Magallanes Basin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Magallanes Basin is a major geological basin reaching as far north as upper Patagonia in Chile. Rocks within it derive from the Jurassic period and includes the Cerro Toro formation.[1] This basin offers opportunities to study numerous ancient fossil lifeforms and other prehistorical natural features due to the deep sedimentary layering.

Prehistoric man[edit]

Certain geologic formations within the Magallanes Basin offered early humans rock shelters and caves; one of the most notable of such locations is the Cueva del Milodon, a site where ancient man was known to live, based upon the archaeological recovery[2] from this series of caves.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Julie C. Fosdick (2007) LATE MIOCENE EXHUMATION OF THE MAGALLANES BASIN AND SUB-ANDEAN FOLD BELT, SOUTHERN CHILE: NEW CONSTRAINTS FROM APATITE U-TH/HE THERMOCHRONOLOGY, Geological Society of America, Denver Annual Meeting (28–31 October 2007) Paper No. 123-15
  • C. Michael Hogan, Cueva del Milodon, The Megalithic Portal, 13 April 2008 [2]

Line notes[edit]

  1. ^ J.C. Fosdick, 2007
  2. ^ C. Michael Hogan, Cueva del Milodon, Megalithic Portal, 13 April 2008 [1]