Lynn Valley

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Lynn Valley is a neighbourhood of North Vancouver, British Columbia. Located at the northern edge of Metro Vancouver, it is nestled between the forested slopes of Mount Fromme and Mount Seymour. The area is well known for its natural parks, including Lynn Headwaters Regional Park, the Lower Seymour Conservation Reserve (formerly known as the 'Seymour Demonstration Forest') and Lynn Canyon Park, whose main attraction is the Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge. Lynn Valley is named after British Royal Engineer John Linn (Royal Engineer), who settled in the area after 1869. The main intersection of Lynn Valley Road and Mountain Highway is the location of the newly completed Main Library and Town Centre. The area is now known as Lynn Valley Village. As of 2007, Lynn Valley has experienced a surge in housing prices, along with much of Vancouver, with average home prices near $1,000,000.

Recently, Lynn Valley has had a Town Centre, designed by architect Gregory Henriquez, built next to the Lynn Valley Shopping Centre, which is home to an array of shops and conveniences (including Delany's coffee house, the newly updated North Vancouver District Public Library, the Red Tulip Gift Gallery, YYoga, Dream Designs, Waves Coffee, Vancity credit union, a tanning salon, a chiropractic office and Papa John's Pizza. Starting in the Fall of 2015, Bosa will begin sales and re-development of the Lynn Valley Shopping Centre with the construction of 359 - 1, 2 and 3 bedroom condominium homes. The project is slated to have 6 concrete air-conditioned towers in 2 Phases ranging from 4 to 12 storeys. Now named The Residences at Lynn Valley, the project is expected to take 3-4 years to complete and will add over 350 new family sized condominium homes and over 50,000 sq.ft. of new retail space for the shopping centre.

Natural features[edit]

Lynn Canyon Park contains approximately 250 hectares (620 acres) of land area, which some have characterized as relatively "unspoilt".[1] One of the tallest known specimen of Douglas fir tree was once located in Lynn Valley.[2]


Line notes[edit]

  1. ^ Matthew Gardner and Alison Bigg, 2003
  2. ^ C. Michael Hogan. 2008