MV Aureol

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MV Aureol
MV Aureol
History
United Kingdom
Name: MV Aureol
Owner: Elder Dempster Lines Ltd.
Port of registry: Liverpool,  UK
Route: Liverpool-Las Palmas-Bathurst(Banjul)-Freetown-Monrovia-Tema-Apapa. From 1972-74 UK departure port Southampton.
Builder: Alexander Stephen and Sons, Govan
Yard number: 629[1]
Launched: 28 March 1951
Completed: October 1951
Maiden voyage: 3 November 1951
Out of service: 18 October 1974
Identification: IMO number: 5030878[2]
Fate: Sold, November 1974
Panama
Name: M/V Marianna VI
Owner: Yiannis Latsis
Port of registry: Panama  Panama
Acquired: November 1974
Fate:
  • Laid up, February 1979
  • Scrapped, Alang, India, 2001
General characteristics [3]
Type: Passenger/cargo ocean liner
Tonnage:
Length: 537 ft (164 m)
Beam: 70 ft (21 m)
Draught: 25 ft (7.6 m)[1]
Installed power: 10,800bhp[4]
Propulsion: 2 × 4-cylinder Doxford diesel engines, 2 shafts[1]
Speed: 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph)
Capacity:
  • 329 passengers:
  • 253 first class
  • 76 cabin class
Crew: 145

MV Aureol was a mid-sized British ocean liner, originally put into service for Elder Dempster Lines of Liverpool in 1951. She was constructed on the River Clyde in Glasgow by Alexander Stephen and Sons. At 537 feet long and measuring 14,083 gross register tons, Aureol had room for 329 passengers and carried 145 crew.[3] She spent her entire Elder Dempster career on the UK-Lagos passenger cargo service. From 1951 to 1972 she sailed from Liverpool, but closure of the landing stage and the hope of better loadings led to her being transferred to Southampton (first departure Apr 26 1972) for the last 2 years of her service.

Aureol arrived at Southampton at the end of her final Elder Dempster voyage on October 18th 1974. She was purchased by Greek oil tycoon Yiannis Latsis, and renamed Marianna VI after one of his daughters. In 1989 she was laid up at Eleusina and did not sail again until 2001, when she moved to the Indian port of Alang to be beached and broken up for scrap.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Aureol". Clyde-built Ship Database. 2012. Retrieved 1 October 2012. 
  2. ^ "Aureol". shipspotting.com. 2012. Retrieved 1 October 2012. 
  3. ^ a b "Aureol Statistics". oceanlinermuseum.co.uk. 2006. Retrieved 1 October 2012. 
  4. ^ Kludas, Great Passenger Ships of the World Vol.5
  5. ^ "MV Aureol". midshipcentury.com. 2012. Retrieved 1 October 2012.