Lynn Stalmaster

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Lynn Stalmaster
Born(1927-11-17)November 17, 1927
DiedFebruary 12, 2021(2021-02-12) (aged 93)
EducationMA, UCLA TFT 1952[1]
OccupationCasting director
Years active1950–2006
Spouse(s)
Gloria McGough
(m. after 1956, divorced)

Shirley A. Alexander
(m. 1962; div. 1972)
Children2
AwardsAMPAS Honorary 2016

Lynn Arlen Stalmaster (November 17, 1927 – February 12, 2021) was an American casting director. He was noted as the first casting director to be conferred an Academy Award, having received an Honorary Oscar in 2016.

Early life[edit]

Stalmaster was born in Omaha, Nebraska, on November 17, 1927.[2] He was the son of Estelle (Lapidus) and Irvin A. Stalmaster, a lawyer who became a judge.[3] Irvin was the first Jewish person, as well as the youngest person, to be appointed to a Nebraska district judgeship.[4][5] He was also active in the local Jewish community, serving as president of the Omaha B'nai B'rith.[6] Lynn Stalmaster's younger brother is actor Hal Stalmaster (born 1940), best-known for his starring role in the Disney film Johnny Tremain.[7]

Lynn Stalmaster initially attended Dundee Elementary School in Omaha's Dundee–Happy Hollow Historic District.[4] In order to ameliorate his severe asthma, his family later relocated to Beverly Hills, California, where he attended Beverly Hills High School.[2][8] There he overcame his shyness by immersing himself in theatre and radio.[4] After serving in the U.S. Army, he studied theater arts at the UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television, obtaining a Master of Arts in 1952.[1][8][3]

Career[edit]

Stalmaster got his first job in show business as an actor, appearing in the war movies The Steel Helmet (1951), The Flying Leathernecks (1951),[9] and the TV series Big Town.[10] As a fail-safe plan, he was employed by Grosse-Krasne as a production assistant.[8][10] He subsequently became casting director after the incumbent retired,[2][11] and went on to cast five on-air series.[8]

After several years in that capacity, Stalmaster became an independent casting director.[10][11] He established himself quickly as a solid casting director, finding steady work in both television and motion pictures. He was credited with casting more than 60 movies of the decade, among them; Fiddler on the Roof, Harold and Maude, The Cowboys, Deliverance, Rollerball, Silver Streak, Black Sunday, Coming Home, Convoy, The Rose, Superman and Being There.[9]

Stalmaster was responsible for casting TV shows such as Gunsmoke,[8] The Untouchables, and My Favorite Martian.[10][11] He was also a part of Academy Award winning movies such as In the Heat of the Night, The Thomas Crown Affair, The Right Stuff,[9] and Brian De Palma's The Untouchables.[12]

Stalmaster was the first casting director to receive credit on a separate card in the main titles of a feature film, starting with The Thomas Crown Affair in 1968.[8][11] His name subsequently appeared in the main titles of over 180 films,[8] credited as "Casting by Lynn Stalmaster."[13]

Later life[edit]

Stalmaster was conferred the Career Achievement Award by the Casting Society of America (CSA) in 2003.[8] Thirteen years later, in November 2016,[2] he received an Academy Honorary Award from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.[14][15] He was the first casting director to receive an Academy Award.[16] Two years later, the Casting Society of America began honoring entertainment professionals with the Lynn Stalmaster Award for Career Achievement. Recipients include Annette Bening,[17] Laura Dern,[18] and Geena Davis.[19]

Stalmaster died on the morning of February 12, 2021, at his home in Los Angeles. He was 93.[2][11]

Partial filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Green, Noah (December 2, 2016). "Lynn Stalmaster Accepts First Oscar for Casting". UCLA TFT. Retrieved December 16, 2019. Congratulations to TFT alumnus Lynn Stalmaster (MA '52), ...
  2. ^ a b c d e Haring, Bruce (February 12, 2021). "Lynn Stalmaster Dies: Academy Award-Winning Casting Director Was 93". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved February 13, 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ a b "Lynn Stalmaster". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. November 3, 2016. Retrieved May 31, 2020.
  4. ^ a b c The Jewish Press (Omaha): "Hollywood insiders return Home for Jewish Reunion" by Sherrie Saag July 30, 2014
  5. ^ The Wisconsin Jewish Chronicle: "Young Jewish Lawyer appointed Judge of Dist. Court, Nebraska" April 27, 1928 – Page 17
  6. ^ Jewish Telegraph Agency: "Stalmaster is Appointed Judge in Nebraska Court", April 17, 1928
  7. ^ Interview with Hal Stalmaster
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h Oscar Biographies: "Lynn Stalmaster" retrieved July 22, 2017
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf "Lynn Stalmaster". American Film Institute. Retrieved February 12, 2021.
  10. ^ a b c d Littleton, Cynthia (February 12, 2021). "Lynn Stalmaster, Legendary Casting Director, Dies at 93". Variety. Retrieved February 13, 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  11. ^ a b c d e Barnes, Mike (February 12, 2021). "Lynn Stalmaster, Legendary Casting Director, Dies at 93". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved February 13, 2021.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac "Lynn Stalmaster". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved February 12, 2021.
  13. ^ "Lynn Stalmaster, Pioneering Casting Director, Now in Spotlight at 86". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved May 31, 2020.
  14. ^ "Academy Announces Jackie Chan, Anne Coates, Lynn Stalmaster, and Frederick Wiseman will receive 2016 Governors Awards". oscar.go.com. Retrieved May 31, 2020.
  15. ^ "Lynn Stalmaster to accept first Academy Award for casting". The Seattle Times. November 10, 2016. Retrieved May 31, 2020.
  16. ^ O'Falt, Chris (November 9, 2016). "Casting Directors and the Academy: Why Lynn Stalmaster's Honorary Oscar Matters". IndieWire. Retrieved May 31, 2020.
  17. ^ Hipes, Patrick (November 30, 2016). "Annette Bening To Receive Career Achievement Artios Award". Deadline. Retrieved May 31, 2020.
  18. ^ Pedersen, Erik (December 3, 2018). "Artios Awards Career Honors To Laura Dern, Tina Fey & Others". Deadline. Retrieved May 31, 2020.
  19. ^ Hipes, Patrick (December 12, 2019). "Artios Awards To Honor Geena Davis, Audra McDonald & More". Deadline. Retrieved May 31, 2020.
  20. ^ "Judgment at Nuremberg (1961)". British Film Institute. Retrieved February 12, 2021.
  21. ^ "Judgment at Nuremberg (1961) – Credits". Turner Classic Movies. Retrieved February 12, 2021.
  22. ^ Horton, Andrew (August 31, 2010). The Films of George Roy Hill, rev. ed. McFarland. p. 191. ISBN 9780786446841.
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "Lynn Stalmaster". British Film Institute. Retrieved February 12, 2021.
  24. ^ "Stir Crazy (1980) – Credits". Turner Classic Movies. Retrieved February 13, 2021.
  25. ^ "Caveman (1981) – Credits". Turner Classic Movies. Retrieved February 13, 2021.

External links[edit]