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MAX Green Line

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MAX Green Line
MAX train on Portland Transit Mall.jpg
A two-car train on Northwest 5th Avenue of the Portland Transit Mall in 2009
Overview
TypeLight rail
SystemMAX Light Rail
StatusOperational
LocalePortland, Oregon, U.S.
TerminiPSU South in downtown Portland (west)
Clackamas Town Center Transit Center (east)
Stations30
Daily ridership20,640 (as of September 2018)[1]
WebsiteMAX Green Line
Operation
OpenedSeptember 12, 2009 (2009-09-12)
OwnerTriMet
Operator(s)TriMet
CharacterAt-grade and elevated
Rolling stock
Technical
Line length15 mi (24.1 km)[2]
Number of tracks2
Track gauge4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge
Electrification750 V DC, overhead catenary
Route diagram

PSU South/SW 6th & College Terminus
PSU South/SW 5th & Jackson
PSU Urban Ctr/SW 6th & Montgomery
Portland Streetcar
 A  Loop &  NS  Line (SW Mill/SW Montgomery St)
PSU Urban Ctr/SW 5th & Mill
Portland Streetcar
 B  Loop &  NS  Line (SW Market St)
SW 6th & Pine
City Hall/SW 5th & Jefferson
to Gresham to Airport
Pioneer Courthouse
Pioneer Place
SW 6th & Pine
SW 5th & Oak
NW 6th & Davis
NW 5th & Couch
Union Station/NW 6th & Hoyt
Amtrak
Union Station/NW 5th & Glisan Terminus
Amtrak
Rose Quarter TC
Stadium - The Noun Project.svg
Convention Center
Portland Streetcar
 B  Loop (NE Grand Ave)
 A  Loop (NE 7th Ave)
NE 7th
Portland Streetcar
Lloyd Center/NE 11th
Hollywood/NE 42nd TC
NE 60th
NE 82nd
Gateway/NE 99th TC
Parking
to Gresham to Airport
SE Main
Parking
SE Division
SE Powell
Parking
SE Holgate
Parking
Lents Town Center/SE Foster
SE Flavel
SE Fuller
Parking
Clackamas Town Center TC
Parking

The MAX Green Line is a light rail service in Portland, Oregon, United States, owned and operated by TriMet as part of the MAX Light Rail system. It extends from downtown Portland to the eastside community of Clackamas, connecting Portland State University (PSU), Portland City Center, the Northeast and Southeast sections of Portland, and Clackamas Town Center. The line is 15 miles (24.1 km) long and serves 30 stations between the PSU South stations and Clackamas Town Center Transit Center. It is the only service that shares parts of its alignment with the four other MAX services. It shares the Portland Transit Mall with the Orange Line and the Yellow Line, and the Banfield segment of the Eastside MAX with the Blue Line and the Red Line. Southbound from Gateway/Northeast 99th Avenue Transit Center, the Green Line serves an exclusive segment along Interstate 205 (I-205), referred to as the I-205 MAX. It runs for approximately 21​12 hours daily with a headway of fifteen minutes during most of the day. The line is the third busiest in the system, carrying an average of 20,640 riders per day on weekdays in September 2018.

Planning for the first light rail services to Clackamas County began in the mid-1980s with the announcement of two separate lines: one between downtown Portland and Oregon City via Milwaukie, and another between Portland International Airport and Clackamas Town Center via I-205. Feasibility studies conducted in the early 1990s eventually shifted plans away from I-205 and culminated in the South–North Line proposal. This failed to secure voter-backed funding over several ballot measures, resulting in the plan's cancellation in 1998. In 2001, regional planners reconvened and developed the South Corridor transportation project, a two-phased revision of the initial proposal that sought the addition of light rail to I-205 and the Portland Transit Mall in its first phase. With the support of local governments and residents, the project was approved in 2003. Construction of the two segments began in early 2007, and the Green Line opened on September 12, 2009.

There are currently plans to expand MAX to Southwest Portland, Tigard, and Tualatin. If approved by voters in 2020, the Green Line would be extended from its PSU South termini in downtown Portland to Bridgeport Village via Southwest Barbur Boulevard. By 2027, the extension would bring light rail service closer to the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) campus on Marquam Hill, Portland Community College (PCC) Sylvania, and the Tigard Triangle, among others.

I-205 history[edit]

Early proposals[edit]

Photograph of Clackamas Town Center in the background with part of its parking lot in the foreground
Clackamas Town Center in 2011

In the mid-1980s, the Metro regional government announced plans to introduce light rail to Clackamas County with the proposal of two lines: one between Portland International Airport and Clackamas Town Center via I-205, and the other between downtown Portland and Oregon City via Milwaukie.[3] A panel of local and state officials, known as the Joint Policy Advisory Committee on Transportation (JPACT), affirmed their endorsement of an I-205 line in 1987, with a request to start preliminary engineering for light rail in lieu of an originally planned busway.[4][5] The preferred alignment had been the I-205 Transitway, an unfinished, grade-separated transit right-of-way built during I-205's construction in the late 1970s and early 1980s.[6] As planning for what would become the Westside MAX (Blue Line) extension to Washington County took priority for federal funding, TriMet called on local businesses and governments in Clackamas County to subsidize the proposed $88 million route.[7] A dispute between Washington and Clackamas county officials followed, with Clackamas County vying for additional federal assistance, including $17 million in excess funds sourced from the partially realized I-205 Transitway.[8][9]

In January 1989, in an effort to settle the dispute, Metro approved a ten-year regional transportation plan in which it reasserted the westside line's priority and commissioned preliminary work on the I-205 line, as well as a study for a line to Milwaukie.[10] The U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations approved a financing package in September, which provided $2 million to assess both segments. At the behest of Oregon Senator Mark Hatfield and Washington Senator Brock Adams, who were members of the committee, a northbound segment to Clark County, Washington, became part of the proposals.[11][12] Initial studies examined extending the proposed I-205 line further north across the Columbia River to Vancouver Mall or the Clark County Fairgrounds.[13][14] As the studies analyzed various alternative routes, however, support eventually shifted to an alignment along the busier Interstate 5 (I-5) and Willamette River corridors.[15] A 25-mile (40 km) route from Hazel Dell, Washington through downtown Portland to Clackamas Town Center, called the South–North Line was finalized in 1994.[16] Estimated to cost around $2.8 billion, Portland area voters approved a $475 million bond measure on November 8, 1994, to cover Oregon's share.[17] A Clark County vote to fund Washington's portion, which would have been sourced through sales and vehicle excise tax increases, was subsequently defeated on February 7, 1995.[18]

TriMet later sought funding for various scaled-back revisions of the South–North Line, generally following a route between North Portland and Clackamas Town Center, which voters rejected in 1996 and 1998.[19][20] In 1997, an unsolicited proposal from Bechtel led to a public–private partnership that built an extension of MAX to Portland International Airport using the northern half of the I-205 Transitway, now served by the Red Line.[21] In 1999, North Portland residents and businesses persuaded TriMet to revive the northern portion of the South–North project,[22] resulting in the construction of the Interstate MAX for the Yellow Line in 2004.[23]

Revival and funding[edit]

Photograph of the MAX Green Line under construction shows the underpass under Glisan Street and two new track lines—one completed. They are next to the Blue Line tracks at right in this photo. The exit ramp from northbound I-205 to Glisan Street is at the left.
Construction under way along I-205 north of Burnside Street in 2008, with the Blue Line tracks at right

When a Metro planning committee convened on May 7, 2001, to discuss a revived light rail proposal to downtown Milwaukie, the panel also revisited the idea of running MAX on I-205, from Gateway/Northeast 99th Avenue Transit Center to Clackamas Town Center.[24] The following month, the committee announced the $8.8 million South Corridor transportation study to evaluate both options.[25] In 2002, a supplemental draft environmental impact statement (EIS), based on the original South–North Line EIS was published.[26]:P–1 Metro narrowed down five mode alternatives in January 2003; these included building both light rail lines, a combination of one light rail service and one improved bus service, bus rapid transit, and dedicated bus lanes.[27] The study's task force recommended both light rail options in February; they proposed a two-phased development plan, starting with the addition of light rail to I-205 by 2009,[28] and the completion of the Portland to Milwaukie route (Orange Line) five years later.[29] The I-205 corridor was selected for the first phase due to the existing I-205 Transitway right-of-way and the potential for no new taxes.[30] With the approval of local residents,[31][32] affected jurisdictions each endorsed this proposal by April 2003.[28][33] An amendment to include adding tracks on the Portland Transit Mall as part of the first phase was prepared the following October.[26]:P–2 TriMet published the final EIS in December 2004 and began land acquisition for park and ride facilities in November 2005.[2][34] The combined I-205 MAX and transit mall revitalization project was approved by the federal government on February 7, 2006.[35]

The project was budgeted at $575.7 million (equivalent to $669 million in 2018 dollars),[36] of which approximately $220 million went to the Portland Transit Mall.[37] Federal funding, which covered 60 percent, or about $345 million of the total cost, was approved in February 2006 under the New Starts program.[38][39] The head of the FTA signed the full-funding agreement in Portland on July 3, 2007.[40] In May 2009, the project received $32 million in federal stimulus funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, an amount already committed to the project by the federal government but made available so that TriMet could retire debt earlier.[41] TriMet negotiated a local match of 40 percent, or $197.4 million (unadjusted) of total funding in July 2004. Of this, the City of Portland provided $15 million in bonds paid off by raising parking meter fees, $17 million from a local improvement district, and $6.3 million from systems and utilities charges.[42] Around $36 million came from Clackamas County urban renewal funds, collected from property taxes within the Clackamas Town Center urban renewal district.[43][44] TriMet contributed $20.5 million,[45] and the Portland Development Commission provided $20 million.[42] An additional $15.3 million was spent by downtown businesses to improve retail spaces along the transit mall.[46]

Construction and opening[edit]

Photograph of the MAX Green Line's tunnel under I-205 with a southbound train entering it
The north portal of the tunnel under I-205, originally built in the early 1980s for the I-205 Transitway

TriMet awarded the construction of the I-205 MAX to South Corridor Constructors, a joint venture composed of Stacy and Witbeck, F.E. Ward Constructors—both of which had worked on the preceding Interstate MAX project—and Granite Construction Company; it was granted through a design–build contract in February 2004.[47] Construction along I-205 commenced in February 2007.[39][48] This marked the start of a 2​12-year closure of sections of the I-205 Bike Path.[49] A new mixed-use path, linking Clackamas County to the South Park Blocks in downtown Portland, was paved as a permanent alternative.[50][51] Preliminary work involved erecting light rail bridges over Southeast Johnson Creek Boulevard and Southeast Harold Street, and excavating light rail underpasses below Southeast Stark and Washington streets.[50] Crews were at work along the 3-mile (4.8 km), two-station segment within Clackamas County by November 2007.[52] The line was over 70 percent complete by November 2008, with tracks laid from Gateway Transit Center to Southeast Flavel Street.[53] TriMet ordered 22 Siemens S70 cars to serve the expansion. Referred to as Type 4, the first car was delivered in 2009;[54] it made its first test run in March and entered service on August 6, 2009.[55][56] The line's first end-to-end test run, attended by local and state dignitaries, occurred in July 2009.[57]

Green Line service commenced on September 12, 2009.[58][59] The two extensions added a total of 8.3 miles (13.4 km) of newly constructed light rail tracks. The I-205 section accounted for 6.5 miles (10.5 km)—the Portland Transit Mall section, 1.8 miles (2.9 km).[60][61] Opening day festivities, paid for by sponsors and donations, were held at Clackamas Town Center and PSU. As many as 40,000 people showed up to ride the trains, which were free that day.[58] To address its $31 million budget deficit, TriMet simultaneously eliminated four bus routes and implemented service cuts to 49 other lines.[62]

Transit mall revitalization[edit]

Photograph of construction on 5th Avenue at Yamhill Street
Construction along 5th Avenue from Yamhill Street, shown in July 2007

A north–south light rail alignment through downtown Portland had been considered as early as the 1980s. In 1991, following recommendations made by a citizen advisory committee, the Portland City Council commissioned a feasibility study for a potential subway line beneath the 1977-built Portland Transit Mall on 5th and 6th avenues, then served only by buses.[63] During the planning stages of the South–North Line in 1994, government planners introduced a surface light rail alternative,[64] which was later favored by the project's steering committee when it concluded a $250 million tunnel would be too costly.[65][66] Following the cancellation of the South–North Line, the city reserved revitalization efforts for the transit mall amid proposals to rebuild it to allow curbside parking in 2002.[67]

In 2003, TriMet planners began to reconsider the addition of light rail to the Portland Transit Mall. Planning for the second phase of the South Corridor transportation study, which aimed to extend MAX south to Milwaukie, revealed that a fourth service on the existing tracks along Southwest Morrison and Yamhill streets, served already by the Blue, Red, and Yellow lines, would push the downtown alignment to maximum capacity.[68] Additionally, Portland business leaders pushed for the construction of a new bridge that would lead to the southern end of the transit mall instead of using the Hawthorne Bridge,[69] fearing the latter would form a bottleneck.[27][29] A study conducted subsequently by TriMet proposed stations on either the left, right, or middle lanes of the transit mall,[70] and planners selected a hybrid center-lane travel with right-side boarding option in April 2004.[71] Local governments approved the revitalization plan by the following month,[72] combining it with the first-phase construction of the I-205 MAX.[26]:P–2 Consisting of seven stations per split on 5th and 6th Avenues,[2] the project extended the existing transit mall from 44 to 117 block faces between Portland Union Station and PSU.[73] It also added a travel lane for private vehicles, which had been omitted from the corridor's original design.[74]

Photograph of a Max train on the left, a bus in the center and a woman on a bicycle making a turn off the Portland Transit Mall
A Green Line train on Southwest 5th Avenue of the Portland Transit Mall

The contract was awarded to a joint venture of Stacy and Witbeck and Kiewit Pacific.[74] Preparation work began with the rerouting of 17 bus lines to 3rd and 4th avenues, six lines to Southwest Columbia and Jefferson streets, and one line, the 14–Hawthorne, to Southwest 2nd Avenue.[75][76] Construction commenced on January 14, 2007, with the corridor's temporary closure.[77][78] Owing to techniques learned from the Interstate MAX project, businesses were kept open while blocks were closed off in three- to four-block sections from north to south,[79][80] minimizing disruptions.[81] The original transit mall had been built with mortar-set bricks, which proved difficult to maintain. In the reconstruction, TriMet experimented with sand-set brick paving as recommended by British civil engineer John Knapton, who studied road building methods used by the Romans.[82] Tracks were laid 25 inches (64 cm) into the surface street, while water pipes and sewers were buried 6 feet (1.8 m) to 25 feet (7.6 m) underground.[74] The last section of rail on the transit mall was installed in May 2008.[83] From June to August 2008, the upper deck of the Steel Bridge was closed to connect the existing MAX tracks with the new tracks.[84] 5th and 6th Avenues reopened to vehicular traffic in July 2008, two months ahead of schedule.[85] TriMet began line testing in January 2009, initially with cars hauled by a truck,[86] then with the system's new Type 4 trains.[87]

Bus service returned to the transit mall on May 24, 2009.[88] Three months later, on August 30, 2009, the light rail portion opened with inaugural service from the Yellow Line, which was rerouted from its original downtown alignment with the Blue and Red lines on First Avenue and Southwest Morrison and Yamhill streets.[89] Green Line trains began serving the Portland Transit Mall during the opening of the I-205 MAX on September 12, 2009.[58]

Proposed Southwest Corridor extension[edit]

Southwest Corridor
proposed route
Bridgeport Village
Parking
SW Upper Boones Ferry Rd
Parking
SW Bonita Rd
Parking
SW Hall Blvd
WES Commuter Rail
SW Elmhurst St
SW 68th Pkwy
Parking
SW 53rd Ave
Parking
Barbur Transit Center
Parking
SW 30th Ave
SW 19th Ave
SW Custer Dr
SW Hamilton St
SW Gibbs St
PSU South/SW 6th & College
PSU South/SW 5th & Jackson

A proposed expansion of MAX, referred to as the Southwest Corridor light rail project, would add 13 stations over a new 12-mile (19 km) extension, and connect downtown Portland to Southwest Portland and the cities of Tigard and Tualatin. The line would start from the southern end of the Portland Transit Mall at the PSU South stations and head south over Interstate 405 (I-405). It would run between Marquam Hill to the west and I-5 to the east, and proceed southwest beyond Capitol Highway to connect with Barbur Transit Center. Two bridges would take the line over I-5 into the Tigard Triangle. It would traverse a fourth bridge over Oregon Route 217 and proceed towards Tigard Transit Center, which would connect it with WES Commuter Rail. The line would terminate at Bridgeport Village.[90]:4[91]

Much of the extension would run along the center of Southwest Barbur Boulevard, a part of Oregon Route 99W (OR 99W). It is being designed to connect riders to the upper campus of OHSU via pedestrian link and PCC Sylvania via shuttle bus. End-to-end travel time would take approximately 30 minutes.[92] At an estimated cost of $2.6 billion to $2.9 billion,[93] the project will be included in a regional transportation funding measure that will be voted on in 2020.[94] If approved, the extension is expected to open in 2027 and serve approximately 43,000 riders by 2035.[92]

Project history[edit]

Streetscape view of Downtown Tigard showing vehicles on a street with shops in the background
Downtown Tigard in 2009

A segment of OR 99W, between Portland and Sherwood, was identified as one of the region's next high capacity transit corridors in Metro's 2035 Regional Transportation Plan adopted on June 10, 2010.[95]:11–14 The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) granted Metro $2 million in January 2011 to begin studies for this area, formally called the Southwest Corridor. The funds focused on developing a viable transit option, which included alternatives such as light rail, commuter rail, streetcar, and bus rapid transit.[96] The Southwest Corridor Plan, officially launched on September 28, 2011, integrated individual land use plans begun by each of the involved communities and initiated the development of a unified transportation network.[97]:1

In June 2013, Metro released the corridor's high-capacity transit analysis, in which it selected light rail and bus rapid transit as the main alternatives.[98]:1 Citing a lack of present and future demand, the analysis eliminated further planning using the alternatives to Sherwood. A streetcar line and a high-occupancy vehicle lane on I-5, among other previously considered options, were also abandoned. In response to local opposition to the removal of automobile lanes from OR 99W in Tigard, the steering committee recommended rerouting the proposed alignment through the Tigard Triangle.[99]:3 A refinement recommendation was announced in June 2014 selecting a preliminary route from the southern end of the Portland Transit Mall in downtown Portland to just east of Tualatin station in downtown Tualatin;[100]:6–7 this was later shortened to terminate at Bridgeport Village.[91]

In May 2016, light rail was chosen as the preferred mode alternative over bus rapid transit.[101] Proposals to serve OHSU on Marquam Hill, Hillsdale, and PCC Sylvania with tunnels were dropped from the plan because they would be costly, have severe construction impacts, and attract few new transit riders.[102][103] Connecting OHSU to a surface transit line though elevators or escalators is being studied.[104] Tigard voters, after passing a measure requiring voters to approve the construction of any high-capacity transit built within city limits,[105] approved the light rail extension the following September.[106]

Route[edit]

Photograph of buildings on the left with a Green Line train crossing a bridge in the background
A Green Line train seen crossing over Foster Road in 2010

The Green Line is 15 miles (24.1 km) long; it serves three distinct segments of the MAX system: the Portland Transit Mall, Eastside MAX, and I-205 MAX.[2] The line's western termini are the PSU South stations at the southern end of the Portland Transit Mall within the PSU campus.[107] Tracks along the transit mall are split between 5th and 6th Avenues; trains travel northbound on 6th Avenue and southbound on 5th Avenue.[108] From the PSU South stations, the line traverses the length of the transit mall, which ends near Union Station.[109] Along the way, it crosses with the Portland Streetcar near the PSU Urban Center stations and with the east–west MAX lines on Yamhill and Morrison streets near the Pioneer Courthouse and Pioneer Courthouse Square.[110][111] A wye connects the tracks near the intersection of Northwest 5th Avenue and Hoyt Street.[109] The line continues southeast onto the Northwest Glisan Street Ramp and across the Willamette River via the Steel Bridge.[112]

On the east end of the Steel Bridge, the Green Line joins the Eastside MAX alignment, serving the stations between the Rose Quarter Transit Center and Gateway/Northeast 99th Avenue Transit Center.[113] On this segment, it runs at-grade along Holladay Street at the Rose Quarter and Lloyd District, and then along the northern edge of the Banfield Freeway.

Beyond Gateway Transit Center, the Green Line proceeds south, entering the I-205 MAX segment to the east of I-205. Throughout most of this stretch, the line is grade-separated as part of the I-205 Transitway, running either above or below roadway intersections. The exception is an at-grade crossing at Southeast Flavel Street.[114] Much of this segment also parallels the I-205 Bike Path. Between Southeast Lincoln and Grant streets, the tracks enter a tunnel beneath the freeway, exiting on the opposite side just north of Southeast Division Street.[6] Above Johnson Creek Boulevard, it travels on a 1,400-foot (430 m)-long overpass, the longest new structure on the alignment. South of Southeast Fuller Road station, the line dips under the Otty Road and Monterey Avenue overpasses before terminating at the Clackamas Town Center Transit Center, near Southeast Sunnyside Road.[112]

The Green Line shares its northbound alignment on the Portland Transit Mall with Yellow Line trains, which diverge towards the Expo Center in North Portland after crossing the Steel Bridge, and southbound with Orange Line trains, which continue beyond PSU South/Southwest 5th and Jackson station for Southeast Park Avenue station in Milwaukie. The Green Line also shares a portion of the Eastside MAX with Blue Line and Red Line services between Rose Quarter Transit Center and Gateway Transit Center, being the newest to serve the alignment in 2009.[112]

A geographic map of the MAX Green Line relative to the rest of the network

Stations[edit]

Stations on the Green Line
PSU South/Southwest 6th and College station, one of the Green Line's western termini
A Green Line train at the Convention Center station, which is shared with the Blue and Red lines
A train stopped at Lents Town Center/Southeast Foster Road station
Clackamas Town Center Transit Center, the Green Line's eastern terminus

The I-205 MAX, which the Green Line serves exclusively, consists of eight stations between Southeast Main Street and Clackamas Town Center Transit Center, occupying a segment of the I-205 Transitway south of the I-5 and I-205 interchange. The Portland Transit Mall, which the Green Line serves along with the Orange Line and the Yellow Line, consists of seven stations per direction. Green Line trains serve 30 stations total, of which the remaining eight are between Rose Quarter Transit Center and Gateway Transit Center, shared with the Blue Line and the Red Line.[115]

The Green Line provides connections to local and intercity bus services at various stops across the line, the Portland Streetcar at four stops in and near downtown Portland,[116] and Amtrak via Union Station.[108]

Key
Terminus
Eastbound travel only
Westbound travel only
Parking Park and ride[117]
Bicycle facilities Secure bike parking[118]
Station Location Commenced Line transfers[112] Other connections and notes[112][108][a]
PSU South/Southwest 6th and College†→ Portland
Transit
Mall
2009
PSU South/Southwest 5th and Jackson†← 2009
PSU Urban Center/Southwest 6th & Montgomery 2009 Tram interchange Portland Streetcar
PSU Urban Center/Southwest 5th & Mill 2009 Tram interchange Portland Streetcar
Southwest 6th & Madison 2009
City Hall/Southwest 5th & Jefferson 2009
Pioneer Courthouse/Southwest 6th 2009
Pioneer Place/Southwest 5th 2009
Southwest 6th & Pine 2009
Southwest 5th & Oak 2009
Northwest 6th & Davis 2009
Northwest 5th & Couch 2009
Union Station/Northwest 6th & Hoyt 2009 Amtrak Amtrak; Intercity bus service Greyhound, POINT, TCTD
Union Station/Northwest 5th & Glisan 2009 Amtrak Amtrak; Intercity bus service Greyhound, POINT, TCTD
Rose Quarter Transit Center Portland 2009 Intercity bus service C-Tran
Bicycle facilities
Convention Center 2009 Tram interchange Portland Streetcar
Northeast 7th Avenue 2009 Tram interchange Portland Streetcar
Lloyd Center/Northeast 11th Avenue 2009
Hollywood/Northeast 42nd Avenue Transit Center 2009 Bicycle facilities
Northeast 60th Avenue 2009 Bicycle facilities
Northeast 82nd Avenue 2009 Bicycle facilities
Gateway/Northeast 99th Avenue Transit Center 2009 Intercity bus service Columbia Area Transit[119]
Parking: 690 spaces; Bicycle facilities
Southeast Main Street 2009 Parking: 420 spaces; Bicycle facilities
Southeast Division Street 2009 Bicycle facilities
Southeast Powell Boulevard 2009 Parking: 391 spaces; Bicycle facilities
Southeast Holgate Boulevard 2009 Parking: 125 spaces; Bicycle facilities
Lents Town Center/Southeast Foster Road 2009 Bicycle facilities
Southeast Flavel Street 2009 Bicycle facilities
Southeast Fuller Road Clackamas 2009 Parking: 630 spaces; Bicycle facilities
Clackamas Town Center Transit Center 2009 Parking: 750 spaces; Bicycle facilities

Service[edit]

On weekdays, the Green Line operates for approximately 21​12 hours per day. The first train starts westbound at 3:40 am from Gateway Transit Center. From 4:19 am, the first five eastbound trains originate at the Ruby Junction/East 197th Avenue station as the Blue Line and change to the Green Line at Gateway Transit Center. The first trains from PSU South/Southwest 6th & College station and Clackamas Town Center Transit Center to run the full length of the line depart at 5:27 am and 4:55 am, respectively. End-to-end travel takes around 50 minutes. In the evenings, certain eastbound trains turn into the Blue Line at Rose Quarter Transit Center and terminate at Ruby Junction. The last eastbound train departs PSU South station at 12:28 am and the last westbound train departs Clackamas Town Center Transit Center at 12:41 am. On weekends, the Green Line runs on a slightly reduced schedule, beginning service approximately 40 minutes later.[120] TriMet designates the line as a Frequent Service route, with service running on a headway of fifteen minutes during most of the day, which extends up to 30 minutes in the early morning and late evening hours.[121]

Ridership[edit]

Prior to the start of construction, a PSU study estimated 46,500 new boardings along the Green Line by 2025.[122] During its first year in operation, TriMet planners projected 25,250 average weekday riders; fewer people than expected actually utilized the line on its first day of weekday service.[123] By the following month, however, TriMet recorded approximately 17,000 trips per day.[124] The average daily ridership in June 2010 was 19,500,[125] increasing to 24,300 by April 2012.[126] As of September 2018, the Green Line records an average weekday ridership of 20,640, making it the third-busiest MAX service.[1] The drop in ridership, experienced system-wide, is attributed to crime and lower-income riders being forced out of the inner city by rising housing prices.[127][128]

Note[edit]

  1. ^ This list of service connections excludes TriMet bus connections. For a complete list that includes all transfers, see: List of MAX Light Rail stations.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "September 2018 Monthly Performance Report" (PDF). TriMet. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 21, 2019. Retrieved February 21, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d Pantell, Susan (December 2009). "Portland: New Green Line Light Rail Extension Opens". Light Rail Now. Archived from the original on May 12, 2016. Retrieved September 1, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  3. ^ "Where's east side light rail going next?". The Oregonian. April 3, 1986. p. 2.
  4. ^ Bodine, Harry (September 30, 1987). "Light-rail expansion backed by officials". The Oregonian. p. B12.
  5. ^ Bodine, Harry (October 27, 1987). "Panel puts top priority on mass transit, major highway projects". The Oregonian. p. B4.
  6. ^ a b Redden, Jim (September 10, 2009). "After 35 years of waiting, TriMet's Green Line hits all the parties: Thousands ride new I-205 line that was born of a '70s freeway rebellion". Portland Tribune. Archived from the original on June 8, 2011. Retrieved May 13, 2014.
  7. ^ Kohler, Vince (May 23, 1988). "Joint efforts of business, government could spur rail line; both groups need to finance, back line along I-205, panel says". The Oregonian. p. B5.
  8. ^ Green, Ashbel (October 6, 1988). "County officials debate light-rail routes". The Oregonian. p. W1.
  9. ^ Kohler, Vince (January 17, 1991). "Clackamas County seeks federal money for rail line". The Oregonian. p. C2.
  10. ^ Bodine, Harry (January 14, 1989). "Metro OKs $1.5 billion transit plan". The Oregonian. p. D1.
  11. ^ Kohler, Vince; Stewart, Bill (September 10, 1989). "Light-rail proposals gain ground in Congress; senate panel approves transportation funding bill, aiding plans for new Oregon City, Vancouver lines". The Oregonian. p. C2.
  12. ^ Stewart, Bill (January 12, 1993). "County light-rail project gains momentum". The Oregonian. p. B2.
  13. ^ Stewart, Bill (September 24, 1989). "Clark County light-rail plans chugging along; more than $1 million will be spent on studies on both sides of the river". The Oregonian. p. C2.
  14. ^ Stewart, Bill (January 12, 1993). "County light-rail project gains momentum". The Oregonian. p. B2.
  15. ^ Oliver, Gordon (March 11, 1993). "Citizens advisory committee endorses pair of light-rail routes". The Oregonian. p. B3.
  16. ^ Maves, Norm Jr. (October 27, 1994). "25-mile route encompasses hundreds of steps". The Oregonian. p. 1.
  17. ^ Oliver, Gordon (November 10, 1994). "One down, more to go for reality of north–south rail line". The Oregonian. p. C10.
  18. ^ Oliver, Gordon (February 8, 1995). "Clark County turns down north–south light rail". The Oregonian. p. 1.
  19. ^ Oliver, Gordon; Hunsenberger, Brent (November 7, 1996). "Tri-Met still wants that rail line to Clackamas County". The Oregonian. p. D1.
  20. ^ Oliver, Gordon (November 7, 1998). "South–North Line backers find themselves at a loss after election day defeat". The Oregonian. p. B1.
  21. ^ Stewart, Bill (September 7, 2001). "Airport MAX rolls out Monday". The Oregonian. p. B1.
  22. ^ Oliver, Gordon (March 16, 1999). "New light-rail plan rises from the ashes". The Oregonian. p. 1.
  23. ^ Leeson, Fred (April 25, 2004). "The Yellow Line: Open for business". The Oregonian. p. B5.
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