Māllīnātha

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Māllīnātha
19th Jain Tirthankara
Mallinatha
Footprints at Mallinatha Tonk, Shikharji
Venerated in Jainism
Predecessor Aranatha
Successor Munisuvrata
Symbol Urn or Kalasa
Height 25 dhanusha (75 meters)
Age 56,000 years
Color Blue
Personal Information
Born Ayodhya
Moksha Shikharji
Parents
  • Kumbha (father)
  • Rakshita (mother)

Māllīnātha (Prakrit Mālliṇātha, "Lord of jasmine or seat") was the 19th tīrthaṅkara "ford-maker" of the present avasarpiṇī age in Jainism. Jain texts indicate Mālliṇāha was born at Mithila into the Ikshvaku dynasty to King Kumbha and Queen Prajâvatî. Tīrthaṅkara Māllīnātha lived for over 56,000 years, out of which 54,800 years less six days, was with omniscience (Kevala Jnana).

According to the Digambara tradition, Mallinatha was a son born in a royal family, and worships Mallinatha as a male.[1][2] However, the Svetambara tradition of Jainism rejects this, and states that Māllīnātha was female.[3]

Biography[edit]

Māllīnātha (Prakrit Mālliṇāha, "Lord Jasmine") was the 19th tīrthaṅkara "ford-maker" of the present avasarpiṇī age in Jainism.[4] Jain scriptures indicate Mālliṇāha was born at Mithila into the Ikshvaku dynasty to King Kumbha and Queen Prajâvatî.[5][4] Tīrthaṅkara Māllīnātha lived for over 56,000 years, out of which 54,800 years less six days, was with omniscience (Kevala Jnana).[6]

According to Jain beliefs, Mālliṇāha became a siddha, a liberated soul which has destroyed all of its karma.[7]

Literature[edit]

  1. Jnatrdharmakathah gives the story of Lord Mallinath is said to be composed by Ganadhara Sudharmaswami.[citation needed]
  2. Mallinathapurana was written by Nagachandra in 1105 CE.[citation needed]

Main Temples[edit]

See also[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Dundas 2002, p. 56.
  2. ^ Umakant P. Shah 1987, pp. 159-160.
  3. ^ Vallely 2002, p. 15.
  4. ^ a b Tukol 1980, p. 31.
  5. ^ Vijay K. Jain 2015, p. 202.
  6. ^ Vijay K. Jain 2015, p. 203.
  7. ^ Jaini 1998, p. 40n.
  8. ^ Sandhya, C D’Souza (19 November 2010), Chaturmukha Basadi: Four doors to divinity Last updated, Deccan Herald 

Sources[edit]