Mabini, Batangas

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Mabini
Municipality
Mabini,Batangasjf8785 05.JPG
Official seal of Mabini
Seal
Nickname(s): Diving Capital of the Philippines
Map of Batangas showing the location of Mabini
Location within Batangas province
Mabini is located in Philippines
Mabini
Mabini
Location within the Philippines
Coordinates: 13°43′N 120°54′E / 13.72°N 120.9°E / 13.72; 120.9Coordinates: 13°43′N 120°54′E / 13.72°N 120.9°E / 13.72; 120.9
Country Philippines
Region Calabarzon (Region IV-A)
Province Batangas
District 2nd District
Founded 1923
Barangays 34 (see Barangays)
Government[1]
 • Type Sangguniang Bayan
 • Mayor Nilo M. Villanueva
 • Vice Mayor Elmar A. Panopio
 • Councilors
Area[2]
 • Total 44.47 km2 (17.17 sq mi)
Population (2015 census)[3]
 • Total 46,211
 • Density 1,000/km2 (2,700/sq mi)
 • Voter(2016)[4] 28,259
Time zone PST (UTC+8)
ZIP code 4202
IDD:area code +63 (0)43
Income class 1st class
PSGC 041016000
Website www.mabini.gov.ph

Mabini, officially the Municipality of Mabini (Filipino: Bayan ng Mabini), is a municipality in the province of Batangas in the Calabarzon (Region IV-A) of the Philippines. The population was 46,211 at the 2015 census.[3] In the 2016 electoral roll, it had 28,259 registered voters.[4]

Mabini is known for its diving and snorkeling sites. It is named after Apolinario Mabini, a Filipino revolutionary hero.

History[edit]

Legend states that the first Malay settlers to inhabit the vast fertile land bordering the two bodies of water now known as the Batangas Bay and the Balayan Bay, first found anchor along the shores of the land protruding down Southwest ward known geographically as the Calumpan Peninsula.

These Malay settlers found the land fertile and agriculturally appropriate and the sea rich in marine resources. They established their settlement in this once vast unknown land. As more Malay settlers arrived from distant lands, more settlements were founded until even the upland regions of the peninsula were settled. The inhabitants had their own form of village government. They were ruled by a headman, a datu, or a sultan, in case of big encampments. Malay civilization began to take roots. Rapid increase of population brought about the settlements of all the neighboring regions, that it did not take long before several nearby regions were inhabited later on to comprise the whole province of Kumintang, better known later as Batangas.

During the Spanish colonial rule, the Calumpan Peninsula was made a part of the pueblo of Bauan, in the province of Kumintang. The same peninsula territory of Bauan was subdivided into barrios: Mainaga, Pulong-Niogan, Pulong-Balibaguhan, Anilao, Solo, Pulong-Anahao, Bagalangit, Nag-Iba, Malimatoc, Saguing and Talaga. For more than three hundred years, while the Archipelago was under Spanish domination, the peninsula remained a part of the “pueblo” of Bauan even until the early part of the American occupation. The people of this peninsula, like other people of other regions, suffered untold hardships under the Spanish rule. The yoke of the Spanish tyranny was thrown off after the gallant uprising of 1896. The revolution emancipated the people from the tyrants of Spain. Foremost of the heroic young men was Don Francisco Castillo, known as Apian Kiko, who led the fight for freedom in this peninsula.

After efforts had been exerted by the proponents of establishing a new municipality independent of the town of Bauan, eleven (11) barrios of the Calumpan Peninsula and the whole of the Maricaban Island was declared an independent municipality, with the name Mabini, derived from the Philippine hero Apolinario Mabini. The new-born municipality of Mabini was inaugurated on January 1, 1918, with Captain Francisco Castillo, known as the founder of the town, as the first appointive Municipal President.

Geography[edit]

Mabini is located at 13°43′N 120°54′E / 13.72°N 120.9°E / 13.72; 120.9.

According to the Philippine Statistics Authority, the municipality has a land area of 44.47 square kilometres (17.17 sq mi)[2] constituting 1.43% of the 3,119.75-square-kilometre- (1,204.54 sq mi) total area of Batangas.

Barangays[edit]

Mabini is politically subdivided into 34 barangays.[5] Barangay San Juan was formerly the sitios of Nag-ilong and Lugay in the barrio of Mainaga, constituted into a separate and independent barangay through Republic Act No. 212, approved June 1, 1948.[6]

PSGC Barangay Population ±% p.a.
2015[3] 2010[7]
041016001 Anilao Proper 1.4% 650 611 1.19%
041016002 Anilao East 3.5% 1,626 1,566 0.72%
041016003 Bagalangit 5.3% 2,458 2,613 −1.16%
041016004 Bulacan 2.9% 1,351 1,281 1.02%
041016005 Calamias 2.4% 1,123 1,023 1.79%
041016006 Estrella 1.5% 716 631 2.44%
041016007 Gasang 5.3% 2,455 2,349 0.84%
041016008 Laurel 2.6% 1,220 1,183 0.59%
041016009 Ligaya 1.9% 889 1,205 −5.63%
041016010 Mainaga 4.2% 1,951 1,735 2.26%
041016011 Mainit 2.3% 1,076 1,050 0.47%
041016012 Majuben 1.6% 725 640 2.40%
041016014 Malimatoc I 2.1% 955 938 0.34%
041016015 Malimatoc II 2.2% 999 1,141 −2.50%
041016016 Nag‑Iba 1.9% 886 904 −0.38%
041016017 Pilahan 1.7% 765 643 3.36%
041016018 Poblacion 4.1% 1,911 1,472 5.10%
041016019 Pulang Lupa 2.1% 969 1,220 −4.29%
041016020 Pulong Anahao 2.7% 1,227 1,200 0.42%
041016021 Pulong Balibaguhan 2.0% 940 887 1.11%
041016022 Pulong Niogan 3.8% 1,755 1,268 6.38%
041016023 Saguing 2.8% 1,302 1,313 −0.16%
041016024 Sampaguita 3.5% 1,621 1,550 0.86%
041016025 San Francisco 4.4% 2,052 1,762 2.94%
041016026 San Jose 1.9% 876 865 0.24%
041016027 San Juan 4.6% 2,124 1,975 1.39%
041016028 San Teodoro 4.1% 1,913 1,783 1.35%
041016029 Santa Ana 1.3% 585 712 −3.67%
041016030 Santa Mesa 2.4% 1,126 1,193 −1.09%
041016031 Santo Niño 1.5% 678 531 4.76%
041016032 Santo Tomas 2.6% 1,210 1,136 1.21%
041016033 Solo 5.9% 2,725 2,756 −0.22%
041016034 Talaga Proper 3.5% 1,636 1,571 0.77%
041016035 Talaga East 3.7% 1,716 1,684 0.36%
Total 46,211 44,391 0.77%

Demographics[edit]

Population census of Mabini
Year Pop. ±% p.a.
1918 11,925 —    
1939 10,259 −0.71%
1948 11,850 +1.61%
1960 15,548 +2.29%
1970 19,522 +2.30%
1975 21,694 +2.14%
1980 23,637 +1.73%
1990 30,474 +2.57%
1995 33,499 +1.79%
2000 37,474 +2.43%
2007 40,629 +1.12%
2010 44,391 +3.28%
2015 46,211 +0.77%
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority[3][7][8][9]


In the 2015 census, Mabini had a population of 46,211.[3] The population density was 1,000 inhabitants per square kilometre (2,600/sq mi).

In the 2016 electoral roll, it had 28,259 registered voters.[4]

Transportation[edit]

Jeepneys and tricycles are the main means of transportation around the town. Currently, there are two piers that serve the area: Anilao Pier and Talaga Pier, mainly catering for motor bancas going to and from the nearby island-town of Tingloy.

Mabini General Hospital

To get to Mabini from Manila take a bus destined for Batangas Pier and get off at Batangas Grand Terminal from there there are jeepneys to Mabini. If heading to Anilao get off at Mabini Crossroads and then take a tricycle Tripadvisor Forum

Health[edit]

  • Mabini General Hospital
  • Zigzag Hospital

Education[edit]

Mabini College of Batangas
College
  • Mabini College of Batangas
High school
  • Anselmo A. Sandoval Memorial National High School
  • Mabini College of Batangas
  • Saint Francis Academy
  • Mabini National High School
  • Apolinario National High School
Elementary/Pre-elementary

Attractions[edit]

Sunset in Anilao
  • Anilao – popular with budget divers and snorkelers. There are several diving centers where trips can be arranged to diving spots in Balayan Bay near Cape Bagalangit and near Sombrero and Maricaban Islands. Snorkeling is available off Maricaban's Cemetery Beach, Red Palm Beach, and around Sepok Point. Although the beach at Anilao is not recommended for swimming, thatched bamboo rafts can be rented with tables and benches at the Anilao Beach Resort and other resorts.
  • Mainaga – the business area of Mabini. During the Spanish time, it was called may narra" which was changed to Mainaga. It is home to companies like Suntrak Corp., CKU Steel Corp., PNOC, and Petron, with some shops like Chechu Mart, PRAB Foodhaus, and Mainaga Multipurpose Cooperative Mart, catering grocery items.
  • Mount Gulugod-Baboy – "Gulugod-Baboy" is the general term that describes the hills traversing Calumpang Peninsula. It has three peaks: Gulugod Baboy, Pinagbanderahan, and Tore, accessible through several passages: Anilao, Panay, Bagalangit, Ligaya, Laurel and Malimatoc I. It is 525 metres (1,722 ft) above sea level. At its peak, one can see, from east to west: Janao Bay, Maricaban Strait which bears Sombrero and Maricaban Islands, a distant, faint blue Mindoro, Verde Island (SW) and Batangas Bay. The city and port of Batangas is visible on the west, following a farther Mount Daguldul. To the north is Mount Maculot, and even Mount Batulao and the Tagaytay highlands. It is popular among hikers during the Holy Week.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Municipality". Quezon City, Philippines: Department of the Interior and Local Government. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "Province: Batangas". PSGC Interactive. Quezon City, Philippines: Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved 12 November 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Census of Population (2015). "Region IV-A (Calabarzon)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. PSA. Retrieved 20 June 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c "2016 National and Local Elections Statistics". Commission on Elections. 2016. 
  5. ^ "Municipal: Mabini, Batangas". PSGC Interactive. Quezon City, Philippines: Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved 8 January 2016. 
  6. ^ "An act creating the barrio of San Juan in the municipality of Mabini, province of Batangas". LawPH.com. Retrieved 2011-04-08. 
  7. ^ a b Census of Population and Housing (2010). "Region IV-A (Calabarzon)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. NSO. Retrieved 29 June 2016. 
  8. ^ Census of Population (1995, 2000 and 2007). "Region IV-A (Calabarzon)". Total Population by Province, City and Municipality. NSO. Archived from the original on 24 June 2011. 
  9. ^ "Province of Batangas". Municipality Population Data. Local Water Utilities Administration Research Division. Retrieved 17 December 2016. 

External links[edit]