Macedonian Greek Catholic Church

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Macedonian Byzantine Catholic Church
Classification Catholic
Orientation Eastern Catholic, Byzantine Rite
Polity Episcopal
Structure Apostolic Exarchate[gci 1]
Leader Bishop Kiro Stojanov[gci 2]
Region Macedonia
Headquarters Assumption of Mary Cathedral, Strumica, Macedonia
Founder John Paul II
Origin 2001
Separated from Byzantines of Križevci
Branched from Catholic
Congregations 7
Members 15,037
Ministers 11[cnewa 1]
Other name(s) Apostolic Exarchate of Macedonia[gci 1]

The Macedonian Byzantine Catholic Church is a Byzantine Rite sui juris Eastern Catholic Church in full union with the Roman Catholic Church which uses the Macedonian language in the liturgy.

The Macedonian Church consists of a single Apostolic Exarchate.[gci 1]

History[edit]

An Apostolic Exarch was appointed for Macedonia as early as 1883 until 1922/1924[gci 2][cha 1] as part of the Bulgarian Greek Catholic Church.[1] After the end of World War I and the foundation of Yugoslavia, the Exarchate was absorbed into the Eparchy of Križevci.

In January 2001, a separate Byzantine Catholic Apostolic Exarchate of Macedonia was formed for Eastern Catholics of the Byzantine Rite in Macedonia. It was fully separated from Eparchy of Križevci and proclaimed as directly subjected only to the Holy See.[2] On the same day (11 January 2001) the Holy See appointed the Latin Bishop of Skopje as the first Apostolic Exarch of Macedonia. [3]

Statistics[edit]

As of 2010, the Church's membership was estimated at approximately 15,037 faithful, with one bishop, 7 parishes, 11 priests, and 18 religious sisters.[cnewa 1]

Year Members Priests Parishes
2000 10,000 10 8
2001 6,320 9 5
2002 11,000 8 5
2003 11,367 8 5[cha 1]
2004 11,367[cnewa 2] 9 5[cha 1]
2005 11,398 9 5[cnewa 2]
2006 11,483 8 5[cnewa 3]
2007 11,491 8 5[cnewa 4]
2008 15,175 10 6[cnewa 5]
2009 15,041 11 7[cnewa 6]
2010 15,037 11 7[cnewa 1]

Exarch[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Кратка история на Католическата апостолическа екзархия. (In English: A conscise history of the Catholic Apostolic Exarchate - retrieved from the official website of the Bulgarian Greek Catholic Church on January 16, 2012.)
  2. ^ Acta Apostolicae Sedis, 93 (2001), p. 339.
  3. ^ Acta Apostolicae Sedis, 94 (2002), p. 152.
  1. ^ a b c d Cheney, David M. "Apostolic Exarchate of Macedonia". All Dioceses. catholic-hierarchy.org. Retrieved 10 January 2012. 
  1. ^ a b c Ronald Roberson. "The Eastern Catholic Churches 2010 Statistics" (PDF). Catholic Near East Welfare Association. Retrieved September 2010.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  2. ^ a b Ronald Roberson. "The Eastern Catholic Churches 2005 Statistics" (PDF). Catholic Near East Welfare Association. Retrieved 11 January 2012. 
  3. ^ Ronald Roberson. "The Eastern Catholic Churches 2006 Statistics" (PDF). Catholic Near East Welfare Association. Retrieved 11 January 2012. 
  4. ^ Ronald Roberson. "The Eastern Catholic Churches 2007 Statistics" (PDF). Catholic Near East Welfare Association. Retrieved 11 January 2012. 
  5. ^ Ronald Roberson. "The Eastern Catholic Churches 2008 Statistics" (PDF). Catholic Near East Welfare Association. Retrieved 11 January 2012. 
  6. ^ Ronald Roberson. "The Eastern Catholic Churches 2009 Statistics" (PDF). Catholic Near East Welfare Association. Retrieved 11 January 2012. 
  1. ^ a b c "Macedonian Church". Catholic Dioceses in the World. GCatholic. Retrieved 11 January 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c "Apostolic Exarchate of Macedonia". Catholic Dioceses in the World. GCatholic. Retrieved 11 January 2012. 

External links[edit]