Lynda Voltz

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The Honourable
Lynda Voltz
MLC
Member of Legislative Council of New South Wales; Shadow Minister for Sport; Shadow Minister for Veterans' Affairs
Assumed office
24 March 2007
Personal details
Born 1965 (age 51–52)
Hornsby, New South Wales, Australia
Political party Australian Labor Party
Children Two
Education Birrong Girls High School
Occupation Soldier, clinical counsellor, political staffer
Military service
Allegiance Australia
Service/branch Australian Army
Years of service 1987–1993
Unit Royal Australian Corps of Military Police

Lynda Jane Voltz (born 1965) is an Australian politician and Australian Labor Party member of the New South Wales Legislative Council. Voltz has been a member of the Council since March 2007.[1] As of April 2016, Lynda Voltz is also the Shadow Minister for Sport and Veterans' Affairs.[2]

Voltz was born in Hornsby on Sydney's North Shore, and attended Birrong Girls High School.[3]

Voltz joined the Australian Army Reserve in 1984, and in 1987 she became one of the first women to the join the regular Australian Army as one of the second group of women to train alongside men at Army Recruit Training Centre at Kapooka. She joined the Royal Australian Corps of Military Police, as it was one of the few field force units women were allowed to join.[4]

After leaving the army, she worked as a political staffer for state MP Sandra Nori, federal member for Sydney Peter Baldwin, and then as an electoral officer for Senator John Faulkner. At the 1995 New South Wales state election, she contested the district of North Shore but was defeated by the Liberal candidate, Jillian Skinner.[3]

She has two daughters, Katerina and Anastasia.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Hon. Lynda Jane Voltz, MLC". Parliament of New South Wales. 2015. Retrieved 15 July 2016. 
  2. ^ http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-03-10/nsw-labor-reshuffle-sees-ryan-park-become-shadow-treasure/7235210
  3. ^ a b "Voltz, Lynda (c. 1965 - )". The Australian Women's Register. Retrieved 15 May 2015. 
  4. ^ Kamenev, Marina (1 October 2009). "How Soon Will Australia's Female Soldiers Be on the Frontlines?". TIME. Retrieved 15 May 2015. 
  5. ^ "Inaugural Speech of the Honourable Lynda Voltz" (PDF). NSW Hansard. Retrieved 15 May 2015.