. The winner was decided after three matches; Denmark was the winner with a total score of 6–5.

When the national team does win a competitive match, they are often celebrated by national media and fans, as was the case after a 2–1 win against Switzerland in 2008.[4]

Uniform[edit]

Traditionally, the badge on Luxembourg's team outfit displays a shield very similar to Luxembourg's lesser coat of arms, a red lion on a white-blue striped background – hence the team's nickname Red Lions. In modern times, the team played home games in entirely red strips, in accordance with their nickname, and wore white as away colour.

Home stadium[edit]

Stade Josy Barthel

The Luxembourg national team normally plays its home matches at the Stade Josy Barthel in Luxembourg City, the national stadium of Luxembourg. At this location, the national team played 235 games by August 2015, including unofficial games.[5] It is also used for rugby union and athletics.

Originally called Stade Municipal after its construction in 1928–1931, it was entirely rebuilt in 1990. Since July 1993, it has carried the name of Josy Barthel, the 1500m gold medalist at the 1952 Olympics and Luxembourg's only Olympic gold medal winner.[6] The stadium is also home to the biggest athletics club in the country, CAL Spora Luxembourg. The spectator capacity is 8,000;[7] some seats are under cover, some in the open air.

Management[edit]

The following managers have been in charge of Luxembourg's national squad:

Name[8] Nationality Luxembourg
career
Paul Feierstein  Luxembourg 1933–1948
Jean-Pierre Hoscheit
Jules Müller
Albert Reuter
 Luxembourg 1948–1949
Adolf Patek  Austria 1949–1953
Béla Volentik  Hungary 1953–1955
Eduard Havlicek  Austria 1955
Nándor Lengyel  Hungary 1955–1959
Pierre Sinibaldi  France 1959–1960
Robert Heinz  West Germany 1960–1969
Ernst Melchior  Austria 1969–1972
Gilbert Legrand  France 1972–1977
Arthur Schoos  Luxembourg 1978
Louis Pilot  Luxembourg 1978–1984
Jozef Vliers  Belgium 1984
Josy Kirchens  Luxembourg 1985
Paul Philipp  Luxembourg 1985–2001
Allan Simonsen  Denmark 2001–2004
Guy Hellers  Luxembourg 2004–2010
Luc Holtz  Luxembourg 2010–present

Current staff[edit]

Current Luxembourg manager Luc Holtz

The crew that guides the Luxembourg national team includes following members:[9]

Position Name
Manager Luc Holtz
Goalkeeping coach Frank Thieltges
Physical coach Claude Origer
Technical director Reinhold Breu
Team doctors Marc Reuter
Robert Huberty
Physiotherapists Yannick Zenner
Ben Moes

Players[edit]

In 2004, the Luxembourg Football Federation selected Louis Pilot as their Golden Player, Luxembourg's greatest player of the past 50 years.[10]

Current squad[edit]

The following 24 players were called up for the 2018 FIFA World Cup qualifier match match against Netherlands on 9 June 2017.[11]
Caps and goals as of 9 June 2017 after the match against Netherlands.

0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1GK Ralph Schon (1990-01-20) 20 January 1990 (age 27) 5 0 Luxembourg Strassen
1GK Valentin Roulez (lb) (1996-12-12) 12 December 1996 (age 20) 0 0 Luxembourg Mondercange
1GK Emanuel Cabral (lb) (1996-08-02) 2 August 1996 (age 20) 0 0 Luxembourg Fola Esch

2DF Mario Mutsch (1984-09-03) 3 September 1984 (age 32) 94 4 Switzerland St. Gallen
2DF Chris Philipps (1994-03-08) 8 March 1994 (age 23) 40 0 France Metz
2DF Maxime Chanot (1990-01-21) 21 January 1990 (age 27) 25 2 United States New York City FC
2DF Kevin Malget (1991-01-15) 15 January 1991 (age 26) 20 1 Luxembourg F91 Dudelange
2DF Ricardo Delgado (1994-02-22) 22 February 1994 (age 23) 10 0 Luxembourg Jeunesse Esch
2DF Enes Mahmutovic (1997-05-22) 22 May 1997 (age 20) 4 0 England Middlesbrough
2DF Tim Hall (1997-04-15) 15 April 1997 (age 20) 1 0 Germany SV Elversberg
2DF Aldin Skenderovic (lb) (1997-06-28) 28 June 1997 (age 20) 0 0 Luxembourg Union Titus Pétange

3MF Lars Gerson (1990-02-05) 5 February 1990 (age 27) 60 4 Sweden GIF Sundsvall
3MF Mathias Jänisch (1990-08-27) 27 August 1990 (age 26) 47 1 Luxembourg Differdange 03
3MF Laurent Jans (1992-08-05) 5 August 1992 (age 24) 40 0 Belgium Waasland-Beveren
3MF Christopher Martins (1997-02-19) 19 February 1997 (age 20) 20 0 France Lyon Reserves
3MF Sébastien Thill (1993-12-29) 29 December 1993 (age 23) 10 1 Luxembourg Progrès Niederkorn
3MF Vincent Thill (2000-02-04) 4 February 2000 (age 17) 9 1 France Metz
3MF Gerson Rodrigues (1995-06-20) 20 June 1995 (age 22) 4 0 Luxembourg Fola Esch
3MF Eric Veiga (1997-02-18) 18 February 1997 (age 20) 2 0 Germany Eintracht Braunschweig II
3MF Jan Ostrowski (1999-04-14) 14 April 1999 (age 18) 1 0 Germany Eintracht Frankfurt II

4FW Stefano Bensi (1988-08-11) 11 August 1988 (age 28) 42 4 Luxembourg Fola Esch
4FW Maurice Deville (1992-07-31) 31 July 1992 (age 24) 34 3 Germany FSV Frankfurt
4FW David Turpel (1992-10-19) 19 October 1992 (age 24) 28 2 Luxembourg F91 Dudelange
4FW Florian Bohnert (1997-11-09) 9 November 1997 (age 19) 10 1 Germany Schalke 04 II

Recent call-ups[edit]

The following players have also been called up to the Luxembourg squad during last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Anthony Moris (1990-04-29) 29 April 1990 (age 27) 7 0 Belgium Mechelen v.  Cape Verde, 28 March 2017
GK Youn Czekanowicz (lb) (2000-08-08) 8 August 2000 (age 16) 0 0 Belgium Gent II v.  Cape Verde, 28 March 2017
GK Jonathan Joubert (1979-09-12) 12 September 1979 (age 37) 86 0 Luxembourg F91 Dudelange v.  Bulgaria, 6 September 2016

DF Dirk Carlson (1998-04-01) 1 April 1998 (age 19) 4 0 Luxembourg Union Titus Pétange v.  Cape Verde, 28 March 2017
DF Yann Marques (lb) (1996-11-12) 12 November 1996 (age 20) 0 0 Luxembourg Union Titus Pétange v.  Cape Verde, 28 March 2017
DF Kevin Kerger (1994-11-17) 17 November 1994 (age 22) 1 0 Luxembourg Strassen v.  Netherlands, 13 November 2016
DF Pit Simon (lb) (2000-02-04) 4 February 2000 (age 17) 0 0 France Metz v.  Belarus, 10 October 2016
DF Tom Laterza (1992-05-09) 9 May 1992 (age 25) 34 0 Luxembourg Fola Esch v.  Bulgaria, 6 September 2016

MF Dwayn Holter (1995-06-15) 15 June 1995 (age 22) 11 0 Luxembourg Fola Esch v.  Netherlands, 13 November 2016
MF Ben Payal (1988-09-08) 8 September 1988 (age 28) 73 0 Luxembourg Strassen v.  Bulgaria, 6 September 2016

FW Daniel da Mota (1985-09-11) 11 September 1985 (age 31) 77 5 Luxembourg F91 Dudelange v.  Cape Verde, 28 March 2017
FW Aurélien Joachim (Captain) (1986-08-10) 10 August 1986 (age 30) 67 12 Belgium Lierse v.  Cape Verde, 28 March 2017

PRE Preliminary squad.

Previous squads[edit]

Most capped players[edit]

As of 28 March 2017.

# Player[12] Caps Period
1 Jeff Strasser 98 1993–2010
2 Mario Mutsch 94 2005–
3 René Peters 93 2000–2013
4 Eric Hoffmann 89 2002–2014
5 Carlo Weis 87 1978–1998
6 Jonathan Joubert 86 2006–
7 François Konter 77 1955–1969
8 Daniel Da Mota 77 2007–
9 Roby Langers 73 1980–1998
10 Ben Payal 73 2006–

Top goalscorers[edit]

# Player[12] Goals Period
1 Léon Mart 16 1939–1945
2 Gustave Kemp 15 1938–1945
3 Camille Libar 14 1938–1947
4 Nicolas Kettel 13 1946–1959
5 François Müller 12 1949–1954
5 Aurélien Joachim 12 2005–
7 Léon Letsch 11 1947–1963

Competitive record[edit]

FIFA World Cup[edit]

The Luxembourg team in 1969, before a World Cup qualifier
FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
Uruguay 1930 Did not enter Did not enter
Italy 1934 Did not qualify 2 0 0 2 2 15
France 1938 2 0 0 2 2 7
Brazil 1950 2 0 0 2 4 8
Switzerland 1954 4 0 0 4 1 19
Sweden 1958 4 0 0 4 3 19
Chile 1962 4 1 0 3 5 21
England 1966 6 0 0 6 6 20
Mexico 1970 6 0 0 6 4 24
West Germany 1974 6 1 0 5 2 14
Argentina 1978 6 0 0 6 2 22
Spain 1982 8 0 0 8 1 23
Mexico 1986 8 0 0 8 2 27
Italy 1990 8 0 1 7 3 22
United States 1994 8 0 1 7 2 17
France 1998 8 0 0 8 2 22
South KoreaJapan 2002 10 0 0 10 4 28
Germany 2006 12 0 0 12 5 48
South Africa 2010 10 1 2 7 4 25
Brazil 2014 10 1 3 6 7 26
Russia 2018 6 0 1 5 6 17
Qatar 2022 To be determined
Total 0/21 130 4 8 118 67 424

UEFA European Championship[edit]

Luxembourg UEFA European Championship record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA
France 1960 Did not enter
Spain 1964 To France 2016 Did not qualify
European Union 2020 To be determined
Total 0/15

Summer Olympics[edit]

Hectic phase during the goal-rich Olympic defeat against Belgium in 1928 (5–3)
Summer Olympics record of the Luxembourg national football team[1]
Edition Round Pld W D L GF GA
Belgium Antwerp 1920 Round 1 1 0 0 1 0 3
France Paris 1924 Round 2 1 0 0 1 0 2
Netherlands Amsterdam 1928 Round 1 1 0 0 1 3 5
Nazi Germany Berlin 1936 Round 1 1 0 0 1 0 9
United Kingdom London 1948 Round 1 2 1 0 1 7 6
Finland Helsinki 1952 Round 1 2 1 0 1 6 5
Total 8 2 0 6 16 30

Minor tournaments[edit]

Luxembourg minor tournaments record[13]
Year Round Pos Pld* W D L GF GA
Indonesia 1980 Marah Halim Cup Semi-finals 4th 7 3 1 3 8 11
*Two of these seven matches, played against the Indonesian clubs Pardedetex and NIAC Mitra (that ended in 1–0 and 2–1 wins for Luxembourg, respectively) are not regarded as full internationals by the Luxembourg Football Federation.

Results and forthcoming fixtures[edit]

As of August 2015, the Luxembourg national team played 353 official games which resulted in 25 wins, 41 draws and 287 losses, with 205 goals for and 1004 against.[1][A]

Recent results and fixtures are as follows:

2016[edit]

2017[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Note that the friendly against Belgium on 26 May 2014 is not FIFA-recognised due to an excessive number of Belgian substitutions.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Barrie Courney (4 Dec 2014). "Luxembourg – List of International Matches". RSSSF. Retrieved 31 August 2012. 
  2. ^ Barrie Courtney (8 Mar 2005). "Luxembourg – List of Unofficial International matches". RSSSF. Retrieved 12 Sep 2015. 
  3. ^ "Schwartz' droombeeld werd nachtmerrie voor publiek". Nieuwsblad van het Noorden (in Dutch). 31 Oct 1963. Retrieved 23 Aug 2015. 
  4. ^ "RTL Lëtzebuerg". De Journal. 7 September 2008. 
  5. ^ "Stade Josy Barthel, Lëtzebuerg". eu-football.info. Retrieved 23 Aug 2015. 
  6. ^ "Unique person for a unique place" (PDF). GSSE News – The Official Newspaper of the Games of the Small States of Europe in Luxembourg 2013. Luxembourg. 27 May 2013. p. 3. Retrieved 22 October 2013. 
  7. ^ http://www.uefa.com/MultimediaFiles/Download/FirstDiv/uefaorg/Publications/01/67/03/93/1670393_DOWNLOAD.pdf
  8. ^ "Les entraîneurs nationaux du Luxembourg" (in French). profootball.lu. Retrieved 31 August 2012. 
  9. ^ "Cadre". Fédération Luxembourgeoise de Football. Retrieved 12 Sep 2015. 
  10. ^ "Golden Players take centre stage". UEFA. Archived from the original on 2008-05-19. Retrieved 2008-05-24. 
  11. ^ "Match amical international : Luxembourg A – Albanie A, dimanche 04.06.2017". 
  12. ^ a b "Luxembourg – Record International Players". RSSSF. Archived from the original on 29 April 2008. Retrieved 23 September 2013. 
  13. ^ "Marah Halim Cup (Medan, Indonesia)". RSSSF. Retrieved 2 October 2013. 
  14. ^ "Rules & Governance – Law 3: The number of players". The FA. Archived from the original on 2014-10-25. Retrieved 25 Oct 2014. 

External links[edit]