Mahagandhayon Monastery

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Mahagandhayon Monastery
မဟာဂန္ဓာရုံကျောင်းတိုက်
Mahagandhayon Monastery, Amarapura, Mandalay, Myanmar - 20141207-09.JPG
Religion
AffiliationBuddhism
SectTheravada Buddhism
RegionMandalay Region
StatusActive
Location
MunicipalityAmarapura
CountryMyanmar
Mahagandhayon Monastery is located in Myanmar
Mahagandhayon Monastery
Shown within Myanmar
Geographic coordinates21°53′48″N 96°02′54″E / 21.896586°N 96.048434°E / 21.896586; 96.048434Coordinates: 21°53′48″N 96°02′54″E / 21.896586°N 96.048434°E / 21.896586; 96.048434
Architecture
Date established1908; 111 years ago (1908)

Mahāgandhāyon Monastery (Burmese: မဟာဂန္ဓာရုံကျောင်းတိုက်; Pali: Mahāgandhārāma Vihāra), located in Amarapura, Myanmar, is the country's most prominent monastic college.[1] The monastery, known for its strict adherence to the Vinaya, the Buddhist monastic code.[2]

Buddhist monks in Mahagandhayon Monastery line up barefoot to accept their late morning meal offered by donors.

History[edit]

The monastery was first established by Agatithuka Sayadaw,[3] a Thudhamma-affiliated monk around 1908, as a meditation monastery for forest-dwelling monks.[2] The monastery gained further prominence under the leadership of Ashin Janakābhivaṃsa, who began living there in 1914.[3] During the 1970s, Ne Win, the country's leader, sought advice from Shwegyin monks at the monastery.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Buswell Jr, Robert E.; Lopez Jr, Donald S. (2013). The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism. Princeton University Press. ISBN 9781400848058.
  2. ^ a b Mendelson, E. Michael (1975). Sangha and State in Burma: A Study of Monastic Sectarianism and Leadership. Cornell University Press. ISBN 9780801408755.
  3. ^ a b Lynn, Nyan Hlaing (29 August 2016). "A refuge of monastic discipline in Mandalay". Frontier Myanmar. Retrieved 2016-11-13.
  4. ^ Carbine, Jason A. (2011). Sons of the Buddha: Continuities and Ruptures in a Burmese Monastic Tradition. Walter de Gruyter. ISBN 9783110254099.

External links[edit]