Lynnside Historic District

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Lynnside Historic District
Lynnside in Sweet Springs.jpg
Lynnside in Sweet Springs, 1974
Lynnside Historic District is located in West Virginia
Lynnside Historic District
Lynnside Historic District is located in the US
Lynnside Historic District
Location Junction of WV 3 and Cove Creek Road, near Sweet Springs, West Virginia
Coordinates 37°32′42″N 80°41′14″W / 37.54500°N 80.68722°W / 37.54500; -80.68722Coordinates: 37°32′42″N 80°41′14″W / 37.54500°N 80.68722°W / 37.54500; -80.68722
Area 40 acres (16 ha)
Built 1845
Architectural style Greek Revival
NRHP Reference # 91000452[1]
Added to NRHP April 26, 1991

Lynnside Historic District is a national historic district located near Sweet Springs, Monroe County, West Virginia. The district includes six contributing buildings, three contributing sites, and two contributing structures. It consists of three contiguous properties related to the Lewis family home, known as "Lynnside." The main house was built in 1845 on the site of a previous plantation house, and is a 1 1/2 story, rectangular masonry dwelling in the Greek Revival style. It measures 70 feet by 40 feet. A fire in 1933, destroyed the roof and porticos. Also on the property are four wooden barns dated to about 1900. Located nearby is the Lewis Family Cemetery, that includes the grave of Virginia Governor John Floyd (1783-1837), and the adjacent Catholic Cemetery dated to 1882. The district also includes St. John's Catholic Chapel (1853-1859), a simple masonry Greek Revival style building, and the adjacent "New Cemetery."[2]

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1991.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ Michael J. Pauley (January 1991). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Lynnside Historic District" (PDF). State of West Virginia, West Virginia Division of Culture and History, Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2011-08-18. 

External links[edit]