MLB 09: The Show

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
MLB 09: The Show
MLB 09: The Show
Cover art featuring Dustin Pedroia
Developer(s)SCE San Diego Studio
Publisher(s)Sony Computer Entertainment
SeriesMLB: The Show
EngineMLB 07/ San Fran Studios (PS3) San Diego Studios Engine (PSP) MLB 06 (PS2)
Platform(s)PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3, PlayStation Portable[1]
Release
Genre(s)Sports
Mode(s)Single-player, Multiplayer, Online: Ethernet Broadband required

MLB 09: The Show is a baseball simulation video game developed by SCE San Diego Studio and published by Sony Computer Entertainment for the PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3, and PlayStation Portable systems.[1] It belongs to the Major League Baseball game series on the PlayStation systems. MLB 09: The Show is the fourth edition of the MLB: The Show series.[1]

Gameplay[edit]

New Yankee Stadium as it appears in-game.

MLB 09: The Show improves and adds many features to the previous 08 edition.[3] The franchise and career modes are improved with Road to the Show 3.0, which updated the popular mode with an all-new steal and lead-off system, and more interaction with the player's coaches; Franchise 2.0 adds several new features to its career mode including salary arbitration, waiver transactions, September call-ups, and the 40-man roster. Also receiving an update is the game's online league play, including flex scheduling to allow players to play out-of-order games, and Roster Vault option to allow gamers to create their own custom rosters and upload them online for other gamers to use. The game also allows players to store their favorite songs to their PlayStation 3 and assign them to be played at various points in the game. Players may also create custom chants.[3]

Among the in-game improvements include "Hotshot Fielding", which allows more dynamic fielder reactions and animations, as well as improved bare-handed flips, "Progressive Batting Performance", in which player abilities improve or regress depending on how the gamer plays. With "Multi-Branch Fielding", players can now take full control of fielders and break out of any animation in the process, while "Adaptive Pitching Intelligence" (API) allow catchers to call the game based on individual strengths and weaknesses of each pitcher and analyze tendencies of batters. The game also accurately graphically reflects the pitch being thrown on the pitcher's hand, and includes 18 different pitch types including six fastball variations (four-seamer, two-seamer, running fastball, cutter, splitter, sinker), five breaking pitches (10-4 curve, 12-6 curve, slider, slurve, screwball), four change-ups (straight, circle change-up, palmball, forkball), and three specialty pitches (knuckle, knuckle-curve, and the vulcan changeup). The "Pitch Command System" (PCS) affects a pitcher's ability to throw a specific pitch change depending on how often the pitcher throws it. Umpire personalities have been tweaked further as well.[3]

The game also features pitch analysis, a breakdown of all the pitches thrown during the current game being played, which allows gamers to be able to sort a pitcher by LHB or RHB, pitch type and result. This feature is also available for batters, and the batter analysis allowed for a breakdown of how a batter had performed based on LHP or RHP, Pitch Type, and result. SportsConnect Online User Tracking (SCOUT) allows gamers to set their game preferences, store them on the server, and then allow the system to look for a Quick Match with an opponent that fits their criteria.[3]

The game also features live MLB updates in-game, as well as SportsConnect Headline News.[3] In addition, SportsConnect provides weekly roster updates that can be downloaded onto the console.

Cover athlete[edit]

The cover athlete of MLB 09: The Show is the Boston Red Sox's second baseman Dustin Pedroia, who was the American League MVP of the 2008 regular season. He made appearances in several Dear PlayStation commercials with Kevin Butler debating whether he could hit a pitch.

Reception[edit]

Reception
Review scores
PublicationScore
PS2PS3PSP
1UP.comN/AA[4]N/A
DestructoidN/A9/10[5]N/A
Game InformerN/A9/10[6]N/A
GameProN/AN/A5/5 stars[7]
GameSpotN/A9/10[8]N/A
GameSpyN/A4/5 stars[9]N/A
GameTrailersN/A8.8/10[10]N/A
GameZone8.7/10[11]8.7/10[12]7/10[13]
IGN7.3/10[14]8.7/10[15]7.5/10[16]
OPM (UK)N/A10/10[17]7/10[18]
411ManiaN/A9.2/10[19]N/A
Aggregate score
Metacritic79/100[20]90/100[21]78/100[22]

The PlayStation 3 version of MLB 09 The Show received "universal acclaim", while the PlayStation 2 and PSP versions received "generally favorable reviews", according to the review aggregation website Metacritic.[20][21][22]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "MLB 09 The Show(TM) Announced for PlayStation(R) 3, PSP(R) (PlayStation(R) Portable), and PlayStation(R) 2". SCEA. PR Newswire. December 22, 2008. Archived from the original on May 30, 2009. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  2. ^ Jeff Haynes (January 13, 2009). "MLB '09 Details Emerge". IGN. IGN Entertainment. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d e Jon Robinson (December 19, 2008). "MLB 09 The Show: Exclusive first look". ESPN. Archived from the original on December 21, 2008. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  4. ^ Mike Nelson (March 16, 2009). "MLB 09 The Show (PS3)". 1UP.com. Archived from the original on March 17, 2009. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  5. ^ Samit Sarkar (March 24, 2009). "Destructoid review: MLB 09 The Show (PS3)". Destructoid. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  6. ^ Andrew Reiner (April 2009). "MLB 09: The Show (PS3): The Little Details That Count". Game Informer. No. 192. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  7. ^ George Jones (April 6, 2009). "MLB 09: The Show (PSP)". GamePro. Archived from the original on April 9, 2009. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  8. ^ Brett Todd (March 10, 2009). "MLB 09: The Show Review (PS3)". GameSpot. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  9. ^ Steve Berman (March 18, 2009). "GameSpy: MLB 09: The Show (PS3)". GameSpy. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  10. ^ yekcir54321 (March 13, 2009). "MLB 09 The Show: Review (PS3)". GameTrailers (YouTube). Archived from the original on March 19, 2009. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  11. ^ Heath Hooker (March 9, 2009). "MLB 09: The Show - PS2 - Review". GameZone. Archived from the original on March 12, 2009. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  12. ^ Michael Lafferty (March 1, 2009). "MLB 09: The Show - PS3 - Review". GameZone. Archived from the original on March 6, 2009. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  13. ^ Dakota Grabowski (March 11, 2009). "MLB 09: The Show - PSP - Review". GameZone. Archived from the original on April 21, 2009. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  14. ^ Jeff Haynes (March 6, 2009). "MLB 09: The Show Review (PS2)". IGN. IGN Entertainment. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  15. ^ Jeff Haynes (March 3, 2009). "MLB 09: The Show Review (PS3)". IGN. IGN Entertainment. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  16. ^ Jeff Haynes (March 9, 2009). "MLB 09: The Show Review (PSP)". IGN. IGN Entertainment. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  17. ^ "MLB 09: The Show (PS3)". PlayStation Official Magazine – UK. May 2009. p. 106.
  18. ^ "MLB 09: The Show (PSP)". PlayStation Official Magazine – UK. September 2009. p. 112.
  19. ^ Armando Rodriguez (March 31, 2009). "MLB 09: The Show (PS3) Review". 411Mania. Archived from the original on April 4, 2009. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  20. ^ a b "MLB 09: The Show for PlayStation 2 Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  21. ^ a b "MLB 09: The Show for PlayStation 3 Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  22. ^ a b "MLB 09: The Show for PSP Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved November 8, 2017.

External links[edit]