Madeleine Dubé

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Madeleine Dubé
MLA
Member of the New Brunswick Legislative Assembly
for Edmundston-Saint Basile
Edmundston (1999-2006)
Assumed office
June 7, 1999
Preceded by Bernard Valcourt
New Brunswick Minister of Education
In office
2003–2006
Preceded by Dennis Furlong
Succeeded by Claude Williams
New Brunswick Minister of Family and Community Services
In office
2006–2006
Preceded by Joan MacAlpine-Stiles
Succeeded by Carmel Robichaud
New Brunswick Minister of Health
In office
2010–2012
Preceded by Mary Schryer
Succeeded by Ted Flemming
New Brunswick Minister of Social Development
In office
2012–2014
Preceded by Sue Stultz
Succeeded by Cathy Rogers
Personal details
Political party Progressive Conservative

Madeleine "Mado" Dubé, (born September 26, 1961 in Edmundston, New Brunswick) is a New Brunswick social worker and politician.

Early life and education[edit]

Dubé has a bachelor degree in social work from l'Université de Moncton (UdeM) and worked for the New Brunswick government as a social worker prior to starting her own business focussing on human development. She also served as a part-time lecturer at the Edmundston campus of UdeM.

Political career[edit]

She was first elected to the Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick in the 1999 provincial election and was re-elected in 2003, 2006 and 2010. In her first term, she chaired the committee on health care and joined the cabinet immediately following her re-election first as Minister of Education and then, on February 14, 2006 as Minister of Family and Community Services. After her election to a third term she served in the opposition. She has been elected as Progressive Conservative Caucus chairperson in the Fall of 2007. In September 2010, she was re-elected four times in a row to the New Brunswick Legislature with one of the largest majorities.

She was re-elected in the 2014 provincial election that saw the defeat of the Progressive Conservative government and her return to the Opposition benches where she serves as Opposition House Leader.

Personal life[edit]

She is married with two children.

References[edit]