Lyons-Knight

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The Lyons-Knight was an American automobile manufactured from 1913 until 1915 in Indianapolis, Indiana by three brothers James W., William P. and George W. Lyons by purchasing the previous Atlas Engine Works and reorganizing the company as the Lyons-Atlas Company.[1] Previously, the Atlas Company manufactured two-stroke gasoline and diesel engines that developed a line of gasoline engines using the Knight sleeve valve design.[1] Starting in 1913, the Lyons-Knight Model K offered a four-cylinder engine that produced 50 BHP and was installed in a choice of five or seven passenger touring car, sedan, or berline using a 130" wheelbase. Prices started at USD$2,900 ($75,937 in 2020 dollars [2]) for the five passenger touring sedan while the berline sedan was USD$4,300 ($112,596 in 2020 dollars [2]).[1] For 1915 only, a six-cylinder engine was offered with the same wheelbase in either a five or seven passenger touring sedan for USD$3,200 ($83,793 in 2020 dollars [2]) along with the previous four cylinder engine, and a limousine and roadster before operations ended soon after when Knox resigned from the company in August.[1]

The cars exclusively featured Knight sleeve valve engines and worm-drive rear axles; they were designed by Harry A. Knox who had previously worked at the Atlas-Knight Automobile Company in Springfield, Massachusetts until the company went bankrupt.[1]

There were several companies that used Knight sleeve valve engines, and the company name incorporated the word "Knight" into the name. They were Atlas-Knight, Stearns-Knight and Lyons-Knight. None survived after 1929.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Kimes, Beverly (1996). Standard catalog of American Cars 1805–1942 (third ed.). Krause publications. p. 912. ISBN 0-87341-478-0.
  2. ^ a b c 1634–1699: McCusker, J. J. (1997). How Much Is That in Real Money? A Historical Price Index for Use as a Deflator of Money Values in the Economy of the United States: Addenda et Corrigenda (PDF). American Antiquarian Society. 1700–1799: McCusker, J. J. (1992). How Much Is That in Real Money? A Historical Price Index for Use as a Deflator of Money Values in the Economy of the United States (PDF). American Antiquarian Society. 1800–present: Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. "Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–". Retrieved January 1, 2020.

David Burgess Wise, The New Illustrated Encyclopedia of Automobiles