M60 recoilless gun

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M60
Yugo 82mm M60.png
82-mm M60 recoilless gun
Type Recoilless rifle
Place of origin  Yugoslavia
Service history
Used by See Users
Wars Yugoslav Wars
Syrian Civil War[1][2]
Production history
Designed 1960s
Specifications
Weight 122 kg (269 lb)
Length 2.20 m (7.2 ft)
Height 0.83 m (2.7 ft)
Crew 5

Shell HEAT
Elevation -20 to +35°[3]
Traverse 360°
Rate of fire 4 rpm
Muzzle velocity 388 m/s (1,270 ft/s)
Effective firing range 500 m (1,600 ft)
Maximum firing range 4,500 m (2.8 mi)
Sights Optical

The M60 recoilless gun is an 82-mm antitank recoilless gun developed[citation needed] in the former Yugoslavia. It entered service with the Yugoslav People's Army in the 1960s.

Description[edit]

The M60 is mounted on a towing carriage with wheels for transport and firing. Aiming is done with an optical sight. Ammunition for the M60 includes two fin-stabilized HEAT rounds. The first HEAT projectile for the M60 had an effective range of 500 meters. The second was an improved version that used a rocket booster to increase the effective range to 1,000 meters.[4]

The maximum range of the piece is 4,700 meters. Direct fire is limited to 1,500 meters against stationary targets and 1,000 meters against moving targets. The M60 is credited with a 220mm penetration of armor with its HEAT round.[5]

Aimsight for 82mm M60 recoilless rifle

Users[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BvBVX_hmIS4
  2. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EMnB8pDqPSg
  3. ^ JIW, p. 746.
  4. ^ WEG, p. 62.
  5. ^ JIW, p. 747. Sources from post-Yugoslavian republics claim later rounds increased armor penetration to 300 - 400mm.
  6. ^ http://atwar.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/25/weapons-from-the-former-yugoslavia-spread-through-syrias-war/?_r=0

Bibliography[edit]

  • (JIW) Hogg, Ian. Jane's Infantry Weapons 1984-85, London: Jane's Publishing Company Ltd., 1984.
  • (WEG) U.S. Army. Worldwide Equipment Guide 2001, Training and Doctrine Command, 2001.