Magnetic logic

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Magnetic logic is digital logic made using the non linear properties of wound ferrite cores.[1] Magnetic logic represents 0 and 1 by magnetising cores clockwise or anticlockwise.[2]

Examples of magnetic logic include core memory. Also, AND, OR, NOT and clocked shift logic gates can be constructed using appropriate windings, and the use of diodes.

A complete computer called the ALWAC 800 was constructed using magnetic logic, but it was not commercially successful. The Elliott 803 computer used a combination of magnetic cores (for logic function) and germanium transistors (as pulse amplifiers) for its CPU. It was a commercial success.

Magnetic logic was able to achieve switching speeds of about 1Mhz but was overtaken by semiconductor based electronics which was able to switch much faster.

Magnetic logic has advantages in that it is non volatile, it may be powered down without losing its state, and in the form of core memory was used for over two decades.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "All-Magnetic Logic". Timeline of Innovations. SRI International. Retrieved 2013-07-01. 
  2. ^ MAGNETIC CORES - PART I - PROPERTIES - Department of Defense 1962 - PIN 28374 - PROPERTIES OF MAGNETIC CORES AND THEIR APPLICATION IN DATA PROCESSING SYSTEM; HOW INFORMATION IS STORED AND TRANSFERRED FROM ONE CORE TO ANOTHER.