Macchi M.C.100

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Macchi M.C.100
Idrovoante civile Macchi.jpg
Role Passenger flying boat
Manufacturer Macchi
Designer Mario Castoldi
First flight 1939
Primary user Ala Littoria
Number built 3

The Macchi M.C.100 was an Italian commercial flying boat designed and built by Macchi.

Design and development[edit]

The M.C.100 was a shoulder-wing cantilever monoplane flying boat, with a family resemblance to the military twin-engine M.C.99 and earlier M.C.94. It was powered by three Alfa Romeo 126 RC 10 radial engines strut-mounted above the wing, each driving a three-bladed tractor propeller. The pilot and co-pilot sat side by side in a raised and enclosed control cabin forward of the wing, while the radio operator sat in the aircraft's nose. A main cabin in the hull had accommodation for 26 passengers. The prototype first flew on 7 January 1939.[1] The prototype was followed by two more aircraft, and all three were in service by June 1940 with Ala Littoria operating between Rome-Algiers-Barcelona. With the start of World War II, the aircraft was used for liaison and communication duties, and to maintain a daily Rome-Marsala-Tripoli service.

Operators[edit]

 Kingdom of Italy

Specifications (M.C.100)[edit]

Data from Wings of Peace: Macchi C.94 and C.100[1]

General characteristics

  • Crew: three
  • Capacity: 26 passengers
  • Length: 17.40 m (57 ft 1 in)
  • Wingspan: 24.35 m (79 ft 10¼ in)
  • Wing area: 100 m2 (1,076 ft2)
  • Empty weight: 8,568 kg (18,849 lb)
  • Gross weight: 13,130 kg (28,880 lb)
  • Powerplant: 3 × Alfa Romeo 126 RC 10 radial engine, 597 kW (800 hp) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 310 km/h (193 mph)
  • Cruising speed: 262 km/h (163 mph)
  • Range: 1,400 km (869 miles)
  • Service ceiling: 6,102 m (20,013 ft)

See also[edit]

Related lists

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Stroud 1989, p. 308.
  • Stroud, John (May 1989). "Wings of Peace: Macchi C.94 and C.100". Aeroplane Monthly. pp. 304–308. 
  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. 
  • The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing. p. 2398.