Madison County, Missouri

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Madison County
Madison County Courthouse at Fredericktown
Madison County Courthouse at Fredericktown
Map of Missouri highlighting Madison County
Location within the U.S. state of Missouri
Map of the United States highlighting Missouri
Missouri's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 37°29′N 90°20′W / 37.48°N 90.34°W / 37.48; -90.34
Country United States
State Missouri
FoundedDecember 14, 1818
Named forJames Madison
SeatFredericktown
Largest cityFredericktown
Area
 • Total498 sq mi (1,290 km2)
 • Land494 sq mi (1,280 km2)
 • Water3.2 sq mi (8 km2)  0.6%
Population
 (2010)
 • Total12,226
 • Estimate 
(2018)
12,188
 • Density25/sq mi (9.5/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district8th
Websitemadisoncountymo.us

Madison County is a county located in the Lead Belt region of the U.S. state of Missouri. As of the 2010 census, the population was 12,226.[1] Its county seat and largest city is Fredericktown.[2] The county was officially organized on December 14, 1818, and was named after President James Madison.[3]

Mining has been a key industry in this area with Madison County recorded as having the oldest lead mine west of the Mississippi River.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 498 square miles (1,290 km2), of which 494 square miles (1,280 km2) is land and 3.2 square miles (8.3 km2) (0.6%) is water.[4]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major highways[edit]

National protected area[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18202,047
18302,37115.8%
18403,39543.2%
18506,00376.8%
18605,664−5.6%
18705,8493.3%
18808,87651.8%
18909,2684.4%
19009,9757.6%
191011,27313.0%
192010,721−4.9%
19309,418−12.2%
19409,6562.5%
195010,3807.5%
19609,366−9.8%
19708,641−7.7%
198010,72524.1%
199011,1273.7%
200011,8006.0%
201012,2263.6%
2018 (est.)12,188[5]−0.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2010-2015[1]

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 11,800 people, 4,711 households, and 3,330 families residing in the county. The population density was 24 people per square mile (9/km2). There were 5,656 housing units at an average density of 11 per square mile (4/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 98.30% White, 0.13% Black or African American, 0.25% Native American, 0.29% Asian, 0.20% from other races, and 0.83% from two or more races. Approximately 0.56% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 4,711 households, out of which 31.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.40% were married couples living together, 10.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.30% were non-families. 25.90% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 2.93.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.60% under the age of 18, 7.90% from 18 to 24, 26.30% from 25 to 44, 23.30% from 45 to 64, and 18.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 92.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,421, and the median income for a family was $37,474. Males had a median income of $27,670 versus $15,909 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,825. About 12.80% of families and 17.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.60% of those under age 18 and 16.20% of those age 65 or over.

Religion[edit]

According to the Association of Religion Data Archives County Membership Report (2000), Madison County is a part of the Bible Belt with evangelical Protestantism being the majority religion. The most predominant denominations among residents in Madison County who adhere to a religion are Southern Baptists (37.87%), Independent/Non-Charismatic Churches (17.42%), and National Association of Free Will Baptists (12.10%).

Education[edit]

Of adults 25 years of age and older in Madison County, 68.6% possesses a high school diploma while 7.8% holds a bachelor's degree as their highest educational attainment.

Public schools[edit]

  • Fredericktown R-I School District - Fredericktown
    • Fredericktown Elementary School (PK-02)
    • Fredericktown Intermediate School (03-05)
    • Fredericktown Middle School (06-08)
    • Fredericktown High School (09-12)
  • Marquand-Zion R-VI School District - Marquand
    • Marquand-Zion Elementary School (K-06)
    • Marquand-Zion High School (07-12)

Private schools[edit]

Public libraries[edit]

  • Fredericktown Branch Library[11]

Politics[edit]

Local[edit]

Both the Republican and Democratic parties split control of the local elected offices in Madison County.

Madison County, Missouri
Elected countywide officials
Assessor Sue Smallen Yount Republican
Circuit Clerk Tenia Hermann Republican
County Clerk Donal E. Firebaugh Democratic
Collector Debby Boone Republican
Commissioner
(Presiding)
Jason Green Republican
Commissioner
(District 1)
Tom Stephens Republican
Commissioner
(District 2)
Larry Kemp Republican
Coroner Collin Follis Democratic
Prosecuting Attorney M. Dwight Robbins Republican
Public Administrator Carol Lachance Republican
Recorder Saundra Ivison Republican
Sheriff Katy McCutcheon Democratic
Surveyor William Douglas McFarland Democratic
Treasurer Jessica Stevens Republican

State[edit]

All of Madison County is a part of Missouri's 156th District in the Missouri House of Representatives and is currently represented by Shelley Keeney (R-Marble Hill). The 156th District includes all of Bollinger and Madison counties as well as most of Wayne County.

Missouri House of Representatives - District 156 - Madison County (2010)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Shelley (White) Keeney* 2,991 100.00 +51.44

All of Madison County is a part of Missouri's 27th District in the Missouri Senate and is currently represented by State Senator Jason Crowell (R-Cape Girardeau). Crowell defeated Linda Sanders (D-Jackson) by almost a two-to-one margin, 64.24-35.76 percent in the district. The 27th Senatorial District includes all of Bollinger, Cape Girardeau, Madison, Mississippi, Perry and Scott counties.

Missouri Senate - District 27 - Madison County (2008)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Jason Crowell 2,778 57.31
Democratic Linda Sanders 2,069 42.69
Past Gubernatorial Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2012 46.95% 2,298 50.15% 2,455 2.90% 142
2008 43.13% 2,160 54.29% 2,719 2.58% 129
2004 57.86% 2,819 40.48% 1,972 1.66% 81
2000 50.50% 2,210 46.85% 2,050 2.65% 116
1996 36.82% 1,709 60.51% 2,809 2.67% 124
1992 45.62% 2,289 54.38% 2,728 0.00% 0
1988 63.41% 2,989 36.42% 1,717 0.17% 8
1984 58.94% 2,746 41.06% 1,913 0.00% 0
1980 58.00% 2,889 41.92% 2,088 0.08% 4
1976 50.34% 1,994 49.63% 1,966 0.00% 0

Federal[edit]

Madison County is included in Missouri's 8th Congressional District and is currently represented by Jason T. Smith (R-Salem) in the U.S. House of Representatives. Smith won a special election on Tuesday, June 4, 2013, to finish out the remaining term of U.S. Representative Jo Ann Emerson (R-Cape Girardeau). Emerson announced her resignation a month after being reelected with over 70 percent of the vote in the district. She resigned to become CEO of the National Rural Electric Cooperative.

U.S. House of Representatives - District 8 – Madison County (2012)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Jo Ann Emerson 3,655 74.65 +8.63
Democratic Jack Rushin 1,106 22.59 -6.72
Libertarian Rick Vandeven 135 2.76 +1.31
U.S. House of Representatives - District 8 - Special Election – Madison County (2013)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Jason T. Smith 608 59.84
Democratic Steve Hodges 323 31.79
Constitution Doug Enyart 43 4.23
Write-in Thomas Brown 29 2.85
Libertarian Bill Slantz 12 1.18
Write-in Wayne L. Byington 1 0.10

Missouri presidential preference primary (2008)[edit]

In the 2008 Missouri Presidential Preference Primary, voters in Madison County from both political parties supported candidates who finished in second place in the state at large and nationally.

Madison County, Missouri
2008 Republican primary in Missouri
John McCain452 (35.48%)
Mike Huckabee560 (43.96%)
Mitt Romney185 (14.52%)
Ron Paul51 (4.00%)
Madison County, Missouri
2008 Democratic primary in Missouri
Hillary Clinton971 (68.72%)
Barack Obama344 (24.35%)
John Edwards (withdrawn)64 (4.53%)
Uncommitted22 (1.56%)

Political culture[edit]

Presidential elections results
Presidential Elections Results[12]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2020 80.8% 4,584 18.0% 1,019 1.3% 73
2016 77.1% 4,102 18.9% 1,005 4.0% 214
2012 65.5% 3,227 32.2% 1,588 2.3% 115
2008 57.6% 2,897 40.6% 2,042 1.8% 89
2004 59.1% 2,905 40.1% 1,972 0.8% 41
2000 56.3% 2,460 41.8% 1,828 1.9% 85
1996 34.2% 1,595 50.4% 2,351 15.4% 717
1992 32.9% 1,673 49.2% 2,501 17.9% 908
1988 53.8% 2,528 46.1% 2,167 0.2% 8
1984 60.1% 2,808 39.9% 1,862
1980 53.0% 2,618 45.2% 2,231 1.8% 89
1976 43.6% 1,739 55.9% 2,229 0.5% 21
1972 66.2% 2,837 33.8% 1,451
1968 50.3% 2,164 35.4% 1,521 14.3% 615
1964 39.3% 1,756 60.8% 2,718
1960 61.2% 2,960 38.8% 1,874
1956 54.8% 2,763 45.2% 2,280
1952 53.0% 2,676 47.0% 2,375
1948 45.4% 2,086 54.6% 2,509 0.1% 4
1944 50.7% 2,277 49.1% 2,203 0.2% 8
1940 50.9% 2,495 49.0% 2,405 0.1% 5
1936 46.4% 2,013 53.5% 2,323 0.1% 6
1932 37.7% 1,428 62.0% 2,347 0.3% 13
1928 62.0% 2,165 38.0% 1,326
1924 48.1% 1,569 51.0% 1,665 1.0% 31
1920 52.2% 2,023 47.2% 1,830 0.6% 23
1916 47.8% 1,230 51.0% 1,310 1.2% 31
1912 37.6% 827 51.2% 1,126 11.2% 247
1908 47.3% 1,248 50.1% 1,321 2.7% 70
1904 49.3% 1,106 48.0% 1,076 2.7% 60
1900 42.8% 881 55.9% 1,153 1.3% 27
1896 38.1% 780 61.3% 1,256 0.6% 12
1892 36.5% 635 58.0% 1,010 5.6% 97
1888 36.6% 685 59.7% 1,118 3.7% 69

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Town[edit]

Villages[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Other unincorporated communities[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved September 10, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^ Eaton, David Wolfe (1916). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. pp. 192.
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on October 21, 2013. Retrieved November 16, 2014.
  5. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved November 18, 2019.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 16, 2014.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved November 16, 2014.
  8. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 16, 2014.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 16, 2014.
  10. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  11. ^ Breeding, Marshall. "Fredericktown Branch Library". Libraries.org. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  12. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2021-03-23.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 37°29′N 90°20′W / 37.48°N 90.34°W / 37.48; -90.34