Madison Chock

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Madison Chock
2017-18 Grand Prix (France) Chock and Bates.jpg
Chock/Bates at the 2017 Internationaux de France
Personal information
Full nameMadison La'akea
Te-Lan Hall Chock
Country representedUnited States
Born (1992-07-02) July 2, 1992 (age 30)[1]
Redondo Beach, California
ResidenceMontreal, Quebec
Height1.57 m (5 ft 2 in)
PartnerEvan Bates
Former partnerGreg Zuerlein
Kurt Lingenfelter
CoachMarie-France Dubreuil, Patrice Lauzon, Romain Haguenauer
Former coachIgor Shpilband, Marina Zueva
ChoreographerMarie-France Dubreuil
Former choreographerChristopher Dean, Rohene Ward, Igor Shpilband, Marina Zueva
Skating clubAll Year FSC
Training locationsMontreal, Quebec
Former training locationsNovi, Michigan
Canton, Michigan
Began skating1997
World standingWith Bates
1 (2021–22)
5 (2020–21)
4 (2019–20)
7 (2018–19)
7 (2017–18)
1 (2016–17)
1 (2015–16)
2 (2014–15)
8 (2013–14)
14 (2012–13)
51 (2011–12)
With Zuerlein
16 (2010–11)
13 (2009–10)
17 (2008–09)
60 (2007–08)
ISU personal best scores
Combined total216.83
2022 Worlds
Short dance87.51
2022 Worlds
Free dance130.63
2022 Olympics
Medal record

Madison La'akea Te-Lan Hall Chock (born July 2, 1992) is an American ice dancer. With her skating partner, Evan Bates, she is a 2022 Olympic team event silver medalist, a three-time World medalist (silver in 2015, bronze in 2016 and 2022), a three-time Grand Prix Final silver medalist (2014–15, 2015–16, 2019–20), a two-time Four Continents champions (2019, 2020), and a three-time U.S. national champion (2015, 2020, 2022). She is a three-time Olympian, having represented the United States at the 2014, 2018, and 2022 Winter Olympics.

With former partner Greg Zuerlein, Chock is the 2009 World Junior champion, 2008 JGP Final champion, and 2011 U.S. national bronze medalist. They competed together from 2006 to 2011.

Personal life[edit]

Madison La'akea Te-Lan Hall Chock was born in Redondo Beach, California.[1] She went to Novi High School. She is of Chinese-Hawaiian descent on her father's side, and European descent on her mother's side.[2] La'akea means "sacred light from heaven" and Te-Lan (德蘭) means "virtuous orchid."[2]

After partnering on ice for a number of years, Chock and Bates began a romantic relationship in 2017.[3][4] On June 11, 2022 they became engaged.[5]

Early career[edit]

Madison Chock began skating at the age of five, having become interested after watching it on TV with her parents. Ice dancing was suggested to her at the age of 12 and she found that she enjoyed it, although she initially had no interest in dance. She also tried pair skating and took tests through the intermediate level.[2]

Chock skated for one season with Kurt Lingenfelter on the intermediate level. They won the pewter medal at the 2006 U.S. Junior Championships.[6]

First two seasons with Zuerlein[edit]

Chock teamed up with ice dancer Greg Zuerlein in June 2006.[2] They placed fifth in the novice division at the 2007 U.S. Championships. They began working with Igor Shpilband and Marina Zueva in 2007.[7]

Making their Junior Grand Prix debut, Chock/Zuerlein won gold in September 2007 in Tallinn, Estonia. With a bronze medal at their second event, in Chemnitz, Germany, they qualified to the ISU Junior Grand Prix Final in Gdańsk, Poland, where they placed fifth. They received the junior bronze medal at the 2008 U.S. Championships.

2008–2009 season: World Junior title[edit]

In December 2008, Chock/Zuerlein won gold at the Junior Grand Prix Final in Goyang, South Korea, where they finished ahead of silver medalists Hubbell/Hubbell by 6.47 points.

In January, they won the junior title at the 2009 U.S. Championships. They capped off their season by becoming World Junior champions in Sofia, Bulgaria.[8] They outscored silver medalists Shibutani/Shibutani by 10.40 points.

2009–2010 season[edit]

Chock/Zuerlein moved up to the senior level. Making their Grand Prix debut, they placed sixth at the 2009 Skate America and eighth at the 2009 Cup of China. They finished 5th in their senior national debut in January 2010. Later that month, they were sent to the 2010 Four Continents Championships in Jeonju, South Korea, where they had the same result.

2010–2011 season[edit]

Chock/Zuerlein won their first senior Grand Prix medal, bronze, at the 2010 Skate Canada International and followed it up with bronze at the 2010 Trophée Éric Bompard. They won their first senior national medal, bronze, at the 2011 U.S. Championships. After placing fifth again at Four Continents, they finished ninth in their first and only appearance at the World Championships, setting personal best scores in both segments of the competition.

On June 7, 2011, Chock and Zuerlein announced the end of their five-year partnership; Zuerlein retired from competition while Chock said that she intended to continue competing.[9]

Chock and Bates[edit]

2011–2012 season: First season with Bates[edit]

On July 1, 2011, Chock and Evan Bates announced their partnership and that they would continue to be coached by Shpilband and Zueva.[7][10] They finished fourth at the 2011 Skate Canada International, fifth at the 2011 Trophée Éric Bompard, and 5th at the 2012 U.S. Championships. After Zueva and Shpilband ended their coaching partnership, Chock/Bates were the first team to announce that they would continue training with Shpilband.[11]

2012–2013 season[edit]

Chock/Bates finished fourth at the 2012 U.S. International Classic and then won gold at the 2012 Nebelhorn Trophy.[12] They then competed at the 2012 Cup of China and finished fourth. At the 2013 U.S. Nationals, Chock/Bates were able to win the silver medal ahead of Shibutani/Shibutani. They were named in the U.S. team to the 2013 Four Continents where they won the bronze medal. At the 2013 World Championships, they finished seventh overall. Chock/Bates competed at the 2013 World Team Trophy and placed first in ice dance, helping Team USA win the team gold for the first time since 2009.

2013–2014 season: First Olympics[edit]

Chock/Bates were assigned to two Grand Prix events, the 2013 Cup of China and 2013 Rostelecom Cup, and won bronze at both. They won the silver medal at the 2014 U.S. Championships and were named in the U.S. Olympic team. They finished eighth at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia.[13]

Chock/Bates placed fourth in the short dance, fifth in the free, and fifth overall at the 2014 World Championships in Saitama, Japan.

2014–2015 season: World silver medal[edit]

Chock/Bates took silver at the 2014 Nebelhorn Trophy, an ISU Challenger Series event, and then won both their Grand Prix events at the 2014 Skate America and 2014 Rostelecom Cup. The team went on to win the silver at the Grand Prix Final in December and then their first senior national title, at the 2015 U.S. Championships in January.[14]

In February, Chock/Bates won silver at the 2015 Four Continents Championships in Seoul, where they finished second to Canada's Weaver/Poje by a margin of 1.28 points. In March, they capped off their season with silver at the 2015 World Championships in Shanghai, China. Ranked first in the short dance and second in the free, they finished with a total score 2.94 points less than the champions, Papadakis/Cizeron of France, and 1.92 more than the bronze medalists, Weaver/Poje.

2015–2016 season: World bronze medal[edit]

Chock/Bates won gold at the 2015 Nebelhorn Trophy, again an ISU Challenger Series event. At the event, they received comments that "Dark Eyes" was not suitable for a polka rhythm.[15][16] They changed the short dance music to "More" and "Unchained Melody" to clarify the rhythms,[17] and won the gold at the 2015 Skate America followed by a silver at 2015 Cup of China. They then won the silver medal at the 2015–16 Grand Prix Final in Barcelona, behind Canadians Weaver/Poje.

In March, Chock/Bates won the bronze medal at the 2016 World Championships in Boston, having finished third behind Papadakis/Cizeron and Shibutani/Shibutani in both segments.

2016–2017 season[edit]

Chock/Bates began their season with silver medals at four international events, the 2016 CS Nebelhorn Trophy, 2016 CS Ondrej Nepela Memorial, 2016 Skate Canada International, and 2016 Rostelecom Cup. In December, they placed sixth in the short dance, fourth in the free, and sixth overall at the Grand Prix Final in Marseille, France. In January, they ranked second in the short dance and first in the free dance at the 2017 U.S. Championships, losing overall to the Shibutanis by 1.01.

Chock/Bates took the bronze medal at the 2017 Four Continents Championships in Gangneung, South Korea, where they finished behind Canada's Virtue/Moir and the Shibutanis. They finished seventh overall (fourth in the short, eighth in the free) at the 2017 World Championships in Helsinki, Finland.

2017–2018 season: Second Olympics[edit]

Chock competed with an injury after bone fragments chipped off her right ankle in August 2017, just before Champs Camp.[18][19] She and Bates won silver medals at the 2017 Cup of China and 2017 Internationaux de France, which meant that they qualified to their fourth consecutive Grand Prix Final. They placed fifth in the short dance, third in the free, and fifth overall at the December event in Nagoya, Japan.

At the 2018 U.S. Championships, Chock/Bates placed third in the short dance, first in the free dance, and third overall, scoring 0.52 less than the champions, Hubbell/Donohue, and 0.33 less than the Shibutanis. They were not selected for the team competition but competed in the individual ice dancing event at the 2018 Winter Olympics, which took place in February in Gangneung, South Korea. Chock reinjured her ankle in the final moments of the warm-up before the short dance.[19] She stated that it was an "osteochondral lesion" with a loose bone fragment in her joint.[20] The duo placed seventh in the short dance. Skating their "Imagine" program in the free dance, the blades of their skates caught on the entrance of their combination spin, resulting in both falling and invalidating the entire element. They placed twelfth in the free dance, and ninth overall. Speaking afterward, Chock said that her previous injury was not responsible for the fall, and that at that moment "I knew it was over. I knew there was no shot. After working so hard all this season and going through so much and trying to stay healthy and then just losing it at a crucial moment, it was really, really heartbreaking."[21][22]

In March, they finished fifth at the 2018 World Championships in Milan, Italy. On April 6, 2018, Chock underwent surgery to remove the loose bone fragments in her right ankle.[18] In late May, Chock/Bates announced a coaching change, stating that they would begin training in the summer with Marie-France Dubreuil, Patrice Lauzon, and Romain Haguenauer in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.[23]

2018–2019 season: Four Continents gold[edit]

Chock and Bates were initially assigned to two Grand Prix events, the newly created Helsinki Grand Prix and the Rostelecom Cup. Chock's recovery from her ankle surgery necessitated their withdrawal, and they did not compete in the first half of the season.[24]

In January, they returned to competition at the Toruń Cup in Poland, winning decisively. They then competed at the 2019 U.S. Championships in Detroit, where they placed second in both programs, winning the silver medal behind Hubbell/Donohue. Both praised their new coaches and training environment afterward, with Bates saying they were "really happy with the performance here in Detroit. This self-belief is a belief in each other, our training mates, and coaches, and that is a strength that will carry us back to where we want to go." They were assigned to compete at the Four Continents and World Championships.[25]

At the Four Continents Championships, held in Anaheim, Chock/Bates placed second in the rhythm dance, again behind Hubbell/Donohue. They placed first in the free dance and first overall, following a series of errors by Hubbell/Donohue, principally their planned stationary lift being reduced to base value after traveling too much. This was the team's first gold medal at an ISU Championship, prompting Bates to observe "we got a lot of medals, none of them are gold. I am surprised. If you had told us that we would win Four Continents when we pulled out of the Grand Prix four months ago, I think we would be very surprised. But we're very happy now." Chock stated that she considered the placement secondary to "new found joy and happiness" in their skating.[26]

Chock/Bates concluded their season at the 2019 World Championships, where they finished sixth.

2019–2020 season: Second Four Continents and national titles[edit]

Beginning the season on the Challenger series, Chock/Bates won gold at the 2019 CS U.S. Classic, winning by almost 14 points over silver medalists Carreira/Ponomarenko.[27] At their second Challenger, the 2019 CS Finlandia Trophy, they won a second gold medal, despite the loss of an element in their free dance.[28]

On the Grand Prix, Chock/Bates began at the 2019 Internationaux de France, where they placed second in the rhythm dance despite hitting only one of the four keypoints in the Finnstep pattern dance.[29] Second in the free dance as well, they won the silver medal.[30] The following week at the 2019 Cup of China, they again placed second in the rhythm dance and obtained only one of the four Finnstep keypoints.[31] Chock/Bates won the free dance decisively, but remained in second place overall.[32] At the Grand Prix Final, Chock/Bates scored a season's best in the rhythm dance, placing third while obtaining three of the four Finnstep keypoints.[33] They also scored a personal best in the free dance, finishing second in the free dance and second overall, returning to the Grand Prix Final podium for the first time since 2015. Speaking afterward, Chock attributed much of their success to their Egyptian Snake Dance free program, saying "there’s no other program like this in ice dance."[34]

At the 2020 US Championships in Greensboro, Chock/Bates finished first in the rhythm dance, 1.02 points ahead of Hubbell/Donohue despite a slip in their Finnstep pattern.[35] After the free dance, they were first overall, winning their second US title five years after their first one, which is the longest gap between ice dance titles in US history.[36] They also won with the largest margin of victory in US ice dance since the Davis/White era, 4.67 points.[37]

At the 2020 Four Continents Championships in Seoul, Chock/Bates finished second in the rhythm dance with a personal best score of 85.76, just 0.2 points behind Hubbell/Donohue.[38] In the free dance, Chock/Bates finished first despite falling on a transition. They successfully defended their Four Continents title, becoming the first ice dance couple to do so since Belbin/Agosto from 2004 to 2006.[39] Chock/Bates were assigned to compete at the World Championships in Montreal, but these were cancelled as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.[40]

2020–2021 season[edit]

Chock and Bates remained in Montreal during the pandemic and were off-ice for three months before the rink reopened for training.[41] The duo lost a month of training to an injury to Chock. She suffered a concussion after fainting after a walk on a hot day in July.[42] They spent another two weeks in quarantine due to COVID-19 exposure, though neither tested positive. As a result, they abandoned plans to use a new free dance for the season, and withdrew from the 2020 Skate America.[41]

At the 2021 U.S. Championships, Chock/Bates finished first in the rhythm dance, 0.44 points ahead of Hubbell/Donohue despite Chock losing a twizzle level.[43] In the free dance, Bates stepped out of his twizzles, resulting in them finishing second in the free dance and overall.[44] They were named to the US team for the 2021 World Championships in Stockholm.[45]

The Stockholm World Championships were held without an audience due to the pandemic, with Chock/Bates' training partners and four-time World Champions Papadakis/Cizeron declining to attend due to their own COVID illness and lost training time. This led to a hotly contested podium, generally seen as being between six teams, them included.[46] Chock/Bates placed third in the rhythm dance, narrowly behind Hubbell/Donohue in second and over two points ahead of Canada's Gilles/Poirier in fourth.[47] In the free dance, Bates lost a twizzle level. They placed fourth in that segment, dropping to fourth place overall behind Gilles/Poirier in third.[48] Their fourth-place combined with Hubbell/Donohue's second qualified three berths for American dance teams at the 2022 Winter Olympics.[49]

2021–2022 season: Olympic silver, World bronze, and third national title[edit]

The team selected a medley of Billie Eilish songs to perform for their rhythm dance, while, following the success of their Egyptian Snake Dance program, aimed to replicate that success with a new "Contact" program built around the concept of an astronaut romancing an alien.[50] Making their season debut at the 2021 CS Finlandia Trophy, Chock/Bates won the silver medal behind training mates Papadakis/Cizeron.[51]

On the Grand Prix, Chock/Bates competed first at the 2021 Skate America, also attended by primary domestic rivals Hubbell/Donohue. Placing second in both programs, they won the silver medal after finishing 1.31 points behind Hubbell/Donohue.[50][52] At their second event, the 2021 NHK Trophy, Chock/Bates placed narrowly second in the rhythm dance, only 0.31 points behind reigning World champions Sinitsina/Katsalapov. Bates fell right at the beginning of the free dance, though not on an element, and they remained in second place. Assessing the error, Bates said afterward "we responded well and put together a good performance considering the early mishap."[53] Their results qualified them to the Grand Prix Final, but it was subsequently cancelled due to restrictions prompted by the Omicron variant.[54]

At the 2022 U.S. Championships, Chock/Bates placed first in the rhythm dance, leading by 2.55 points over Hubbell/Donohue. They placed second in the free dance, but won overall by 1.78 points due to their lead in the rhythm dance. They were named to the American Olympic team, the third such for Chock and fourth for Bates. Bates became the first U.S. skater of any discipline to compete in four Winter Olympics.[55]

Chock/Bates began the 2022 Winter Olympics as the team captains and American entries in the free dance segment of the Olympic team event. At the time they took the ice, a fifth-place finish in the pairs free segment by Knierim/Frazier had raised the possibility of the second-place American team dropping to third behind Team Japan. However, Chock/Bates would unexpectedly win the segment over Russian entries Sinitsina/Katsalapov, securing America's position over Japan. The American team ultimately won the silver medal, the first Olympic medal for both Chock and Bates.[56][57] In the dance event days later, Chock stumbled midway through the performance, and they finished fourth in the segment. Bates admitted to having "mixed feeling" about the performance," but said "it's not over yet."[58] Fourth in the free dance as well, they finished fourth overall. Bates said after: "I think the fourth place sometimes can be one of the hardest places to finish. But the fact that there are only three spots on the podium is what makes this sport so furious and so loved by so many people and the fans at home and the athletes too. We want the competition to be strong and deep, and that’s exactly what it is."[59]

Chock and Bates concluded the season at the 2022 World Championships, held in Montpellier. Russian dance teams were absent due to the International Skating Union banning all Russian athletes due to their country's invasion of Ukraine.[60] Chock/Bates were third in the rhythm dance with a personal best 87.51 score.[61] Third as well in the free dance, they took the bronze medal returning to the World podium for the first time in six years. With Papadakis/Cizeron taking the gold medal and Hubbell/Donohue the silver, the entire podium consisted of skaters from the Ice Academy of Montreal. Chock said "it was a dream to be able to share that podium with our training mates and to be back on the podium after what feels like a very, very long time."[62]

2022–2023 season[edit]

With another Olympic cycle, the two faced questions about retirement, to which Bates responded "these are the most enjoyable years of our career. We're not ready to step away from competitive ice just yet." With Hubbell/Donohue retired and Papadakis/Cizeron sitting out at least the season, the two entered the 2022–23 season perceived as favourites for the World title; Chock called this "a big goal of ours and it always has been." The two toured for three months following the Montpellier World Championships, performing in forty skating shows, and as a result were not prepared in time to participate in a Challenger event.[63]

For their free dance for the new season, they opted for a medley of songs by Quebec musician Jorane and a program theme inspired by Chock's vintage 1920 engagement ring, namely, "how love is connected and flows through time and transcends the physical world."[63] In their competitive debut on the Grand Prix at the 2022 Skate America, they won the gold medal, albeit losing the free dance to domestic rivals Hawayek/Baker after their choreographic slide element was invalidated. This was their first Grand Prix gold since 2015.[64] Following Skate America, significant alterations were made to their free dance, incorporating the music "Souffrance" by Orange Blossom while also "evolving" the concept to be "about the relationship of the spirit of fire and spirit of air and how one cannot survive without each other."[65] They were generally considered the favourites to win the 2022 NHK Trophy, their second event, but they unexpectedly finished second behind Canadian training partners Fournier Beaudry/Sørensen, taking the silver medal.[66][67] Chock acknowledged the expectations, saying "we discussed what the season will look like for ourselves and I think each season always offers new adversity and new obstacles. And this season is no different. Our goal remains the same: we want to win Worlds this year."[64]

Programs[edit]

With Bates[edit]

Season Short dance Free dance Exhibition
2022–23
[68][69]

  • Film III
  • Les Tectoniques
  • Fem III
    by Jorane
2021–2022
[70]

2020–2021
[41]

Egyptian Snake Dance:

2019–2020
[71]
2018–2019
[72]
2017–2018
[74][75]
2016–2017
[73][76]



2015–2016
[79][80][81][82]



2014–2015
[84]

2013–2014
[86][87]
2012–2013
[87][88]
2011–2012
[87][89]
  • Samba: Chick Chick Boom
  • Rhumba: Boom Diggy Diggy

With Zuerlein[edit]

Season Short dance Free dance Exhibition
2010–2011
[1][90]
  • Cabaret (soundtrack)
  • Nothing Else Matters
    performed by Santa Esmeralda
  • Satellite
    by J. Moreno feat. Santana
Original dance
2009–2010
[90][91]
  • Yema Ya
  • Agua Nile
    by Afro-Cuban Folk
2008–2009
[90][92]
2007–2008
[90][93]
2006–2007
[90]

Competitive highlights[edit]

GP: Grand Prix; CS: Challenger Series; JGP: Junior Grand Prix

With Bates[edit]

Chock and Bates at the 2011 Trophée Éric Bompard
International[94]
Event 11–12 12–13 13–14 14–15 15–16 16–17 17–18 18–19 19–20 20–21 21–22 22–23
Olympics 8th 9th 4th
Worlds 7th 5th 2nd 3rd 7th 5th 6th C 4th 3rd
Four Continents 3rd 2nd 2nd 3rd 1st 1st
GP Final 2nd 2nd 6th 5th 2nd C TBD
GP Cup of China 4th 3rd 2nd 2nd 2nd
GP France 5th 2nd 2nd
GP NHK Trophy 2nd 2nd
GP Rostelecom 3rd 1st 2nd WD
GP Skate America 1st 1st WD 2nd 1st
GP Skate Canada 4th 2nd
CS Finlandia 1st 2nd
CS Nebelhorn 2nd 1st 2nd
CS Ondrej Nepela 2nd
CS U.S. Classic 1st
Finlandia Trophy 3rd 2nd
Nebelhorn Trophy 1st
Toruń Cup 1st
U.S. Classic 4th
National[87]
U.S. Champ. 5th 2nd 2nd 1st 2nd 2nd 3rd 2nd 1st 2nd 1st
Team events
Olympics 2nd T
1st P
World Team Trophy 1st T
1st P
1st T
3rd P
3rd T
2nd P
Team Challenge Cup 1st T
2nd P
TBD: Assigned; WD: Withdrew; C = Event cancelled
T: Team result; P: Personal result. Medals awarded for team result only.

With Zuerlein[edit]

Chock and Zuerlein at 2010 Trophee Bompard
International[95]
Event 06–07 07–08 08–09 09–10 10–11
Worlds 9th
Four Continents 5th 5th
GP Bompard 3rd
GP Cup of China 8th
GP Skate America 6th
GP Skate Canada 3rd
International: Junior[95]
Junior Worlds 1st
JGP Final 5th 1st
JGP Estonia 1st
JGP Germany 3rd
JGP Italy 1st
JGP U.K. 1st
National[90]
U.S. Champ. 5th N 3rd J 1st J 5th 3rd
Pacific Coast 1st N
Levels – N: Novice; J: Junior

Detailed results[edit]

With Bates[edit]

2022–23 season
Date Event RD FD Total
December 8–11, 2022 2022–23 Grand Prix Final
TBD

TBD

TBD
November 18–20, 2022 2022 NHK Trophy 2
85.00
2
124.13
2
209.13
October 21–23, 2022 2022 Skate America 1
82.63
2
120.95
1
202.80
2021–22 season
Date Event RD FD Total
March 21–27, 2022 2022 World Championships 3
87.51
3
129.32
3
216.83
February 12–14, 2022 2022 Winter Olympics 4
84.14
4
130.63
4
214.77
February 4–7, 2022 2022 Winter Olympics — Team event 1
129.07
2T
January 3–9, 2022 2022 U.S. Championships 1
91.94
2
135.43
1
227.37
November 12–14, 2021 2021 NHK Trophy 2
86.02
2
124.76
2
210.78
October 22–24, 2021 2021 Skate America 2
82.55
2
125.68
2
208.23
October 7–10, 2021 2021 CS Finlandia Trophy 2
83.72
2
124.59
2
208.31
2020–21 season
Date Event RD FD Total
March 22–28, 2021 2021 World Championships 3
85.15
4
127.54
4
212.69
January 11–21, 2021 2021 U.S. Championships 1
90.10
2
132.83
2
222.93
2019–20 season
Date Event RD FD Total
February 4–9, 2020 2020 Four Continents Championships 2
85.76
1
127.42
1
213.18
January 20–26, 2020 2020 U.S. Championships 1
87.63
1
134.23
1
221.86
December 5–8, 2019 2019–20 Grand Prix Final 3
81.67
2
129.01
2
210.68
November 8–10, 2019 2019 Cup of China 2
80.34
1
128.21
2
208.55
November 1–3, 2019 2019 Internationaux de France 2
80.69
2
124.15
2
204.84
October 11–13, 2019 2019 CS Finlandia Trophy 1
78.80
1
119.46
1
198.26
September 17–22, 2019 2019 C.S. US International Classic 1
80.18
1
122.22
1
202.40
2018–19 season
Date Event SD FD Total
March 18–24, 2019 2019 World Championships 6
82.32
6
122.60
6
204.92
February 7–10, 2019 2019 Four Continents Championships 2
81.17
1
126.25
1
207.42
January 19–27, 2019 2019 U.S. Championships 2
82.33
2
129.19
2
211.52
January 8–13, 2019 2019 Toruń Cup 1
75.30
1
122.12
1
197.42
2017–18 season
Date Event SD FD Total
March 19–25, 2018 2018 World Championships 5
75.66
5
111.62
5
187.28
February 19–20, 2018 2018 Winter Olympics 7
75.45
12
100.13
9
175.58
January 5–7, 2018 2018 U.S. Championships 3
77.61
1
118.99
3
196.60
December 7–10, 2017 2017–18 Grand Prix Final 5
74.36
3
112.79
5
187.15
November 17–19, 2017 2017 Internationaux de France 2
73.55
2
108.30
2
181.85
November 3–5, 2017 2017 Cup of China 2
72.66
2
111.84
2
184.50
2016–17 season
Date Event SD FD Total
April 20–23, 2017 2017 World Team Trophy 1
79.05
2
109.96
3T/2P
189.01
March 29 – April 2, 2017 2017 World Championships 4
76.25
8
105.79
7
182.04
February 15–19, 2017 2017 Four Continents Championships 3
74.67
3
110.91
3
185.58
January 14–22, 2017 2017 U.S. Championships 2
79.96
1
119.08
2
199.04
December 8–11, 2016 2016–17 Grand Prix Final 6
70.87
4
108.45
6
179.32
November 4–6, 2016 2016 Rostelecom Cup 1
75.04
3
107.09
2
182.13
October 28–30, 2016 2016 Skate Canada International 2
76.21
1
112.03
2
188.24
Sept. 30–Oct. 2, 2016 2016 CS Ondrej Nepela Memorial 1
72.72
2
98.20
2
170.92
September 22–24, 2016 2016 CS Nebelhorn Trophy 2
70.78
2
108.40
2
179.18
2015–16 season
Date Event SD FD Total
April 22–24, 2016 2016 Team Challenge Cup 2
111.30
1T/2P
Mar. 28–Apr. 3, 2016 2016 World Championships 3
72.46
3
113.31
3
185.77
February 16–21, 2016 2016 Four Continents Championships 4
67.05
2
107.59
2
174.64
January 15–24, 2016 2016 U.S. Championships 1
75.14
2
111.79
2
186.93
December 10–13, 2015 2015–16 Grand Prix Final 2
71.64
3
105.91
2
177.55
November 5–8, 2015 2015 Cup of China 2
65.36
2
103.80
2
169.16
October 23–25, 2015 2015 Skate America 1
70.56
1
102.66
1
173.22
September 24–26, 2015 2015 CS Nebelhorn Trophy 1
67.74
1
101.76
1
169.50
2014–15 season
Date Event SD FD Total
April 16–19, 2015 2015 World Team Trophy 2
72.17
3
102.24
1T/3P
174.41
March 23–29, 2015 2015 World Championships 1
74.47
2
106.87
2
181.34
February 9–15, 2015 2015 Four Continents Championships 1
70.38
2
105.80
2
176.18
January 18–25, 2015 2015 U.S. Championships 1
73.95
1
111.11
1
185.06
December 11–14, 2014 2014–15 Grand Prix Final 2
65.06
2
102.03
2
167.09
November 14–16, 2014 2014 Rostelecom Cup 1
68.86
1
105.42
1
174.28
October 24–26, 2014 2014 Skate America 1
68.96
1
102.07
1
171.03
September 24–27, 2014 2014 CS Nebelhorn Trophy 2
62.80
1
100.93
2
163.73
2013–14 season
Date Event SD FD Total
March 24–30, 2014 2014 World Championships 5
67.71
4
99.88
5
167.59
February 6–22, 2014 2014 Winter Olympics 8
65.46
8
99.18
8
164.44
January 5–12, 2014 2014 U.S. Championships 2
73.41
2
108.03
2
181.44
November 22–24, 2013 2013 Rostelecom Cup 4
57.80
3
95.57
3
153.37
November 1–3, 2013 2013 Cup of China 3
56.77
3
93.76
3
150.53
October 4–6, 2013 2013 Finlandia Trophy 2
53.34
2
89.72
2
143.06
2012–13 season
Date Event SD FD Total
April 11–14, 2013 2013 World Team Trophy 1
66.54
1
98.37
1T/1P
164.91
March 11–17, 2013 2013 World Championships 7
66.74
6
97.19
7
163.93
February 8–11, 2013 2013 Four Continents Championships 3
65.44
5
94.98
3
160.42
January 19–27, 2013 2013 U.S. Championships 2
70.80
2
105.11
2
175.91
November 2–4, 2012 2012 Cup of China 4
59.26
4
90.28
4
149.54
September 27–29, 2012 2012 Nebelhorn Trophy 2
56.97
1
90.82
1
147.79
September 13–15, 2012 2012 U.S. International Classic 1
62.89
5
76.95
4
139.84
2011–12 season
Date Event SD FD Total
January 22–29, 2012 2012 U.S. Championships 5
55.49
5
89.59
5
145.08
November 17–20, 2011 2011 Trophée Éric Bompard 5
52.01
5
78.93
5
130.94
October 27–30, 2011 2011 Skate Canada International 6
51.24
4
84.67
4
135.10
October 6–9, 2011 2011 Finlandia Trophy 3
53.91
3
82.97
3
136.88

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Madison Chock / Greg Zuerlein: 2010/2011". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on July 19, 2011.
  2. ^ a b c d Mittan, J. Barry (March 8, 2009). "Chock Full of Gold". GoldenSkate.com. Retrieved April 16, 2018.
  3. ^ Curley, Julia (10 February 2018). "Here's how Olympic ice dancers Evan Bates and Madison Chock fell in love". TODAY.
  4. ^ Lang, Cady (20 February 2018). "What to Know About Madison Chock and Evan Bates' Relationship". Time.
  5. ^ Slater, Georgia; Leon, Anya (June 16, 2022). "Olympians Madison Chock and Evan Bates Are Engaged! See the Sweet Photos from Their 'Perfect Day'". People.
  6. ^ "2006 U.S. Junior Championships". U.S. Figure Skating. Archived from the original on 2011-06-13.
  7. ^ a b Rosewater, Amy (July 1, 2011). "Chock, Bates form new on-ice partnership". IceNetwork. Retrieved July 1, 2011.
  8. ^ "World Junior Figure Skating Championships: Ice Dance" (PDF). International Skating Union. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 October 2013.
  9. ^ "Madison Chock and Greg Zuerlein Announce End of Partnership". U.S. Figure Skating. June 7, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  10. ^ Rutherford, Lynn (September 2, 2011). "Chock, Bates take the fast track to Skate Canada". IceNetwork. Retrieved September 2, 2011.
  11. ^ "Shpilband moving to Novi, bringing Chock and Bates". IceNetwork. June 12, 2012.
  12. ^ Flade, Tatjana (September 30, 2012). "2012 Nebelhorn Trophy". Golden Skate.
  13. ^ "Madison Chock". sochi2014.com. Archived from the original on March 20, 2014.
  14. ^ Slater, Paula (28 January 2015). "Chock and Bates push forward". Golden Skate.
  15. ^ Rutherford, Lynn (October 24, 2015). "Strictly ballroom: Chock, Bates lead with new short". IceNetwork.com.
  16. ^ Slater, Paula (November 12, 2015). "Chock and Bates prepare for Barcelona". Golden Skate.
  17. ^ Flade, Tatjana [@Tatjana21] (October 21, 2015). "Ice Dance news: @chockolate02 /@Evan_Bates will unveil new SD at #GPMilwaukee #SkateAmerica. Wanted to make the rhythms more clear" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  18. ^ a b Brannen, Sarah S. (April 11, 2018). "The Inside Edge: Hill-Wampler returns to coaching". IceNetwork.com.
  19. ^ a b Seidel, Jeff (February 19, 2018). "Seidel: Injury pops up at worst possible time for Madison Chock". Detroit Free Press. Archived from the original on April 16, 2018.
  20. ^ Carlson, Adam (February 19, 2018). "U.S. Skater Couple Competed Through a 'Kind of Traumatic' Moment Just Before Taking the Ice". People. Archived from the original on April 16, 2018.
  21. ^ Slater, Paula (February 20, 2019). "Virtue and Moir capture second Olympic gold; make history". Golden Skate.
  22. ^ "Athlete Profile - Madison CHOCK". pyeongchang2018.com. Archived from the original on April 16, 2018.
  23. ^ "Madison Chock and Evan Bates Move Training Base to Montreal". U.S. Figure Skating. May 25, 2018.
  24. ^ "American Assignment Changes For Grand Prix Events In Canada, Finland". United States Figure Skating Association. October 16, 2018.
  25. ^ Mammoser, Scott (January 27, 2019). "Hubbell and Donohue defend U.S. ice dance title". Golden Skate.
  26. ^ Slater, Paula (February 10, 2019). "Chock and Bates take surprise gold in Ice Dance at Four Continents". Golden Skate.
  27. ^ "Ice dance duo Chock-Bates golden in Salt Lake". ESPN. September 22, 2019.
  28. ^ Wood, Colton (October 13, 2019). "Chock and Bates Capture Second Straight Gold Medal at Finlandia Trophy". U.S. Figure Skating Fan Zone.
  29. ^ Slater, Paula (November 1, 2019). "Papadakis and Cizeron set new record at 2019 Internationaux de France". Golden Skate.
  30. ^ Slater, Paula (November 2, 2019). "Papadakis and Cizeron defend Grand Prix title in Grenoble". Golden Skate.
  31. ^ Slater, Paula (November 8, 2019). "Sinitsina and Katsalapov lead after Rhythm Dance at Cup of China". Golden Skate.
  32. ^ Slater, Paula (November 9, 2019). "Sinitsina and Katsalapov take first Grand Prix gold at Cup of China". Golden Skate.
  33. ^ Slater, Paula (December 6, 2019). "Papadakis and Cizeron lead after Rhythm Dance in Torino". Golden Skate.
  34. ^ Slater, Paula (December 8, 2019). "Papadakis and Cizeron reclaim Grand Prix title". Golden Skate.
  35. ^ Slater, Paula (January 24, 2020). "Chock and Bates dance to lead in Greensboro". Golden Skate.
  36. ^ "Hubbell, Donohue explain wrong-way slip-up". OlympicTalk | NBC Sports. 2020-01-26. Retrieved 2020-01-26.
  37. ^ "Madison Chock, Evan Bates snake to U.S. ice dance title". OlympicTalk | NBC Sports. 2020-01-26. Retrieved 2020-01-26.
  38. ^ Slater, Paula (February 6, 2020). "Hubbell and Donohue take narrow lead at Four Continents". Golden Skate.
  39. ^ Slater, Paula (February 7, 2020). "Chock and Bates defend title at Four Continents". Golden Skate.
  40. ^ Ewing, Lori (March 11, 2020). "World figure skating championships cancelled in Montreal". CBC Sports.
  41. ^ a b c Ford, Bonnie D. (October 22, 2020). "How did pairs and ice dancers prepare for Skate America during a pandemic? It wasn't easy". ESPN.
  42. ^ Penny, Brandon (January 15, 2021). "Madison Chock, back from concussion, joins Evan Bates to lead nationals ice dance". NBC Sports.
  43. ^ Slater, Paula (January 15, 2021). "Near-tie for Chock and Bates & Hubbell and Donohue at US Nationals". Golden Skate.
  44. ^ Slater, Paula (January 17, 2021). "Hubbell and Donohue take back title at US Nationals". Golden Skate.
  45. ^ "U.S. Figure Skating Announces Men's, Pairs and Ice Dance Selections for World Team". U.S. Figure Skating Fan Zone. U.S. Figure Skating. January 17, 2021.
  46. ^ Flade, Tatjana (March 18, 2021). "Ice Dance world title up for grabs in Stockholm". Golden Skate.
  47. ^ Slater, Paula (March 26, 2021). "Sinitsina and Katsalapov dance to lead at Worlds". Golden Skate.
  48. ^ Slater, Paula (March 27, 2021). "Sinitsina and Katsalapov strike gold in Stockholm". Golden Skate.
  49. ^ "Communication No. 2388". International Skating Union. April 1, 2021.
  50. ^ a b Sullivan Hill, Maura (25 October 2021). "Hubbell and Donohue claim fourth straight – and final – Skate America title". Figure Skaters Online.
  51. ^ Dean, Taylor (October 10, 2021). "Team USA Collects Six Medals in Finland and Austria". U.S. Figure Skating.
  52. ^ Slater, Paula (October 24, 2021). "Hubbell and Donohue win fourth consecutive Skate America gold". Golden Skate.
  53. ^ Slater, Paula (November 13, 2021). "Sinitsina and Katsalapov take fourth Grand Prix medal at NHK Trophy". Golden Skate.
  54. ^ "Figure skating Grand Prix Final cancelled over travel rules". CBC Sports. December 2, 2021.
  55. ^ Brandon Penny (2022-01-09). "U.S. Olympic ice dance team named, Bates makes record fourth". OlympicTalk | NBC Sports. Retrieved 2022-01-16.
  56. ^ Carpenter, Les (February 7, 2022). "Vincent Zhou's positive covid test casts pall over U.S. team's silver medal". Washington Post.
  57. ^ Slater, Paula (February 7, 2022). "ROC wins Olympic figure skating team event". Golden Skate.
  58. ^ Slater, Paula (February 12, 2022). "Papadakis and Cizeron of France score new record high in Beijing". Golden Skate.
  59. ^ Slater, Paula (February 14, 2022). "Papadakis and Cizeron reign in Beijing". Golden Skate.
  60. ^ Campigotto, Jesse (March 22, 2022). "Get ready for a bizarre figure skating world championships". CBC Sports.
  61. ^ Slater, Paula (March 25, 2022). "Papadakis and Cizeron set another record score in the Rhythm Dance". Golden Skate.
  62. ^ Slater, Paula (March 26, 2022). "Papadakis and Cizeron win fifth World title". Golden Skate.
  63. ^ a b Rutherford, Lynn (October 22, 2022). "Chock and Bates passionately locked in with US ice dance legacy". United States Olympic Committee.
  64. ^ a b Slater, Paula (October 23, 2022). "Chock and Bates win third Skate America title". Golden Skate.
  65. ^ Slater, Paula (November 19, 2022). "Fournier-Beadury and Soerensen shake it up in Japan". Golden Skate.
  66. ^ "Fournier Beaudry/Soerensen (CAN) find rhythm to edge out favorites Chock/Bates (USA) in Ice Dance". International Skating Union. November 18, 2022.
  67. ^ "Ice Dance favorites floored as Fournier Beaudry/Soerensen (CAN) grab maiden Grand Prix gold at NHK Trophy". International Skating Union. November 19, 2022.
  68. ^ "Madison Chock / Evan Bates: 2022/2023 (1st FD)". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on October 21, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  69. ^ "Madison Chock / Evan Bates: 2022/2023 (2nd FD)". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on November 16, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  70. ^ "Madison Chock / Evan Bates: 2021/2022". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on October 19, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  71. ^ "Madison Chock / Evan Bates: 2019/2020". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on October 13, 2019.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  72. ^ "Madison Chock / Evan Bates: 2018/2019". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on March 18, 2019.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  73. ^ a b c d Rutherford, Lynn (August 16, 2016). "Ward gets Chock, Bates into the hip-hop groove". IceNetwork.com.
  74. ^ "Madison Chock / Evan Bates: 2017/2018". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on April 16, 2018.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  75. ^ Rutherford, Lynn (November 2, 2017). "Chock, Bates set to begin Olympic season in Beijing". IceNetwork.com.
  76. ^ "Madison Chock / Evan Bates: 2016/2017". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 20, 2017.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  77. ^ a b "2017 Stars on Ice: In Dreams Tour - Music". Stars on Ice. Archived from the original on April 14, 2017. Retrieved April 15, 2017.
  78. ^ Smuckers Skating Spectacular 2017 (Television production). NBC. January 28, 2017.
  79. ^ Madison Chock and Evan Bates [@chockbates] (August 21, 2015). "Our new free dance music" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  80. ^ Rutherford, Lynn (August 24, 2015). "Bates: 'We're trying to take that last step up'". IceNetwork.
  81. ^ "Madison Chock / Evan Bates: 2015/2016". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on October 17, 2015.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  82. ^ "Madison Chock / Evan Bates: 2015/2016". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 27, 2016.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  83. ^ a b c "2016 Stars on Ice: E-motion Tour - Music". Stars on Ice. Retrieved April 21, 2016.
  84. ^ "Madison Chock / Evan Bates: 2014/2015". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 20, 2015.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  85. ^ 2014 Skate America Gala
  86. ^ "Madison Chock/ Evan Bates: 2013/2014". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on July 1, 2014.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  87. ^ a b c d "Madison Chock / Evan Bates". IceNetwork.com. Archived from the original on August 12, 2016. * "Earlier versions: 2011 to 2013". Archived from the original on November 24, 2011.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  88. ^ "Madison Chock/ Evan Bates: 2012/2013". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on June 21, 2013.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  89. ^ "Madison Chock / Evan Bates: 2011/2012". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on April 19, 2012.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  90. ^ a b c d e f "Madison Chock / Greg Zuerlein". IceNetwork.com. Archived from the original on July 13, 2011.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  91. ^ "Madison Chock / Greg Zuerlein: 2009/2010". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on June 15, 2010.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  92. ^ "Madison Chock / Greg Zuerlein: 2008/2009". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on June 1, 2009.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  93. ^ "Madison Chock / Greg Zuerlein: 2007/2008". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on January 7, 2008.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  94. ^ "Competition Results: Madison Chock / Evan Bates". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on April 16, 2018.
  95. ^ a b "Competition Results: Madison Chock / Greg Zuerlein". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on January 26, 2012.
Cite error: A list-defined reference named "People220419" is not used in the content (see the help page).

External links[edit]

Media related to Madison Chock at Wikimedia Commons