M-Tel Masters

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Mtel Masters was an annual super-GM chess tournament held between 2005 and 2009 in Sofia, Bulgaria, sponsored and organized by the Bulgarian mobile network operator, M-Tel. The tournament was held as a double round-robin at the five-star Grand Hotel Sofia.

Tournament winners[edit]

M-Tel Masters Sofia
Date Category Average FIDE Rating Winner Score TPR
1 11–22 May 2005 XX 2747  Veselin Topalov (Bulgaria) 6½ / 10 2850
2 10–21 May 2006 XX 2745  Veselin Topalov (Bulgaria) 6½ / 10 2842
3 9–20 May 2007 XIX 2725  Veselin Topalov (Bulgaria) 5½ / 10 2751
4 8–18 May 2008 XX 2738  Vassily Ivanchuk (Ukraine) 8 / 10 2977
5 12–23 May 2009 XXI 2755  Alexei Shirov (Spain) 6½ / 10 2867

Editions[edit]

2005[edit]

The first edition of the tournament took place between 11 and 22 May 2005 as part of M-Tel's tenth anniversary celebrations and with the participation of top chess players such as Viswanathan Anand, Veselin Topalov, Vladimir Kramnik, Michael Adams, Judit Polgár and Ruslan Ponomariov. M-Tel Masters 2005 was classified in FIDE's Category 20 and was named the strongest tournament of 2005 according to the average Elo rating of the participants of 2744. The winner of the tournament was the Bulgarian Veselin Topalov, with the award being conferred by President Georgi Parvanov.

1st M-Tel Masters, 12–22 May 2005, Sofia, Bulgaria, Category XX (2747)[1]
Player Rating 1 2 3 4 5 6 Points TPR
1  Veselin Topalov (Bulgaria) 2778 ½ 1 ½ ½ 0 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 2850
2  Viswanathan Anand (India) 2785 ½ 0 Does not appear ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 2775
3  Judit Polgár (Hungary) 2732 ½ ½ ½ ½ Does not appear ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 5 2749
4  Ruslan Ponomariov (Ukraine) 2695 1 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ Does not appear 0 1 ½ ½ 5 2757
5  Vladimir Kramnik (Russia) 2753 ½ 0 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 0 Does not appear 0 ½ 4 2673
6  Michael Adams (England) 2737 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ Does not appear 4 2676

2006[edit]

The 2006 tournament took place between 10 May and 21 May and was attended by Veselin Topalov, Viswanathan Anand, Ruslan Ponomariov, Peter Svidler, Étienne Bacrot and Gata Kamsky. Brazilian writer Paulo Coelho played the token initial move of the 2006 tournament, which was officially opened by the President of Bulgaria, Georgi Parvanov.

Topalov won the tournament for the second time after a decisive comeback from a somewhat hesitant start. He recorded four consecutive wins in the final rounds to clinch the M-Tel Masters 2006 first place with 6½ points, also defeating his main rival Gata Kamsky in the penultimate round.

2nd M-Tel Masters, 11–21 May 2006, Sofia, Bulgaria, Category XX (2745)[2]
Player Rating 1 2 3 4 5 6 Points Wins TPR
1  Veselin Topalov (Bulgaria) 2804 1 1 0 1 ½ 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 2842
2  Gata Kamsky (United States) 2671 0 0 Does not appear 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 6 2831
3  Viswanathan Anand (India) 2803 1 0 0 ½ Does not appear ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 2768
4  Peter Svidler (Russia) 2743 ½ 1 0 ½ ½ ½ Does not appear 1 0 ½ ½ 5 2744
5  Ruslan Ponomariov (Ukraine) 2738 ½ 0 ½ 0 0 ½ 0 1 Does not appear ½ ½ 1 2635
6  Étienne Bacrot (France) 2708 ½ 0 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ Does not appear 0 2641

2007[edit]

M-Tel Masters' 2007 edition was held between 9 May and 20 May and featured Veselin Topalov, Liviu-Dieter Nisipeanu, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov, Gata Kamsky, Michael Adams and Krishnan Sasikiran. Topalov won the tournament for a third consecutive time in a dramatic fashion, defeating the then-current leader Sasikiran in the final round.

3rd M-Tel Masters, 10–20 May 2007, Sofia, Bulgaria, Category XIX (2725)[3]
Player Rating 1 2 3 4 5 6 Points Wins H2H SB Moves TPR
1  Veselin Topalov (Bulgaria) 2772 1 1 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 1 ½ ½ 2751
2  Krishnan Sasikiran (India) 2690 0 0 Does not appear ½ 1 1 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 5 3 2732
3  Shakhriyar Mamedyarov (Azerbaijan) 2757 1 ½ ½ 0 Does not appear 1 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 5 2 2 25.25 2718
4  Gata Kamsky (United States) 2705 ½ ½ 0 1 0 1 Does not appear ½ ½ ½ ½ 5 2 2 25.00 547 2729
5  Liviu-Dieter Nisipeanu (Romania) 2693 1 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ Does not appear 0 1 5 2 2 25.00 419 2731
6  Michael Adams (England) 2734 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 0 Does not appear 2687

2008[edit]

The 2008 M-Tel Masters was held 8–18 May. Vassily Ivanchuk won by a wide margin. Ivanchuk won his first five games, lost no games, and had a positive score against every other player. Veselin Topalov, who had won the tournament the three previous years, was second.

4th M-Tel Masters, 8–18 May 2008, Sofia, Bulgaria, Category XX (2738)[4]
Player Rating 1 2 3 4 5 6 Points TPR
1  Vassily Ivanchuk (Ukraine) 2740 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 8 2977
2  Veselin Topalov (Bulgaria) 2767 0 ½ Does not appear ½ ½ 1 1 1 0 1 1 2841
3  Teimour Radjabov (Azerbaijan) 2751 0 ½ ½ ½ Does not appear ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 2771
4  Ivan Cheparinov (Bulgaria) 2695 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ Does not appear 1 1 ½ ½ 4 2674
5  Bu Xiangzhi (China) 2708 0 ½ 0 1 ½ 0 0 0 Does not appear ½ ½ 3 2594
6  Levon Aronian (Armenia) 2763 0 ½ 0 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ Does not appear 3 2583

2009[edit]

The 2009 edition of the tournament took place from 12 to 23 May. Besides regular feature Veselin Topalov, the participating grandmasters were Magnus Carlsen, Vassily Ivanchuk, Alexei Shirov, Wang Yue and Leinier Domínguez.

5th M-Tel Masters, 13–23 May 2009, Sofia, Bulgaria, Category XXI (2755)[5]
Player Rating 1 2 3 4 5 6 Points Wins H2H TPR
1  Alexei Shirov (Spain) 2745 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 2867
2  Magnus Carlsen (Norway) 2770 0 ½ Does not appear 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 6 3 2824
3  Veselin Topalov (Bulgaria) 2812 ½ ½ 0 ½ Does not appear 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 6 3 ½ 2816
4  Wang Yue (China) 2738 ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ Does not appear ½ ½ 1 ½ 2723
5  Leinier Domínguez (Cuba) 2721 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ Does not appear ½ 0 4 2690
6  Vassily Ivanchuk (Ukraine) 2746 0 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ 1 Does not appear 3 2608

2010[edit]

The tournament was cancelled because of the World Chess Championship 2010 match in Sofia.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mark Crowther (23 May 2005). "The Week in Chess 550". The Week in Chess. 
  2. ^ Mark Crowther (22 May 2006). "The Week in Chess 602". The Week in Chess. 
  3. ^ Mark Crowther (21 May 2007). "The Week in Chess 654". The Week in Chess. 
  4. ^ Mark Crowther (19 May 2008). "The Week in Chess 706". The Week in Chess. 
  5. ^ Mark Crowther (25 May 2009). "The Week in Chess 759". The Week in Chess.