Mads Pedersen (cyclist)

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Mads Pedersen
Mads Pedersen.jpg
Pedersen in 2017
Personal information
Born (1995-12-18) 18 December 1995 (age 23)
Height179 cm (5 ft 10 in)
Weight70 kg (154 lb)
Team information
Current teamTrek–Segafredo
DisciplineRoad
RoleRider
Rider typeClassics specialist[1]/ time triallist
Professional team(s)
2014–2015Cult Energy–Vital Water[2]
2016Stölting Service Group
2017–Trek–Segafredo
Major wins
Stage races
Danmark Rundt (2017)

One-day races and Classics

World Road Race Championships (2019)
National Road Race Championships (2017)
Tour de l'Eurométropole (2018)

Mads Pedersen (born 18 December 1995) is a Danish professional racing cyclist who currently rides for UCI WorldTeam Trek–Segafredo.[3] In September 2019, he won the men's road race at the 2019 UCI Road World Championships in Yorkshire, England, and became the first Danish cyclist to win the men's World Championship road race title.

Career[edit]

Pedersen at the 2017 Giro d'Italia.

In 2013, Pedersen won the Paris–Roubaix Juniors and went on to claim the silver medal in the World Championships junior road race. Pedersen won Ghent–Wevelgem U23, the U23 Tour of Norway, and a stage of the Tour de l'Avenir prior to turning professional.[4]

Trek–Segafredo (2017–present)[edit]

In August 2016 Trek–Segafredo announced that they had signed Pedersen through to 2018.[1]

In his neo-pro season, he was named in the start list for the 2017 Giro d'Italia.[5] He also become national champion of Denmark, and took overall victory in the Tour du Poitou Charentes after winning the time trial.[4] In September 2017, Pedersen took overall victory at the Danmark Rundt.[6]

In April 2018, he finished in second place in the Tour of Flanders following a spirited break away.[7] Pedersen attacked ahead of the Koppenberg with just over 50 kilometres (31 miles) remaining, and was joined by Dylan van Baarle (Team Sky) and Sebastian Langeveld (EF Education First–Drapac p/b Cannondale). Eventual winner Niki Terpstra (Quick-Step Floors) caught and passed Pedersen on the final ascent of the Oude Kwaremont and rode to victory, but Pedersen was strong enough to hold off world champion Peter Sagan (Bora–Hansgrohe) and the chasing peloton to become the youngest podium finisher in 40 years.

On 29 September 2019, Pedersen won the World Road Race Championship in a rain-soaked race, in and around Harrogate, in Yorkshire, England.[8] He is the first Danish cyclist to win a men's world championship road race title.[9]

Major results[edit]

2012
1st Jersey yellow.svg Overall Tour of Istria
1st Stage 3
1st Jersey yellow.svg Overall Trofeo Karlsberg
1st Stage 3a (ITT)
1st Jersey yellow.svg Overall Sint-Martinusprijs Kontich
1st Jersey green.svg Points classification
1st Jersey white.svg Young rider classification
1st Prologue & Stage 4
2013
1st Paris–Roubaix Juniors
1st Jersey yellow.svg Overall Course de la Paix Juniors
1st Jersey green.svg Points classification
1st Stages 2a (ITT) & 4
1st Jersey yellow.svg Overall Trofeo Karlsberg
1st Stages 3a (ITT), 3b & 4
1st Stage 4 Sint-Martinusprijs Kontich
1st Aubel-Thimister-La Gleize
1st Jersey polkadot.svg Mountains classification
1st Stage 3
1st Stage 4 Grand Prix Rüebliland
1st Stage 4 Giro della Lunigiana
2nd Silver medal blank.svg Road race, UCI Junior Road World Championships
2014
1st Eschborn-Frankfurt City Loop U23
3rd Time trial, National Under–23 Road Championships
2015
1st Stage 2 Tour de l'Avenir
2nd Overall ZLM Roompot Tour
1st Stage 2 (TTT) & 3
6th Overall Four Days of Dunkirk
6th La Côte Picarde
8th Overall Tour des Fjords
9th Ronde van Vlaanderen Beloften
2016
Tour of Norway
1st Jersey polkadot.svg Mountains classification
1st Stage 3
1st Fyen Rundt
1st Kattekoers
7th Porec Trophy
8th Overall Three Days of De Panne
2017
1st MaillotDinamarca.svg Road race, National Road Championships
1st MaillotCyan.PNG Overall Danmark Rundt
1st Jersey gold.svg Points classification
1st Jersey green.svg Young rider classification
1st Stage 3
1st Jersey white.svg Overall Tour du Poitou-Charentes
1st Jersey orange.svg Young rider classification
1st Stage 4 (ITT)
2018
1st Tour de l'Eurométropole
1st Fyen Rundt
1st Stage 2 Herald Sun Tour
1st Stage 4 (ITT) Danmark Rundt
2nd Tour of Flanders
5th Dwars door Vlaanderen
7th GP Horsens
2019
1st Jersey rainbow.svg Road race, UCI Road World Championships
1st Grand Prix d'Isbergues

Grand Tour general classification results timeline[edit]

Grand Tour 2017 2018 2019
A pink jersey Giro d'Italia 138 140
A yellow jersey Tour de France
A red jersey Vuelta a España

Classics & Monuments results timeline[edit]

Monument 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Milan–San Remo  —  —  —  —  —
Tour of Flanders  —  —  — 2 DNF
Paris–Roubaix  —  — 95 71 51
Liège–Bastogne–Liège  —  —  —  —  —
Giro di Lombardia  —  —  —  —
Classic 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Omloop Het Nieuwsblad DNF 39 DNF 92 105
Kuurne–Brussels–Kuurne  —  —  — 81 DNF
Strade Bianche  —  — DNF DNF  —
Dwars door Vlaanderen DNF 15 150 5 89
E3 Harelbeke  —  — 90 DNF DNF
Gent-Wevelgem  —  —  — DNF 33
Scheldeprijs 160  — DNF  — 101
Legend
Did not compete
DNF Did not finish

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Trek-Segafredo confirm signing of Mads Pedersen". cyclingnews.com. 8 August 2016. Retrieved 8 August 2016.
  2. ^ Mads Pedersen at Cycling Archives
  3. ^ "Trek-Segafredo announce official 2019 rosters for men and women". Trek Bicycle Corporation. Intrepid Corporation. 27 December 2018. Retrieved 5 January 2019.
  4. ^ a b "Pedersen comes of age at the Tour of Flanders - Cyclingnews.com". Retrieved 30 April 2018.
  5. ^ "2017: 100th Giro d'Italia: Start List". Pro Cycling Stats. Retrieved 2 May 2017.
  6. ^ "Post Danmark Rundt - Tour of Denmark 2017: Stage 5 Results - Cyclingnews.com". Retrieved 30 April 2018.
  7. ^ "Dutchman Niki Terpstra claims Tour of Flanders win". BBC Sport. Retrieved 1 April 2018.
  8. ^ "Road World Championship: Denmark's Mads Pedersen claims shock elite men's road race title". BBC Sport. Retrieved 29 September 2019.
  9. ^ MacLeary, John (29 September 2019). "Mads Pedersen clinches Denmark's first men's world championship road race title under horrid Yorkshire skies". The Telegraph.

External links[edit]