This is a good article. Click here for more information.

M-87 (Michigan highway)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

M-87 marker

M-87
M-87 as it appeared in 1957
Route information
Length: 11.564 mi[2] (18.610 km)
Existed: c. July 1, 1919[1]c. 1960[3][4]
Major junctions
West end:
Bus. US 23 in Fenton
East end: US 10 in Springfield Township
Location
Counties: Genesee, Oakland
Highway system
M-86 M-88

M-87 is the designation of a former state trunkline highway in the Lower Peninsula of the US state of Michigan, which prior to 1960 ran east–west between the towns of Fenton and Holly. The highway served as a connector between US Highway 23 (US 23) and the former routing of US 10, which ran along what is now the Interstate 75 (I-75) corridor. The highway connected the downtown areas of each community as well as running through then-rural areas of Genesee and Oakland counties. The trunkline was decommissioned in late 1960, removing it from the system.

Route description[edit]

Immediately before decommissioning, M-87 began at a junction with Business US 23 (Bus. US 23, Leroy Street) east of the Shiawassee River in the town of Fenton. From there the road traveled to the east along Main Street,[3][5] where it crossed a branch rail line of the present-day CSX Transportation.[6] and headed east out of town in Genesee County. After about one mile (1.6 km), the highway crossed into Oakland County and followed Grange Hall Road south of Seven Lakes State Park. The road then turned south in the town of Holly along Saginaw Street. Near Bevins Lake, the street curved to the east around the end of the lake. The highway turned east on Maple Street and ran south of Simonson Lake as it continued eastward out of Holly.[3][5] The road crossed a branch line of the present day Canadian National Railway in Springfield Township.[6] The trunkline continued to the east and southeast through rural areas before terminating at US 10 (Dixie Highway).[3][5]

History[edit]

M-87 on November 1, 1956

M-87 was assumed into the state trunkline system by July 1, 1919,[1] when the system was first signed.[7] At the time, the highway connected M-65 in Fenton with M-10 east of Holly. Later when the United States Numbered Highway System was created on November 11, 1926, those two highways were renumbered US 23 and US 10 respectively.[8] The highway was fully paved in 1937.[9][10] In 1958, Fenton was bypassed by the Fenton–Clio Expressway to the west of downtown.[11] and the former route through downtown was redesignated Bus. US 23.[12] M-87 was removed from the state trunkline system and turned back to local control in late 1960.[3][4]

Major intersections[edit]

County Location mi[2] km Destinations Notes
Genesee Fenton 0.000 0.000
Bus. US 23 – Flint, Ann Arbor
Western terminus
Oakland Springfield Township 11.564 18.610 US 10 – Flint, Detroit Eastern terminus; present day Dixie Highway
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (July 1, 1919). State of Michigan (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. Lower Peninsula sheet. OCLC 15607244. Retrieved December 18, 2016 – via Archives of Michigan. 
  2. ^ a b Michigan Department of Transportation & Michigan Center for Shared Solutions and Technology Partnerships (2009). MDOT Physical Reference Finder Application (Map). Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 9, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Michigan State Highway Department (1960). Official Highway Map (Map). [c. 1:918,720]. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § L12. OCLC 12701120, 81552576.  (Includes all changes through July 1, 1960)
  4. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (1961). Official Highway Map (Map). [c. 1:918,720]. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § L12. OCLC 12701120, 51857665.  (Includes all changes through July 1, 1961)
  5. ^ a b c Google (March 12, 2008). "Overview Map of the Former M-87" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved March 12, 2008. 
  6. ^ a b Michigan Department of Transportation (January 2011). Michigan's Railroad System (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved February 1, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Michigan May Do Well Following Wisconsin's Road Marking System". The Grand Rapids Press. September 20, 1919. p. 10. OCLC 9975013. 
  8. ^ Bureau of Public Roads & American Association of State Highway Officials (November 11, 1926). United States System of Highways Adopted for Uniform Marking by the American Association of State Highway Officials (Map). 1:7,000,000. Washington, DC: U.S. Geological Survey. OCLC 32889555. Retrieved November 7, 2013 – via University of North Texas Libraries. 
  9. ^ Michigan State Highway Department & Rand McNally (May 15, 1937). Official Michigan Highway Map (Map) (Summer ed.). [c. 1:850,000]. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § L12. OCLC 12701143. Retrieved December 18, 2016 – via Archives of Michigan. 
  10. ^ Michigan State Highway Department & Rand McNally (December 1, 1937). Official Michigan Highway Map (Map) (Winter ed.). [c. 1:850,000]. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § L12. OCLC 12701143. Retrieved December 18, 2016 – via Archives of Michigan. 
  11. ^ "Fenton–Clio X-Way Big Time Saver". Argus-Press. Owosso, MI. Associated Press. June 28, 1958. p. 9. OCLC 36134862. Retrieved April 20, 2011. 
  12. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (1958). Official Highway Map (Map). [c. 1:918,720]. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § L12. OCLC 12701120, 51856742. Retrieved December 18, 2016 – via Archives of Michigan.  (Includes all changes through July 1, 1958)

External links[edit]

Route map: Bing / Google

KML is from Wikidata