Maryland Route 212

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Maryland Route 212 marker

Maryland Route 212
Maryland Route 212 highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by MDSHA
Length 10.43 mi[1] (16.79 km)
Existed 1927 – present
Major junctions
South end Riggs Road at the District of Columbia boundary in Chillum
 

MD 501 in Chillum
MD 410 in Chillum
MD 193 in Langley Park
I-95 in Beltsville

MD 206 near Beltsville
East end US 1 near Beltsville
Location
Counties Prince George's
Highway system
MD 210 MD 213

Maryland Route 212 (MD 212) is a state highway in the U.S. state of Maryland. The highway runs 10.43 miles (16.79 km) from the District of Columbia boundary in Chillum north and east to U.S. Route 1 (US 1) near Beltsville. MD 212 connects the northern Prince George's County communities of Chillum, Langley Park, Adelphi, Hillandale, Calverton, and Beltsville. The highway was constructed from Washington to Adelphi in the early 1910s and extended north through Adelphi to Hillandale in the early 1930s. A separate portion of MD 212 was built from west of US 1 through Beltsville to what is now MD 201 in the early 1930s; the two sections were unified in the early 1940s. The route was expanded to a divided highway south of Langley Park in the early 1960s and at Interstate 95 (I-95) in the early 1970s. MD 212's eastern terminus was relocated north of Beltsville after a series of county highways were upgraded and brought into the state highway system in the 2000s and early 2010s; the old highway through Beltsville to MD 201 became MD 212A.

Route description[edit]

View west along MD 212 near US 1 in Beltsville

MD 212 begins at the District of Columbia boundary at Eastern Avenue in Chillum. Riggs Road continues into Washington as a four-lane undivided highway to its southern end at North Capitol Street and Missouri Avenue. MD 212 heads northeast along Riggs Road, which is a four-lane divided highway with bike and parking lanes. A short distance north of Eastern Avenue, the highway intersects Chillum Road, which heads east as MD 501. MD 212 expands to six lanes at its intersection with Sargent Road, then crosses Sligo Creek and intersects the Sligo Creek Trail shortly before its intersection with MD 410 (East–West Highway). The highway continues north into Langley Park and intersects MD 193 (University Boulevard). North of MD 193, MD 212 veers northeast and drops to two lanes.[1][2]

MD 212 crosses the Northwest Branch of the Anacostia River at the site of the historic Adelphi Mill. The highway intersects Metzerott Road and Adelphi Road and follows the edge of George Washington Cemetery as it passes through the community of Adelphi. MD 212 crosses over I-495 (Capital Beltway) with no access and completes its Rigg Road section at Powder Mill Road in Hillandale. This intersection is located just east of the Prince George's–Montgomery county line; Powder Mill Road continues west as a county highway into the latter county. MD 212 continues northeast along Powder Mill Road, which passes the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and crosses Paint Branch.[1][2]

MD 212 expands to four lanes south of its intersection with Cherry Hill Road in Calverton. The highway passes northwest of High Point High School before it becomes divided at Beltsville Drive just west of its cloverleaf interchange with I-95, within which it crosses Little Paint Branch. MD 212 temporarily expands to six lanes on either side of its intersection with Old Gunpowder Road and county-maintained Powder Mill Road on the western edge of Beltsville. A short distance southeast of the intersection, Powder Mill Road again becomes state maintained as MD 212A, which passes through the center of Beltsville. MD 212 continues east as a four-lane divided highway along Ammendale Road. Just east of Indian Creek, Ammendale Road turns south from the route toward the historic Ammendale Normal Institute; the state route continues along Virginia Manor Road, which expands to six lanes as it enters an office park. When Virginia Manor Road itself splits to the northeast as MD 206, MD 212 continues southeast along Ritz Way to its eastern terminus at US 1 just west of CSX's Capital Subdivision rail line north of Beltsville.[1][2]

History[edit]

The first segment of modern MD 212 to be built as a modern road was Riggs Road from Washington to the Adelphi Mill, which was then known as the Riggs Mill. The 14-foot-wide (4.3 m) macadam road was built in two sections, the first one from Ager Road near the modern MD 410 intersection to Northwest Branch opposite the Riggs Mill by 1910.[3][4] The second segment was completed from Ager Road to the District of Columbia in 1911.[4][5] A third section of the road was built as a 14-foot-wide (4.3 m) concrete road from the south side of Northwest Branch to Metzerott Road in Adelphi between 1916 and 1919.[6][7] Another section of concrete road was added to MD 212 from Metzerott Road to the north end of George Washington Cemetery in 1929 and 1930.[8][9] The state highway was extended to Powder Mill Road by 1933.[10] MD 212 was extended northeast along Powder Mill Road to between Paint Branch in 1933 and 1934.[11][12][13]

Maryland Route 433
Location Beltsville
Existed 1930–c. 1946

The portion of MD 212 through Beltsville was constructed as MD 433.[14] The highway was built as a macadam road from US 1 southeast to the entrance to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Beltsville Agricultural Research Center at what is now MD 201 and as a concrete road from US 1 northwest to Old Gunpowder Road between 1930 and 1933.[8][10] The highway followed a straight path, using what are today Cook Road and Prince Georges Avenue east and west of its at-grade Baltimore & Ohio Railroad crossing, respectively.[14][15] The highway's bridge across the railroad in Beltsville was completed in 1937.[16] The approach roads to the railroad crossing, which were surfaced with 22-foot-wide (6.7 m) concrete, were completed in 1939.[17][18] The gap in Powder Mill Road between Paint Branch and Old Gunpowder Road was filled in 1942, including a bridge across Little Paint Branch. In addition, the highway from US 1 to Old Gunpowder Road was widened with a pair of 3-foot-wide (0.91 m) shoulders.[19] MD 212 was extended east to its present terminus by 1946.[20]

MD 212 was widened to 24 feet (7.3 m) from the District of Columbia to Northwest Branch between 1950 and 1952.[21][22] This stretch was expanded to a multi-lane divided highway from Washington to MD 193 between 1961 and 1963.[23][24] MD 212 was also expanded to a divided highway from Beltsville Drive to Old Gunpowder Road when the I-95 interchange was built in 1971.[25][26] The project to relocate MD 212 east of I-95 started with the expansion of the two-lane county highways to which the state highway would shift. The first portion of the project, along Ritz Way and the portion of Virginia Manor Road through the office park, was completed by 2003.[27] The second section, from the office park to west of the Ammendale Road–Virginia Manor Road intersection, was expanded in 2003. In 2007, the Maryland State Highway Administration temporarily transferred ownership of Powder Mill Road on either side of the Old Gunpowder Road intersection to Prince George's County, resulting in the designation of MD 212A for Powder Mill Road from southeast of the intersection to MD 201.[28] In 2012, the relocated portion of Powder Mill Road and the expanded Ammendale Road, Virginia Manor Road, and Ritz Way were marked as an extension of MD 212 to US 1.[29]

Junction list[edit]

The entire route is in Prince George's County.

Location mi
[1]
km Destinations Notes
Chillum 0.00 0.00 Riggs Road south / Eastern Avenue – Washington Southern terminus; District of Columbia boundary
0.18 0.29 MD 501 east (Chillum Road) – Hyattsville
1.26 2.03 MD 410 (East–West Highway) – Takoma Park, Hyattsville
Langley Park 2.09 3.36 MD 193 (University Boulevard) – College Park, Silver Spring
Calverton 6.87 11.06 Cherry Hill Road
Beltsville 8.08 13.00 I-95 – Baltimore, Washington I-95 Exit 29
8.54 13.74 Old Gunpowder Road north / Powder Mill Road east Powder Mill Road leads to MD 212A; MD 212 continues along Ammendale Road
10.23 16.46 MD 206 north (Virginia Manor Road)
10.43 16.79 US 1 (Baltimore Avenue) – Laurel, College Park Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Auxiliary route[edit]

MD 212A is the designation for the 1.95-mile (3.14 km) portion of Powder Mill Road that passes through Beltsville. The highway begins as a four-lane divided highway at a three-way junction of roads named Powder Mill Road. The north leg of the intersection heads north to the intersection of Powder Mill Road, Ammendale Road, and Old Gunpowder Road; the former two roads form the main line of MD 212. The west leg of the intersection is a two-lane road that provides access to a residential subdivision. MD 212A reduces to a two-lane road as it heads southeast through Beltsville. The highway intersects Rhode Island Avenue, then veers east and intersects US 1 (Baltimore Avenue). MD 212A crosses over CSX's Capital Subdivision and meets the northern end of MD 694 (Agricultural Farm Road) opposite Cook Road. The highway veers southeast and crosses Indian Creek before reaching its eastern terminus at Edmonston Road. Edmonston Road heads south as MD 201 toward Greenbelt. Powder Mill Road continues east as a federally maintained highway through the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center.[1][30] MD 212A was part of the main line of MD 212 until 2007, when the route designation was split by a transfer of the highway around the Gunpowder Road intersection to county maintenance; the eastern segment through Beltsville became MD 212A.[28]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2013). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved 2011-11-15. 
  2. ^ a b c Google (2013-06-01). "Maryland Route 212" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 2013-06-01. 
  3. ^ Maryland Geological Survey (1910). Map of Maryland (Map). Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey. 
  4. ^ a b Weller, O.E.; Parran, Thomas; Miller, W.B.; Perry, John M.; Ramsay, Andrew; Smith, J. Frank (May 1916). Annual Reports of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1912–1915 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. pp. 124, 128. Retrieved 2013-06-01. 
  5. ^ Maryland Geological Survey (1911). Map of Maryland: Showing State Road System and State Aid Roads Completed or Under Construction December 31, 1911 (Map). Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey. 
  6. ^ Zouck, Frank H.; Uhl, G. Clinton; Mudd, John F. (January 1920). Annual Reports of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1916–1919 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 31. Retrieved 2013-06-01. 
  7. ^ Maryland Geological Survey (1921). Map of Maryland: Showing State Road System and State Aid Roads (Map). Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey. 
  8. ^ a b Uhl, G. Clinton; Bruce, Howard; Shaw, John K. (October 1, 1930). Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1927–1930 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 222. Retrieved 2013-06-01. 
  9. ^ Maryland Geological Survey (1930). Map of Maryland Showing State Road System: State Aid Roads and Improved County Road Connections (Map). Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey. 
  10. ^ a b Maryland Geological Survey (1933). Map of Maryland Showing State Road System: State Aid Roads and Improved County Road Connections (Map). Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey. 
  11. ^ Maryland Geological Survey (1935). Map of Maryland Showing State Road System: State Aid Roads and Improved County Road Connections (Map). Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey. 
  12. ^ Byron, William D.; Lacy, Robert (December 28, 1934). Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1931–1934 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 349. Retrieved 2013-06-01. 
  13. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 100000160041010". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. 
  14. ^ a b Maryland State Roads Commission (1940). Map of Maryland Showing Highways and Points of Interest (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. 
  15. ^ Beltsville, MD quadrangle (Map) (1945 ed.). 1:31,680. 7 1/2 Minute Series (Topographic). United States Geological Survey. 
  16. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 100000160039010". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. 
  17. ^ Beall, J. Glenn; Jarboe, Elmer R.; Obrecht, George F., Sr. (March 4, 1939). Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1937–1938 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 147. Retrieved 2013-06-01. 
  18. ^ Whitman, Ezra B.; Webb, P. Watson; Thomas, W. Frank (March 15, 1941). Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1939–1940 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 111. Retrieved 2013-06-01. 
  19. ^ Whitman, Ezra B.; Webb, P. Watson; Thomas, W. Frank (March 15, 1943). Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1941–1942 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. pp. 57, 95. Retrieved 2013-06-01. 
  20. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission (1946). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map) (1946–1947 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. 
  21. ^ Reindollar, Robert M.; George, Joseph M.; McCain, Russell H. (December 20, 1950). Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1949–1950 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 37. Retrieved 2013-06-01. 
  22. ^ McCain, Russell H.; Hall, Avery W.; Nichols, David M. (December 15, 1952). Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1951–1952 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 90. Retrieved 2013-06-01. 
  23. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 100000160043010". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. 
  24. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission (1963). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. 
  25. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission (1971). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. 
  26. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 100000160205010". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. 
  27. ^ Maryland State Highway Administration (2003). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map) (2003–2004 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. 
  28. ^ a b Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2007). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved 2013-05-30. 
  29. ^ Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2011). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved 2013-05-30. 
  30. ^ Google (2013-06-01). "Maryland Route 212A" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 2013-06-01. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Google

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